January 2008 Briefing - Allergy

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Allergy for January 2008. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Mouse Study Shines Light on Breast-Feeding Protection

TUESDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Mice exposed to airborne antigens transfer them through breast milk, leading to antigen-specific tolerance and protection from allergic airway disease in their offspring, according to research published online Jan. 27 in the journal Nature Medicine.

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Nasal Wash Benefits Children with Colds and Flu

TUESDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- In school-age children, the regular use of a saline nasal wash may help reduce cold and flu symptoms and may also help prevent future upper respiratory tract infections, researchers report in the January issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Lengthy Exposure to Maternal Distress Ups Asthma Risk

MONDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Children exposed to maternal distress -- particularly after the postpartum period -- face an increased risk of developing asthma, according to research published in the Jan. 15 American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Bedtime Prednisone Beneficial in Rheumatoid Arthritis

FRIDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with rheumatoid arthritis, modified-release prednisone taken at bedtime may reduce morning joint stiffness better than immediate-release prednisone taken in the morning, according to a study published in the Jan. 19 issue of The Lancet.

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Tighter Air Regulations May Lead to Decreased Mortality

THURSDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Using current particulate data for 26 European cities, members of the Apheis network hypothesized that the greater the reduction of concentration of fine particles less than 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5) in air in European cities, the greater the decrease in mortality among people 30 years of age and up, according to study findings published in the February issue of the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Maternal Mediterranean Diet Reduces Childhood Asthma

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Women who adhere to a Mediterranean diet during pregnancy are less likely to have children who suffer from wheeze and atopy, according to a report published online Jan. 15 in Thorax.

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Protein Linked to Airway Change in Chronic Asthma

MONDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The Pin1 protein contributes to lung fibrosis and airway remodeling in chronic asthma by regulating activated eosinophils' production of transforming growth factor-beta-1 (TGF-β1), according to research published online Jan. 10 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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Inflammation Activates Adrenal Immune Cells

MONDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Systemic inflammation appears to trigger profound local changes in adrenal gland immune cells. Changes include induction of inflammatory mediators as part of a complex signaling circuit, which is a process that may be involved in regulating stress hormone release, reports an article published online Jan. 3 in Endocrinology.

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Race Affects Indicator of Lung Inflammation in Children

MONDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In children, race is a factor that affects the fractional concentration of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) -- an indicator of airway inflammation in people with asthma -- according to research published in the January issue of Chest.

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Role of Infant Nutrition in Atopic Disease Examined

TUESDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- There is inadequate evidence to demonstrate that dietary restrictions during pregnancy or after the ages of 4 to 6 months have any protective effect on the development of atopic disease in children, according to a clinical report published in the January issue of Pediatrics.

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Farm Pesticides Linked to Adult-Onset Asthma

MONDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- In farm women, exposure to pesticides may increase the risk of adult-onset atopic asthma but not non-atopic asthma, according to a report published in the Jan. 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Use of Ratios in Drug Labeling Outdated, Linked to Errors

THURSDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians administering epinephrine in a simulated case of anaphylaxis made more dosing errors and took longer to administer the drug when the concentration of epinephrine was labeled as a ratio instead of in straightforward mass units, according to an article published in the Jan. 1 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Biomarker Predicts Severity of Anaphylaxis

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Serum levels of the proinflammatory molecule platelet-activating factor (PAF), and the enzyme that degrades it, PAF acetylhydrolase, appear to predict the severity of anaphylaxis, and thus drugs targeting the PAF pathway may hold promise in the treatment of anaphylaxis, according to an article published in the Jan. 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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