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June 2006 Briefing - Allergy

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Allergy for June 2006. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n

Antioxidant May Cut Contrast Dye-Induced Nephropathy

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WEDNESDAY, June 28 (HealthDay News) -- In myocardial infarction patients undergoing primary angioplasty, intravenous and oral doses of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine may help prevent contrast-medium-induced nephropathy and improve outcomes, according to a study published in the June 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Risk Linked to Sjogren's

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THURSDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- Sjogren's syndrome patients do have an elevated risk of developing non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, although the risk may not be as high as previously thought, according to a report in the June issue of the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.

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Researchers Identify Autoantibody in Scleroderma

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WEDNESDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with scleroderma produce autoantibodies that stimulate the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), which in turn activates the expression of collagen genes, according to a study published in the June 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The study provides new insight into the pathogenesis of the disease, the authors report.

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Company-Sponsored Trials Affect Physician Choice of Meds

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TUESDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians participating in a company-sponsored clinical trial are not likely to stray from recommended treatment guidelines but they do tend to prescribe more of the company's drugs, according to a report in the June 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Natural History of Adult Asthma Follows Predictable Pattern

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TUESDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- The evolution of asthma severity in adults is somewhat predictable, according to a study published in the June issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Cats, Ragweed Exposures Up Airway Hyperresponsiveness

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MONDAY, June 19 (HealthDay News) -- At-risk children exposed to cat, dust mite, cockroach and ragweed have a greater chance of lung airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), according to a report in the June issue of Chest.

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Accidental Peanut Ingestion Rate Low in Allergic Children

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MONDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of accidental ingestion of peanuts by children with peanut allergy in Quebec, Canada, appears to be lower than previously reported, according to a report published online May 28 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Food-Allergic Teens Often Take Dangerous Risks

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MONDAY, June 19 (HealthDay News) -- Many teens and young adults with food allergies indulge in behavior that places them at high risk of life-threatening anaphylactic reactions, according to a study published in the June issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Odor Intolerance May Be Sign of Airway Hyperreactivity

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FRIDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with self-reported intolerance to odors are more likely to be sensitive to inhaled capsaicin and may have a condition known as airway sensory hyperreactivity, Swedish researchers report in the June issue of Chest.

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Unpasteurized Milk May Protect Against Childhood Allergies

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FRIDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- A study of farmers' children in rural England suggests that the reason they historically have fewer allergies is because they drink unpasteurized milk, according to a report in the June issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Asthmatic Kids More Sensitive to Small Particulate Matter

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FRIDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- Asthmatic children show increased sensitivity to particulate air pollutants compared with healthy children as measured by the percentage of eosinophils in their nasal fluid, according to a report in the June issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Long-Acting ß-Agonists Raise Risk of Fatal Asthma Attacks

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FRIDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- The use of long-acting ß-agonists increases the risk of severe, life-threatening and fatal exacerbations of asthma, according to a review published online June 6 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Breathing Techniques Can Cut Over-Use of Inhaler

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THURSDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with asthma who use breathing techniques or upper-body exercises can reduce their use of reliever inhalers by up to 80 percent, according to a study published online June 5 in Thorax.

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Cereal Introduced After Six Months Linked to Wheat Allergy

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WEDNESDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Children who are exposed to cereal grains after six months of age are more likely to develop wheat allergy than those exposed before that age, according to a report in the June issue of Pediatrics. In addition, children are at higher risk of wheat allergy if they have a first-degree relative with eczema, hives or asthma.

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