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October 2006 Briefing - Allergy

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Allergy for October 2006. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Subpollen Particles May Be Cause of Seasonal Asthma

MONDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Subpollen particles of breathable size released by ragweed contain allergenic proteins and induce allergic airway inflammation in a mouse model of asthma, possibly explaining some severe symptoms of seasonal asthma, according to a study in the October issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Glucose Test Can Identify Conjunctival Hyperreactivity

MONDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- A hyperosmolar provocation test can predict conjunctival hyperreactivity in patients with ocular discomfort regardless of whether they have allergy, according to the results of a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Preterm Infants at Higher Risk of Asthma

FRIDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- A meta-analysis of published studies suggests that infants born prematurely are at higher risk than full-term infants of developing asthma later in life, according to a study in the October issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Sensitivity to Ladybug Allergen More Common Than Thought

TUESDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Ladybug allergies are apparently more common than once thought, according to three reports in the October issue of the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology that describe adults and children with high sensitivity for ladybug allergens.

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FDA Approves Omnaris for Hay Fever

MONDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the nasal spray Omnaris (ciclesonide) for the treatment of seasonal and perennial allergic rhinitis among adults and children aged 12 and older.

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Anxiety Disorders Associated with Physical Conditions

MONDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Anxiety disorders are linked with many serious physical conditions, a co-morbidity that increases the risk of disability and a poor quality of life, according to the results of a study published in the Oct. 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Measles Vaccine Response Same in Asthmatic Children

MONDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Children with asthma seem to respond to the measles vaccine just as those without asthma, according to a report in the October issue of the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Previous work has suggested that children with a TH2-predominant condition such as asthma may have a weaker response to the vaccine and may predispose these children to measles outbreaks.

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High-Dose Fluticasone Impairs Adrenal Function in Children

FRIDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Children prescribed more than the maximum recommended daily dose of inhaled fluticasone proprionate are more likely to experience adrenal insufficiency, according to a report in the October issue of the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Visible Mold Increases Wheezing Risk in Infants

THURSDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Visible mold but not house dust mite allergen appears to increase the risk of wheezing in high-risk infants by at least twofold, according to a study in the October issue of Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

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Infant Lung Function May Predict Childhood Asthma

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Newborns with reduced lung function may have an increased risk of developing asthma by age 10, according to a study published in the Oct. 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Granzyme B Release by Basophils May Play Role in Asthma

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Basophils rapidly produce, package and secrete granzyme B after stimulation by the cytokine interleukin-3, according to a report in the Oct. 1 issue of Blood. This unsuspected role of granzyme B in allergic inflammation might be involved in other Th2-type immune responses as well, the authors note.

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FDA Approves Fifth U.S. Flu Vaccine

THURSDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted accelerated approval to another influenza vaccine for use during the 2006-2007 flu season. The vaccine, FluLaval, will be distributed by GlaxoSmithKline and is the fifth flu vaccine to be approved for use in the United States.

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Ragweed Vaccine Shows Promise for Allergic Rhinitis

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 4 (HealthDay News) -- A pilot study of a ragweed pollen vaccine has shown promising long-term results for treatment of allergic rhinitis, according to a report in the Oct. 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Infliximab Cuts Asthma Attacks in Small Study

MONDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with moderate asthma who received infliximab, a monoclonal antibody that neutralizes the inflammatory cytokine TNF-α, had fewer disease exacerbations than those taking placebo, according to a report in the Oct. 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Physician's Briefing