Health Tip: Considering an Alternative Therapy?

Here are signs that it may be fraudulent and unsafe

Please note: This article was published more than one year ago. The facts and conclusions presented may have since changed and may no longer be accurate. And "More information" links may no longer work. Questions about personal health should always be referred to a physician or other health care professional.

(HealthDay News) -- Alternative therapies, such as herbal remedies, are becoming increasingly popular. But you should always use caution when using any alternative remedy. In the United States, there is no single federal regulating body, such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, for alternative therapies.

The American Cancer Society lists warning signs that an alternative therapy may be fraudulent and unsafe:

  • If the treatment is based on a theory that hasn't been scientifically proven.
  • If the treatment's advocates promise a cure for a serious condition (such as cancer or AIDS).
  • If the treatment's advocates suggest that you not take other medications or receive standard medical treatments.
  • If the treatment is based on a "secret formula" that can't be disclosed.
  • If the treatment is only available in certain countries.
  • If the treatment's advocates offer guarantees of no side effects.

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