Heart Patients Sought for Alternative Therapy

Researchers plan to try chelation treatment

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FRIDAY, May 14, 2004 (HealthDayNews) -- Researchers are looking for cardiac patients to participate in a study to test whether chelation therapy can prevent heart attacks.

Chelation, an alternative form of therapy, involves the intravenous infusion of disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, combined with high doses of antioxidant vitamin and mineral supplements.

Doctors with Rush University Medical Center believe the combination of calcium, zinc, cadmium, manganese, iron, and copper may reduce artery-clogging calcium deposits.

Once enrolled in the study, patients will receive 30 weekly infusions of either the chelation solution or a placebo, followed by 10 additional infusion sessions every other week.

To qualify, patients must be older than 50 and have had a documented heart attack more than six weeks before enrollment. People who have had chelation therapy within the last five years or have a history of allergic reaction to chelation therapy are not eligible.

To enroll, call (888) 644-6226. More information about the national Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy can be found here.

More information

The American Heart Association has more about chelation therapy for heart disease.

SOURCES: Rush University, news release, May 6, 2004

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