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August 2010 Briefing - Anesthesiology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Anesthesiology for August 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Forearm Anesthesia Technique Effective in Palm Procedure

MONDAY, Aug. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Prilocaine administered in the forearm provides effective anesthesia without adverse events or nerve damage among patients receiving botulinum toxin (BTX) for the treatment of palmar hyperhidrosis, according to a study in the September issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Surgery in Developing Countries Has Low Mortality

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Operative mortality is generally low in surgical programs in resource-limited countries, according to a study in the August issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Adherence to Discography Guidelines Is Lackluster

THURSDAY, Aug. 12 (HealthDay News) -- National compliance with professional guidelines for discography, a controversial procedure to diagnose disc damage contributing to back pain, ranges from poor to fair, according to research published in the August issue of the Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques.

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Angiography Urged for Vascular Bleeding After Spine Surgery

MONDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Evaluation of possible vascular injuries occurring during spinal surgery should be rapid, starting with computed tomography (CT) in most cases and progressing immediately to angiography if arterial bleeding is suspected, according to research published in the August issue of the Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques.

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Menstrual Phase Linked to Tracheal Intubation Response

MONDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Menstrual cycle phase appears to influence the hemodynamic response to tracheal intubation (TI), according to research published in the August issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia.

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Nurse Liaisons Smooth Perioperative Experience

FRIDAY, Aug. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Perioperative nurse liaisons for family members of patients undergoing surgical procedures may help family members manage stress and view the process in a more positive light, according to an article in the August issue of the AORN Journal.

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ASA Survey Finds Exaggerated Anxiety About Anesthesia

THURSDAY, Aug. 5 (HealthDay News) -- As many as one in four patients might postpone surgery because of anxiety about anesthesia, according to the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) "Vital Health Report," a survey of the attitudes and beliefs the general public has about anesthesia.

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FDA: NeoProfen Recalled Due to Visible Particulate Matter

TUESDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has alerted health care professionals of a voluntary recall of two lots of Lundbeck Inc.'s ibuprofen lysine (NeoProfen) injection, as the product did not meet a visible particulate quality requirement.

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Nurse Anesthetists Give Safe Care Without Supervision

TUESDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Certified registered nurse anesthetists providing anesthesia services without supervision by a physician do not put patients at increased risk of death or complications, according to research published in the August issue of Health Affairs.

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Industry-Funded Clinical Trials Yield More Positive Outcomes

TUESDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Drug clinical trials supported by industry are more likely to produce favorable results than trials supported by government or nonprofit/nonfederal organizations, and they are less likely to be published within two years of the study being completed, according to research published in the Aug. 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Physician's Briefing