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March 2016 Briefing - Anesthesiology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Anesthesiology for March 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Antipsychotics Not Effective for Delirium in Hospitalized Patients

TUESDAY, March 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Antipsychotic medications do not appear to be effective for preventing or treating delirium in adult medical or surgical inpatients, according to a review published online March 23 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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How Can We Fix the Wage Gap Among Female Physicians?

MONDAY, March 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women doctors can address the gender wage disparity by understanding the reasons why they earn less, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Protocolized Handover Process Sustainable for Reducing Errors

THURSDAY, March 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A protocolized handover process correlates with a sustained reduction in the number of errors for children being transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU) after cardiac surgery, according to a study published online March 21 in Pediatric Anesthesia.

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FDA: Most Powdered Medical Gloves Should Be Banned in U.S.

MONDAY, March 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration wants to ban most powdered medical gloves, saying they pose serious health risks to patients and health care providers alike.

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AANA: Men Should Avoid Erectile Dysfunction Meds Prior to Surgery

MONDAY, March 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA) is recommending that men avoid erectile dysfunction medications before surgery.

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Physicians Respond to New CDC Opioid Guidelines

MONDAY, March 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians have responded to the new U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's clinical guidelines for prescribing opioids, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Case Before Supreme Court May Expose Doctors to Large Fines

FRIDAY, March 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A case before a state supreme court could potentially expose physicians to large fines based on a legal technicality relating to what they should have known, rather than what they knew, according to the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Some Similarities in Expectations for Pain Patients, Physicians

THURSDAY, March 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- There are some similarities in expectations and goals for pain patients and physicians, according to a study published online March 15 in Pain Practice.

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Significant Changes in Liver Blood Flow With Prone Positioning

THURSDAY, March 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Prone positioning is associated with significant changes in hepatocellular function and cardiac output in healthy volunteers, according to research published online March 7 in Anaesthesia.

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Meditation-Induced Analgesia Not Mediated by Endogenous Opioids

THURSDAY, March 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Mindfulness meditation-induced analgesia does not rely on opioidergic mechanisms, according to a study published in the March 16 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.

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Spending on Prescription Meds Up About 5 Percent in 2015

THURSDAY, March 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Spending on prescription medications for insured Americans increased about 5 percent in 2015, with the increase half of that seen in 2014, the Associated Press reported.

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Patient-Controlled Analgesia Non-Inferior After C-Section

WEDNESDAY, March 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Early patient-controlled oral analgesia is non-inferior to standard parenteral analgesia for pain management after elective cesarean section, according to a study published online March 2 in Anaesthesia.

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Disruptive Patients Distract Docs, May Receive Compromised Care

WEDNESDAY, March 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Disruptive patients may get worse care from physicians, according to a study published online March 7 in BMJ Quality & Safety. The findings aren't definitive because the researchers tested how physicians responded in fictional vignettes, instead of real-life encounters. Still, the results suggest that such patients distract physicians from doing their jobs.

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Mayo Clinic Has Established Model to Help Battle Burnout

TUESDAY, March 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In an effort to reduce burnout among physicians, the Mayo Clinic is initiating a model to raise camaraderie and increase collaboration, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Physicians' Contracts Can Affect Patients, Professionalism

WEDNESDAY, March 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Problematic clauses in physicians' contracts can impact patient care and professionalism, according to an Ideas and Opinions piece published online March 8 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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SCOTUS: States Can't Force Health Care Data Release

WEDNESDAY, March 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Supreme Court has ruled against state efforts to collect health care data from insurance plans.

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Spouse Education Level May Impact Choice for Rural Practice

WEDNESDAY, March 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians who are married to a highly-educated spouse are less likely to work in rural underserved areas, according to a study published in the March 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Physician's Briefing