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September 2011 Briefing - Anesthesiology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Anesthesiology for September 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Surfactants Feasible for Self-Breathing Preterm Infants

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Application of surfactant to spontaneously breathing preterm infants stabilized with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is feasible, and reduces the need for mechanical ventilation, according to a study published online Sept. 30 in The Lancet.

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Doctors, Patients Identify Tacit Clues in Their Interactions

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Both doctors and patients identify tacit clues as well as judgments based on these clues during video elicitation interviews of health maintenance examinations, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

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Calcineurin-Inhibitor-Sparing Regimens Improve Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Use of calciuneurin-inhibitor-sparing regimens immediately after kidney transplantation is associated with improved outcomes, including less delayed graft function, improved graft function, and less new-onset diabetes, according to a meta-analysis published online Sept. 23 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Fear of Childbirth Tied to Higher Odds of Cesarean Section

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency and elective cesarean sections (CS) are more common in women with a fear of childbirth, even after psychological counseling, according to a study published online July 24 in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica.

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Reasons for Referral to Specific Docs Differ Among Physicians

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Primary care physicians (PCPs) and medical and surgical specialists differ in their reasons for selecting specific colleagues for referrals, with PCPs more concerned about physician communication and medical record sharing than specialists, according to a study published online Sept. 16 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Mortality Up in Hospitals With More Minority Trauma Patients

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The odds of in-hospital mortality for trauma patients are associated with the proportion of minority patients in the hospital, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in the Archives of Surgery.

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Work Intensity Similar Across Physician Specialties

MONDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The level of physician work intensity appears to be similar among specialties, with variations in the specific dimensions of stress, physical demands, performance, and temporal demand, according to a study published online Sept. 3 in Medical Care.

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Opioid Delivery to Olfactory Region Ups Therapeutic Effects

FRIDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Administration of opioids directly to the nasal olfactory region results in a larger fraction of drug being delivered to the central nervous system (CNS) and a significantly higher therapeutic effect without an increase in plasma drug exposure compared to drug delivery to the nasal respiratory region in rats, according to an experimental study published in the September issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia.

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Medical Students Show Racial, Cultural Patient Preference

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Medical students may have a preferential bias toward whites and wealthier patients, but this does not appear to influence their clinical decision making or physician-patient interactions, according to a study published in the Sept. 7 medical education-themed issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Odds of Board Certification Vary in New Doctors

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Certification of recent U.S. medical school graduates by the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) varies across specialties by educational and demographic factors, according to a study published in the Sept. 7 medical education-themed issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Many Hospital Staff Uniforms Contaminated With Bacteria

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- More than 60 percent of hospital staff uniforms are contaminated with potentially pathogenic bacteria, including drug-resistant species, according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

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Training Protocols Do Not Affect Ventilation Knowledge

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- For first-time examinees of the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM), training in a high-intensity ventilator protocol environment does not correlate with worse knowledge about mechanical ventilation management compared to training in a low-intensity environment, according to a study published in the Sept. 7 medical education-themed issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Simvastatin Neuroprotective for Spinal Cord Ischemia in Rats

FRIDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Simvastatin significantly reduces hindlimb motor dysfunction, and reduces white- and gray-matter injury 24 to 48 hours after reperfusion in rats with spinal cord ischemia, according to an experimental study published in the September issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia.

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Dexamethasone Dose of >0.1 mg/kg Reduces Post-Op Pain

THURSDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Dexamethasone at doses of greater than 0.1 mg/kg decreases postoperative pain and reduces opioid consumption, according to a meta-analysis published in the September issue of Anesthesiology.

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