Steady Diet of Soy Cuts Breast Cancer Risk

Study finds consumption can lower chances of disease by as much as 22%

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WEDNESDAY, April 27, 2005 (HealthDay News) -- Regular consumption of soy protein may reduce breast cancer risk by as much as 22 percent, claims a study in the April issue of The International Journal of Cancer Prevention.

One of the researchers, Lin Yan, is director of cancer research at The Solae Co., which sells soy products.

The findings are based on a review of data from 12 published epidemiological studies that looked at soy consumption and breast cancer. The review found a link between soy consumption and reduced breast cancer risk in both premenopausal and postmenopausal women. The findings also suggest that soy intake during adolescence may reduce breast cancer risk later in life.

The authors claim the findings of this review support scientific evidence contained in a petition The Solae Co. filed with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for a Qualified Health Claim linking consumption of foods and beverages that contain soy protein to a reduced risk of certain cancers.

The FDA decision on that petition is expected in late spring.

More information

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has more about soy.

SOURCE: Cushman/Amberg Communications, news release, April 21, 2005

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