Health Tip: Teach Teens About Sun Safety

Explain why it's important

Please note: This article was published more than one year ago. The facts and conclusions presented may have since changed and may no longer be accurate. And "More information" links may no longer work. Questions about personal health should always be referred to a physician or other health care professional.

(HealthDay News) -- Teens enjoying carefree fun in the sun may not worry about wrinkles, sun damage or skin cancer -- but they should. It's a conversation that parents should have with teens to prevent problems later.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends talking to teens about:

  • Staying out of the sun when its rays are strongest, between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
  • Wearing light clothing with tightly-woven fabric, which helps to reflect the sun's rays. A wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses also offer protection.
  • Applying a broad-spectrum sunscreen every day before going outdoors, and reapplying throughout the day. Make sure it's applied to the entire body, including the tops of the ears and feet.
  • Regularly checking skin for moles that look suspicious, and pointing any out to a parent or doctor.

--

Last Updated: