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Filter System Removes Up to Half of Angiography Contrast Dye

System removes iodine in pig model, could prevent kidney damage after percutaneous coronary intervention

THURSDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have successfully tested a filtering system in pigs that can remove up to 50 percent of contrast dye used for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), averting the dangerous side-effect of contrast-induced nephropathy, according to a report in the May 2 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Ichiro Michishita, M.D., Ph.D., from Yokohama Sakae Kyosai Hospital in Yokohama, and Zenzo Fujii, M.D., Ph.D., from Yamaguchi University School of Medicine in Yamaguchi, Japan, tested the contrast removal system in eight pigs who were injected with 155 ml of contrast medium. A suction catheter was used to redirect venous blood from the coronary sinus through a charcoal adsorbing column and back through the femoral artery.

The investigators found that the mean iodine removal rate was 49.4 percent, accounting for 72 percent of contrast that passed through the column. The area under the curve of iodine concentration in femoral venous blood versus time after treatment was 60 percent lower in the column group than the control group. No side effects were noted.

"The present study confirms that the novel contrast removal system from the coronary sinus using the adsorbing column is effective and safe in swine during coronary angiography," the authors conclude. "The indication of this system may have potential in human patients with pre-existing renal insufficiency, diabetic nephropathy, or many risk factors who are undergoing PCI for complicated lesions."

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