Anger, Hostility Linked to Coronary Heart Disease

Depression also associated with heart disease in healthy individuals

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Anger, hostility and depression are associated with a higher risk of coronary heart disease in healthy individuals, according to two studies published in the Mar. 17 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

In the first study, Yoichi Chida, M.D., Ph.D., and a colleague from University College London in the United Kingdom performed a meta-analysis of 44 studies examining the association between anger and hostility and coronary heart disease. They found that anger and hostility were associated with a higher risk of coronary heart disease events in the 25 studies involving initially healthy populations (combined hazard ratio, 1.19) and with poor prognosis in the 19 studies involving patients with existing coronary heart disease (hazard ratio, 1.24).

In the second study, William Whang, M.D., from Columbia University Medical Center in New York City, and colleagues prospectively analyzed data from 63,469 healthy women, where 7.9 percent had symptoms predictive of clinical depression, to determine the association between depression and coronary heart disease. They found that depressive symptoms were associated with fatal coronary heart disease (hazard ratio, 1.49) and sudden cardiac death (hazard ratio, 2.33). Antidepressant use was also associated with sudden cardiac death (hazard ratio 3.34), the report indicates.

"The authors should be congratulated for these important data on the potential etiologic role of depression and its treatment on cardiovascular outcomes in a very large cohort of healthy individuals," Sanjiv M. Narayan, M.D., and Murray B. Stein, M.D., from the University of California San Diego, write in an accompanying editorial.

Narayan and Stein report several financial relationships with the pharmaceutical industry.

Abstract - Chida
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Abstract - Whang
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