See What HealthDay Can Do For You
Contact Us

Gender Difference Seen in Acute Coronary Syndrome

Men seen as more likely to present with excessive sweating, women with nausea

MONDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with acute coronary syndrome, men are more likely to present with excessive sweating, or diaphoresis, while women are more likely to present with nausea, according to the results of a study published in the November issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Cynthia Arslanian-Engoren, Ph.D., of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, and colleagues evaluated symptom similarities and differences in 1,941 patients with acute coronary syndrome, 35 percent of them women.

The researchers found that men were more likely to present with chest pain, left arm pain or diaphoresis, while women were more likely to present with nausea. Both sexes were equally likely to present with dyspnea. After binary logistic regression, the investigators found that women were less likely than men to present with diaphoresis (odds ratio, 0.763), more likely to present with nausea (OR, 1.477), and that gender was not a statistically significant predictor of chest or left arm pain.

"We found that differences in occurrence of chest pain and left arm pain between men and women are explainable by differences in co-morbidities and history; the higher occurrence of diaphoresis in men and of nausea in women is partly related to maleness or femaleness," the authors write. "In conclusion, gender should be considered when evaluating patients with symptoms of acute coronary syndrome."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Physician's Briefing

HealthDay

HealthDay is the world’s largest syndicator of health news and content, and providers of custom health/medical content.

Consumer Health News

A health news feed, reviewing the latest and most topical health stories.

Professional News

A news feed for Health Care Professionals (HCPs), reviewing latest medical research and approvals.