Depression Linked to Worse Bypass Grafting Outcomes

Higher rates of death, rehospitalization for heart failure, myocardial infarction, or stroke

Depression Linked to Worse Bypass Grafting Outcomes

FRIDAY, Sept. 26, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with established ischemic heart disease undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), depression is associated with increased mortality and poor cardiovascular outcomes, according to a study published in the Sept. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Malin Stenman, from the Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm, and colleagues evaluated data from a nationwide, population-based, cohort of all 56,064 patients who underwent primary, isolated, nonemergent CABG in Sweden from 1997 to 2008. Other national registries were used to cross-link individual-level data, including depression status and outcomes.

The researchers found that 0.6 percent of patients had depression before CABG. During a mean follow-up of 7.5 years, 35 percent of patients with depression and 25 percent of controls died. There was a significant association between depression and increased mortality (multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio, 1.65) and with the combined end point of death or rehospitalization for myocardial infarction, heart failure, or stroke (multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio, 1.61).

"In conclusion, we found a strong and significant association between depression and long-term survival in patients with established ischemic heart disease who underwent CABG," the authors write.

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