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Prevalence, Costs of Heart Failure Estimated for 2030

More than eight million U.S. adults expected to have heart failure by 2030; $70 billion in costs

Prevalence, Costs of Heart Failure Estimated for 2030

THURSDAY, April 25 (HealthDay News) -- The impact of heart failure is likely to increase, with more than eight million U.S. adults anticipated to have heart failure by 2030, at an estimated total cost of $70 billion, according to a study published online April 24 in Circulation: Heart Failure.

Paul A. Heidenreich, M.D., from Stanford University in California, and colleagues estimated the epidemiology and future costs of heart failure from 2012 to 2030, based on a model that assumes heart failure prevalence will remain constant and that the costs and technological innovation will continue to increase at the same rate.

The researchers projected that more than eight million people in the Unites States will have heart failure by 2030. The direct costs of medications are expected to increase from $21 billion in 2012 to $53 billion in 2030. The estimated total costs, including indirect costs, are expected to increase from $31 billion to $70 billion. Assuming all costs of cardiac care for patients with heart failure are attributable to heart failure, and not to comorbid conditions, the cost estimates projected for 2030 would be $160 billion in direct costs.

"Assuming continuation in present practice patterns, the cost of heart failure is projected to increase markedly over the next 18 years based on demographic changes in the population," the authors write. "The cost would be substantial, with each U.S. adult, on average, paying $244 annually by 2030 to care for the 10 million patients with heart failure."

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical and medical device industries.

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