Acetaminophen, NSAIDs Linked to Hypertension

Nurses' Health Study data link high-dose pain relievers, hypertension in women

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- High daily doses of acetaminophen and NSAIDs may increase the risk of hypertension in women, Harvard researchers reported at the American Heart Association's annual high blood pressure research meeting, in Washington, D.C.

John P. Forman, M.D., and colleagues from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, collected data on 1,903 women, 51 to 77 years of age, who participated in the Nurses' Health Study I, as well as 3,220 women, 34 to 53 years of age, who participated in the Nurses' Health Study II. Among these women, the researchers analyzed self-reported hypertension and average daily dose of acetaminophen, NSAIDs and aspirin.

They found that, compared with women who did not use acetaminophen, the relative risk for being hypertensive for women who took more than 500 mg/d was 1.74 among older women and 2.00 among younger women. For NSAIDs, at a similar dose, the risk of being hypertensive was 1.74 among older women and 1.57 among younger women, compared with women who did not take these drugs, according to the report. There were no significant associations between aspirin and hypertension, the researchers add.

"Because acetaminophen and NSAIDs are commonly used, they may contribute to the high prevalence of hypertension in the United States," the researchers conclude.

Abstract (P188; P.99)

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