American College of Chest Physicians Annual Meeting, Oct. 20-25, 2007

CHEST 2007

The American College of Chest Physicians' annual meeting -- CHEST 2007 -- took place Oct. 20-25 in Chicago, and attracted about 5,000 attendees from around the world. The meeting featured more than 500 speakers, sessions on sleep medicine, cardiovascular diseases, thoracic surgery and interdisciplinary care, and the latest AACP evidence-based guidelines for lung cancer, occupational asthma and pulmonary rehabilitation.

Highlights included an expanded simulation center that offered attendees simulation experiences in areas including critical care medicine, airway management, polysomnography, pulmonary function testing, ultrasound and bronchoscopy, and allowed them to review their performances on tape. One popular center simulated a disaster in which victims were exposed to an unknown toxic agent.

"The simulation center was extremely popular. It's a forward-looking technology that excited a lot of attendees," said AACP President Alvin V. Thomas, Jr., M.D., of the Howard University College of Medicine in Washington, D.C. "Simulation in one way or another is eventually going to be used by some accrediting agencies to evaluate physicians' technical and clinical skills. We couldn't even come close to accommodating all the physicians who wanted to participate."

Some of the most well-attended sessions addressed topics in critical care medicine such as biomarkers in critically ill patients, and guidelines for treating sepsis and associated shock and organ failure. Other popular sessions showed how undiagnosed sleep disorders can increase the risk of middle-of-the night cardiac arrests and other cardiovascular events in patients with heart disease. "We're finding that some of these patients have sleep apnea," Thomas said. "During abnormal sleep cycles, their blood-oxygen level can fall so low that it causes a cardiac event. So sleep issues are becoming increasingly important."

Another potentially practice-changing study was presented by Jonathan Parsons, M.D., of the Ohio State University Asthma Center in Columbus, who surveyed 541 athletic trainers affiliated with the NCAA and found that only 22 percent of programs had a pulmonologist on their sports medicine program staff. They also found that only 17 percent of programs used lung-function testing to evaluate suspected exercise-induced asthma.

"With the high incidence of asthma, we feel that sports medicine programs could significantly benefit from having a pulmonologist on staff who can evaluate athletes with asthma as those who haven't yet been diagnosed with asthma," Carlin said.

More Information

CHEST 2007: Antioxidants May Benefit Smokers

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Smokers who take supplemental antioxidant vitamins A, C or E -- either separately or together -- may experience improved lung function, according to research presented this week at CHEST 2007, the 73rd annual international scientific assembly of the American College of Chest Physicians in Chicago.

Abstract

CHEST 2007: Steroids Helped 9/11 Firefighters

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- New York City firefighters who completed a voluntary prophylactic regimen of inhaled corticosteroids immediately after the 2001 collapse of the World Trade Center had reduced respiratory symptoms and an improved quality of life, suggesting that the drugs can prevent respiratory illness, according to research presented this week at CHEST 2007, the 73rd annual international scientific assembly of the American College of Chest Physicians in Chicago.

Abstract

CHEST 2007: Alcohol May Improve Lung Function

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Light to moderate drinkers may be less likely than non-drinkers to have abnormal lung function regardless of smoking status or evidence of lung or heart disease, according to research presented this week at CHEST 2007, the 73rd annual international scientific assembly of the American College of Chest Physicians in Chicago.

Abstract

CHEST 2007: Uncontrolled Asthma Leads to Absenteeism

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Children and adults with uncontrolled asthma have two to three times as many asthma-related school and work absences as patients with controlled asthma, according to research presented this week at CHEST 2007, the 73rd annual international scientific assembly of the American College of Chest Physicians in Chicago.

Abstract

CHEST 2007: Hypnotherapy May Help Smokers Quit

TUESDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In hospitalized smokers, hypnotherapy may increase the likelihood of smoking cessation. But hypnotherapy is more likely to succeed in patients with a cardiac diagnosis than in those with a pulmonary diagnosis, according to research presented this week at CHEST 2007, the 73rd annual international scientific assembly of the American College of Chest Physicians in Chicago.

Abstract

CHEST 2007: Pulse Co-Oximetry Identifies Smokers

TUESDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- A simple, non-invasive carbon monoxide test may help physicians easily identify patients who are smokers, or exposed to secondhand smoke, according to research presented this week at CHEST 2007, the 73rd annual international scientific assembly of the American College of Chest Physicians in Chicago.

Abstract

CHEST 2007: Age Affects Smoking Cessation Efforts

MONDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Younger and older smokers vary greatly in their health status and report significantly different obstacles that prevent them from quitting smoking, according to research presented this week at CHEST 2007, the 73rd annual international scientific assembly of the American College of Chest Physicians in Chicago.

Abstract

Physician's Briefing