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American College of Cardiology, March 9-11, 2013

The American College of Cardiology's 62nd Annual Scientific Session and Expo

The annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology was held from March 9 to 11 in San Francisco and attracted more than 19,000 participants from around the world, including clinicians, academicians, allied health professionals, and others interested in cardiology. The conference highlighted recent advances in the treatment, management, and prevention of cardiovascular diseases, with presentations also focusing on novel drugs and surgical approaches to improve the quality of care for patients with cardiovascular diseases.

In one study, Ola Vedin, M.D., of the Uppsala University Hospital in Sweden, and colleagues found an association between poor dental health and a wide range of traditional and novel cardiovascular risk factors.

"Self-reported tooth loss and gum bleeding, as markers of periodontal disease, are common in this global population of patients with established coronary heart disease (i.e., previous myocardial infarction or verified coronary artery stenosis)," Vedin said. "Poor dental health, especially tooth loss, is associated with several established cardiovascular risk factors, including diabetes, smoking, high blood pressure, and obesity, but also with more novel ones, including lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 activity."

While the results of this study were compelling, according to Vedin, they do not constitute enough evidence to presently advocate treatment of periodontitis or other dental disease in order to lower the risk of cardiovascular events.

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In another study, Alfred Bove, M.D., of Temple University in Philadelphia, and colleagues found that a telemedicine program that involved patients self-reporting blood pressure and weight in underserved and urban communities resulted in lower blood pressure and improved compliance.

"In hypertensive subjects without symptoms, and no diabetes, self-measuring and self-reporting blood pressure twice weekly helps patients achieve normal blood pressure," said Bove. "Measuring blood pressure about once a week motivates patients and providers to reach blood pressure goals. A team care approach can achieve this goal without the need for weekly physician visits."

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Michelle Dalgas Schmiegelow, M.D., of Gentofte Hospital in Hellerup, Denmark, and colleagues found that high body mass index was associated with heart attack and stroke in young women.

"In this nationwide study of young women with a median age of 30 years and a follow-up of 4.5 years following childbirth, we found obesity (body mass index greater than 30 kg/m²) to be associated with an increased risk of myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke," said Schmiegelow. "The key message from our study is not the absolute risks, which are low, but the fact that the associations between increased body mass index and increased risks of myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke become apparent in such a young population within a relatively short follow-up."

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ACC: Ranolazine Relieves Chest Pain in Type 2 Diabetes

TUESDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- Ranolazine reduces chest pain in patients with type 2 diabetes and angina, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 9 to 11 in San Francisco.

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ACC: BNP-Guided Screening and Treatment Aids Heart Failure

TUESDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- For older adults at risk of heart failure, B-type natriuretic peptide (NP)-guided screening and shared-care treatment is associated with a reduction in the prevalence of left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 9 to 11 in San Francisco.

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ACC: High-Dose Vitamins Don't Cut Recurrent Cardiac Events

TUESDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- For adults with previous myocardial infarction, high-dose oral vitamin and mineral supplementation is not associated with a reduction in cardiac events, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 9 to 11 in San Francisco.

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ACC: Patient Preference-Based Treatment Improves Depression

TUESDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- A centralized, patient preference-based program for depression care decreases symptoms in patients with post-acute coronary syndrome (ACS), according to a study published online March 7 in JAMA Internal Medicine to coincide with presentation at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 9 to 11 in San Francisco.

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ACC: Digoxin Cuts 30-Day Admission for Heart Failure

TUESDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- For older adults with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, digoxin is associated with a significant reduction in 30-day all-cause hospital admission, with no significant effect on mortality, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held March 9 to 11 in San Francisco.

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ACC: Sildenafil No Benefit for Exercise Capacity in Heart Failure

MONDAY, March 11 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with heart failure, sildenafil provides no benefit over placebo for exercise capacity or clinical status; and for hospitalized patients, aliskiren doesn't reduce cardiovascular death or prevent rehospitalization, according to two studies published online March 11 in the Journal of the American Medical Association to coincide with presentation at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 9 to 11 in San Francisco.

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ACC: No Difference in Outcomes With Off-Pump, On-Pump CABG

MONDAY, March 11 (HealthDay News) -- For patients scheduled for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), outcomes are not significantly different for those undergoing the procedure without cardiopulmonary bypass (off-pump) or with it (on-pump), according to two studies published online March 11 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with presentation at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 9 to 11 in San Francisco.

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ACC: PCI Outcomes No Worse Without On-Site Cardiac Surgery

MONDAY, March 11 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing nonemergency percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), clinical outcomes at 30 days and one year are similar with and without on-site cardiac surgery services, according to a study published online March 11 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with presentation at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 9 to 11 in San Francisco.

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ACC: Cangrelor Reduces Ischemic Events in Primary PCI

MONDAY, March 11 (HealthDay News) -- In primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), cangrelor correlates with reduced ischemic events; and, prehospital fibrinolysis with timely angiography is effective for reperfusion in patients unable to undergo primary PCI within one hour after ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), according to two studies published online March 10 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with presentation at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 9 to 11 in San Francisco.

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ACC: Darbepoetin Alfa Doesn't Up Outcome in Heart Failure

MONDAY, March 11 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with systolic heart failure and mild-to-moderate anemia, treatment of anemia with darbepoetin alfa is not associated with improved clinical outcomes, according to a study published online March 10 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with presentation at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 9 to 11 in San Francisco.

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ACC: Niacin/Laropiprant No Benefit in Vascular Disease

MONDAY, March 11 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with preexisting occlusive vascular disease, the combination of niacin and the anti-flushing agent laropiprant provides no benefit and is associated with an increase in serious side effects, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 9 to 11 in San Francisco.

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ACC: GLP-1 Analog Use Cuts Heart Failure Events in Diabetes

MONDAY, March 11 (HealthDay News) -- For adults with diabetes, use of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogs is associated with a reduced risk of heart failure hospitalization, all-cause hospitalization, and all-cause mortality, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 9 to 11 in San Francisco.

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ACC: Stressful Events Up Incidence of Acute MI

FRIDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News) -- Stressful events, including hurricanes, earthquakes, and financial crises, correlate with increased incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), according to three studies to be presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 9 to 11 in San Francisco.

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ACC: Gastric Artery Embolization Viable in Humans

FRIDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News) -- Left gastric artery embolization (GAE) seems safe and effective for weight loss in humans, according to a first-in-man study to be presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 9 to 11 in San Francisco.

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ACC: Financial Incentives Enhance Sustained Weight Loss

FRIDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News) -- Financial incentives can enhance sustained weight loss, according to a study to be presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 9 to 11 in San Francisco.

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ACC: Weight Loss Linked to Adverse Outcomes With CRT-D

THURSDAY, March 7 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with mild symptoms of heart failure implanted with cardiac resynchronization therapy with cardioverter defibrillator (CRT-D), weight loss is associated with increased risk of heart failure or death, according to a study to be presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 9 to 11 in San Francisco.

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ACC: Seasonable Variation Observed in Lipid Profiles

THURSDAY, March 7 (HealthDay News) -- Considerable seasonal variation has been observed in lipid profiles, according to a study to be presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 9 to 11 in San Francisco.

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ACC: Adult Admissions for Congenital Heart Disease Up

THURSDAY, March 7 (HealthDay News) -- Annual adult admissions for congenital heart disease are increasing and approaching that of pediatric admissions, according to a study published online March 7 in the Journal of the American Medical Association to coincide with presentation at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 9 to 11 in San Francisco.

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