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Cardiorespiratory Fitness Reduces Mortality Risk

All-cause and cardiovascular disease rates lower among those with better cardiorespiratory fitness

TUESDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- Healthy adults with good rates of cardiorespiratory fitness have a lower risk of mortality from all causes, as well as from coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease, compared to their counterparts with inferior cardiorespiratory fitness, according to a study published in the May 20 issue of JAMA.

Satoru Kodama, M.D., of the University of Tsukuba Institute of Clinical Medicine in Ibaraki, Japan, and colleagues conducted a review of 33 studies comprising 102,980 participants and 6,910 cases of all-cause mortality, and 84,323 participants with 4,485 cases of coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease.

The researchers found that participants with low cardiorespiratory fitness were more likely to die than those with high cardiorespiratory fitness (risk ratio, 1.70), and more likely to die than those with intermediate cardiorespiratory fitness (risk ratio, 1.40). Subjects with low cardiorespiratory fitness were more likely than those with high cardiorespiratory fitness (risk ratio, 1.56) and intermediate cardiorespiratory fitness (risk ratio, 1.47) to have a coronary heart disease or cardiovascular disease event, the investigators found.

"We suggest that cardiorespiratory fitness, which can be readily assessed by an exercise stress test, could be useful for prediction of coronary heart disease/cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality in a primary care medical practice," the author conclude.

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