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July 2008 Briefing - Cardiology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Cardiology for July 2008. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Pregestational Diabetes Raises Birth Defect Risk

THURSDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women with pregestational diabetes mellitus are more likely than pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus to have a child with birth defects, according to a report published online July 31 in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Joint Replacement Linked to Cardiac Complications

THURSDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Among total joint replacement surgery patients, two new risk factors -- revision surgery and bilateral joint replacement -- as well as traditional risk factors increase odds of cardiac complications, according to an article published in the July issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Endothelial Function Linked to Cardio Risk in Sedentary

THURSDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Endothelial function is significantly associated with cardiovascular risk in women in sedentary professions, with cardiorespiratory fitness being the best predictor of endothelial function, according to study findings published in the Aug. 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Genetic Factor Studied in Susceptibility to Migraine

THURSDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Carriers of the MTHFR 677C>T genotype who have migraines with aura are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, according to research published online July 30 in Neurology.

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Cyclosporine May Reduce Size of Infarct After Heart Attack

WEDNESDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- The use of cyclosporine immediately before percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with myocardial infarction may be associated with a smaller infarct, according to research from the July 31 New England Journal of Medicine.

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Smoke-Free Scotland Has Less Acute Coronary Syndrome

WEDNESDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- After legislation banning smoking in public places was introduced in Scotland, there was a decrease in the number of hospital admissions for acute coronary syndrome, of which 67 percent was accounted for by nonsmokers, according to a study in the July 31 New England Journal of Medicine.

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Higher Statin Dose Beneficial in Metabolic Syndrome

WEDNESDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- A higher dose of atorvastatin is more effective than a lower dose in reducing biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in patients with metabolic syndrome, according to a study in the Aug. 1 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Heavier Patients Visiting Cardiac Catheterization Labs

WEDNESDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- Patients weighing as much as 550 pounds are now being seen in cardiovascular catheterization laboratories, creating logistical and safety challenges, according to a study in the Aug. 1 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Heart Failure Hospitalizations at Nearly 4 Million

TUESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalizations for heart failure in the United States increased from 1979 to nearly 4 million in 2004, with more hospitalizations for the elderly and increased costs to Medicare and Medicaid, according to a study in the Aug. 5 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Use of Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Endocarditis Discouraged

TUESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Antibiotic prophylaxis should no longer routinely be given to prevent infective endocarditis in patients undergoing dental and other medical procedures, according to updated guidelines published online July 28 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The guidelines were jointly developed by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association.

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Marine-Derived n-3 Fatty Acids, Atherosclerosis Level Linked

TUESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Marine-derived n-3 fatty acids are associated with decreased intima-media thickness of the carotid artery but not coronary artery calcification in Japanese men, according to a study in the Aug. 5 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Statin Use May Decrease Cognitive Impairment

TUESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Statin use is associated with a significant decline in dementia and other cognitive impairment, according to the July 29 issue of Neurology.

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Elevated Cardiac Biomarkers Linked to Higher Mortality

TUESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Apparently healthy older adults with elevated levels of at least one of two plasma biomarkers of cardiovascular disease have a higher risk of death from cardiac and noncardiac causes, according to a study in the Aug. 5 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Heart Medications Can Affect Heart Imaging

TUESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Heart medications can modify the results of stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) by reducing or eliminating ischemia, according to a review in the Aug. 5 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Exercise Is Key for Long-Term Weight Loss

MONDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Sustaining a 10 percent or more weight loss requires fairly high levels of physical activity in combination with reduced energy intake, according to an article published in the July 28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Diabetes-Diet Link Examined in Trio of Studies

MONDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Increased consumption of fruits and vegetables may decrease the risk of diabetes mellitus, while increased consumption of fruit drinks may increase risk, and diets low in fat have no effect on development of diabetes, according to three articles published in the July 28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Sleep Apnea Cardiovascular Link Needs More Research

MONDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Despite the link between sleep-disordered breathing and cardiovascular disease, more research is needed to explain how these two conditions interact so that sleep medicine specialists and cardiologists can develop a consensus concerning best practice, according to an American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology Foundation scientific statement published online July 28 in Circulation.

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Medical Errors Have Impact After Hospital Discharge

MONDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Medical errors affect patients in the months after hospital discharge as well as during their hospital stays, leading to excess costs, deaths and hospital readmissions, according to a study published online July 25 in Health Services Research.

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ER Physicians Perceive Evolving MI Patients as High Risk

FRIDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians usually perceive patients with evolving myocardial infarction (EMI) as high risk and give them similar treatment to patients presenting with non-ST elevation myocardial infarction, according to an article published in the August issue of the Emergency Medicine Journal.

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Free Plasma Homocysteine Predicts Recurrent Heart Events

THURSDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Free plasma homocysteine levels are a significant and independent risk factor for recurrent cardiovascular events for hospitalized patients, while total plasma homocysteine levels have no predictive value, according to an article published in the July 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Drug Restores Heart Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Mice

THURSDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Treating obese mice with Captopril, an inhibitor of the renin-angiotensin system, restores insulin sensitivity in their hearts but does not affect insulin levels or glucose tolerance, researchers report in the August issue of Endocrinology.

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Statin Use May Benefit Kidney Transplant Patients

THURSDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- In kidney transplant patients, statin use may be associated with prolonged survival, according to research published online July 23 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Treatment Guidelines Issued for Pre-Diabetic Patients

THURSDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with pre-diabetes may need aggressive lifestyle management, medication, or both to reduce their risk of developing overt diabetes and cardiovascular disease, according to a Consensus Statement released July 23 in Washington, D.C., by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists.

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Mitral Regurgitation Therapy Needs Clarification

THURSDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Mitral valve repair is the preferred therapy for primary mitral regurgitation, but indications for surgery in secondary mitral regurgitation are less certain, according to a report in the July 29 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Accredited Hospitals Give Better Care for Heart Attack

THURSDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals with Society of Chest Pain Centers' accreditation are more likely than non-accredited hospitals to comply with Medicare and Medicaid core measures for acute myocardial infarction, according to a report published in the July 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Cognitive Function Poorer with Coronary Heart Disease

THURSDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Coronary heart disease is associated with poor cognitive performance in middle age, with greater declines in cognitive function among men with increased time since first coronary event, according to an article published online July 22 in the European Heart Journal.

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'Tier 4' Drugs Raise Questions About Affordability

WEDNESDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- The emergence of a fourth tier of copayment for expensive drugs calls into question how Americans are going to handle the rising costs of health care, according to a perspective article in the July 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Genes Implicated in Myopathy in Individuals on Simvastatin

WEDNESDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Variants in the SLC01B1 gene, which plays a role in the hepatic uptake of statins, may raise the risk of myopathy in individuals taking simvastatin, according to research published online July 23 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Consequences of Genetic Non-Discrimination Act Examined

WEDNESDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- The Genetic Information Non-discrimination Act (GINA), recently signed into U.S. law, creates a troublesome distinction between those at genetic risk for a disease and those with other characteristics that predispose them to a condition, according to a perspective article published in the July 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Non-Invasive Tests Superior for Predicting Cardiac Events

WEDNESDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- A disease score developed from completion of several non-invasive tests may better predict future cardiac events than a risk factor assessment such as the Framingham 10-year risk scores, researchers report in the July 29 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Physicians to Get Bonus for Electronic Prescribing

WEDNESDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors using an electronic prescriptions system will be eligible for a bonus from Medicare from 2009 onwards for four years, according to U.S. health officials.

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Risk-Prediction Tool Identifies In-Hospital Mortality Risk

WEDNESDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Application of a risk-prediction algorithm may help identify congestive heart failure patients at high risk of in-hospital mortality, according to an article published in the July 29 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Gender Affects Heart's Response to Obesity

TUESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Myocardial metabolic responses to obesity significantly vary by gender, according to the results of a study published in the July issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Imaging.

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Heart Disease Revealed in Many Adults Without Symptoms

TUESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable proportion of a group of apparently healthy individuals showed signs of coronary artery disease on coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA), according to research published in the July 29 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Non-Invasive Test Detects Heart Disease in Women

TUESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Multi-component cardiovascular magnetic resonance stress perfusion testing can accurately diagnose coronary artery disease in women, according to research published in the July issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Imaging.

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Progress Made on Road to Engineered Tissue

MONDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- The goal of engineered tissues for therapeutic revascularization is a step closer after engineered vascular networks were formed in mice using cord blood-derived progenitor cells, according to a study published in the July 18 issue of Circulation Research.

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Ratio Estimates Cardiac Risk Across Multiple Ethnic Groups

FRIDAY, July 18 (HealthDay News) -- The non-fasting apolipoprotein B100/apolipoprotein A1 (ApoB/ApoA1) ratio provides a better risk estimate for acute myocardial infarction than the low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol ratio or the total cholesterol/HDL ratio, according to an article published in the July 19 issue of The Lancet.

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Longer Sleep Linked to Higher Stroke Risk in Older Women

FRIDAY, July 18 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep duration affects the risk of stroke in postmenopausal women, with a sharply higher risk for women who sleep more than seven hours a night, according to research published online July 17 in Stroke.

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Fiber Intake in Early Pregnancy Affects Preeclampsia Risk

FRIDAY, July 18 (HealthDay News) -- Total fiber intake during the early stages of pregnancy may attenuate the risk of developing preeclampsia, according to study findings published online July 17 in the American Journal of Hypertension.

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Pseudoaneurysm After Spinal Device Migration Treatable

THURSDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- Pseudoaneurysm of the aorta due to device migration is a rare but treatable complication following placement of an anterior spinal device, according to an article published in the July issue of The Spine Journal.

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Prevention Programs Could Save $16 Billion Annually

THURSDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- Community-based disease prevention programs to increase physical activity, improve nutrition and prevent tobacco use could save the United States $16 billion a year in medical costs within five years, mostly from Medicare and private payers, according to a new report by Trust for America's Health.

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Exception Reporting Improves Pay-for-Performance Benefits

THURSDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- Pay-for-performance programs benefit from use of exclusion reporting, whereby certain patients are excluded from quality calculations, and the practice of excluding patients to disguise missed targets, known as gaming, is rare, according to study findings published in the July 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Medication Use After Heart Attack Varies By Kidney Status

THURSDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- In older heart attack survivors, the use and adherence to recommended cardiovascular medications varies by kidney status but is unlikely to explain differences in long-term outcomes, according to research published online July 9 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Medical Education Must Adapt to Changing Times

THURSDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- Medical schools must adapt their admission requirements and curricula to changes in scientific theory, and are also facing a challenge to the traditional definition of who is suited to the study of medicine, according to two articles published in the July 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Warfarin Appears Safe After Cardioembolic Stroke

THURSDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- The initiation of warfarin for anticoagulation appears to be safe soon after cardioembolic stroke, according to research published online July 14 in the Archives of Neurology.

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Mediterranean and Low-Carb Diets Show Benefits

WEDNESDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- Low-carbohydrate and Mediterranean diets appear to be safe, effective alternatives to low-fat diets for weight loss, and offer some metabolic benefits, according to research published in the July 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Prehypertension Increases Coronary Calcium Later in Life

WEDNESDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- There is a strong association between prehypertension in young adults and coronary calcium later in life, researchers report in the July 15 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Heparin Improves Outcomes After Knee Arthroscopy

WEDNESDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- One week of low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) prevents deep venous thrombosis better than graduated compression stockings in adults having knee arthroscopy, according to an article published in the July 15 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Physical Activity Falls Sharply During Adolescence

TUESDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- Between the ages of 9 and 15, physical activity fell steeply for American boys and girls in a geographically diverse sample, according to research published in the July 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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AMA Actions Fostered U.S. Medical Racial Divide

TUESDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- From the post-Civil War years to the civil rights era a century later, the American Medical Association (AMA) made decisions that helped support a division between white and black Americans in the field of medicine in the United States, according to an article in the July 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Heart Disease Linked to Worse Quality of Life

TUESDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- American adults with coronary heart disease report lower mental and physical health and quality of life compared with those without coronary heart disease, according to a report published online July 14 in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Self-Rated Cardiac Risk Linked to Cardiovascular Mortality

TUESDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiovascular mortality is lower in men -- but not in women -- who rate themselves as having a lower-than-average cardiovascular risk. Also, an integrated care intervention may improve medication adherence in older adults who are on antihypertensive and antidepressant therapy, according to two studies published in the July/August issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Iron Reduction Linked to Lower Risk of Cancer

MONDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- Reducing iron through regular phlebotomies is associated with a lower incidence of cancer, according to research published in the July 16 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Consumer-Directed Health Plans Affect Patient Choices

MONDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- Enrollees in high-deductible consumer-directed health plans may be more likely than those with other coverage to either delay seeking care or stop taking medications for chronic illnesses, according to two studies published in the July/August issue of Health Affairs.

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Flavonoid-Rich Foods Improve Cardiac Risk Factors

MONDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- Flavonoids, which are found in many commonly consumed plant foods and beverages, improve a number of different cardiovascular risk factors, according to an article published in the July issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Peptide Reduces Mortality After Heart Attack in Rats

FRIDAY, July 11 (HealthDay News) -- Early treatment with ghrelin soon after a myocardial infarction prevents an increase in cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and reduces mortality in rats, according to the results of a study published online July 3 in Endocrinology.

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Heavy Drinking Linked to Stroke and Heart Disease

FRIDAY, July 11 (HealthDay News) -- Men who drink heavily have a higher risk of death from stroke, while women who drink heavily have a higher risk of death from coronary heart disease, but light-to-moderate drinking lowers the risk of death from cardiovascular disease in both sexes, according to research published online July 10 in Stroke.

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Prevalence of Atherosclerosis in Alaska Eskimos High

FRIDAY, July 11 (HealthDay News) -- Despite their traditional diet high in fish oils that are protective against coronary artery disease, Alaska Eskimos have higher rates of atherosclerosis than the general United States population and similar risk factors for cardiovascular disease, according to a report published online July 10 in Stroke.

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Diagnosis, Treatment of Heart Attack in Pregnancy Reviewed

THURSDAY, July 10 (HealthDay News) -- Although rare, pregnancy-related heart attacks most often occur in women with cardiovascular risk factors and should be diagnosed and treated the same way as in non-pregnant patients while taking maternal and fetal factors into account, according to a review in the July 15 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Gene Mutation Associated with Atrial Fibrillation Identified

WEDNESDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- In a subgroup of patients with atrial fibrillation, the condition is hereditary and has been attributed to a gene mutation that encodes atrial natriuretic peptide, according to study findings published in the July 10 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Ventilation Does Not Improve Mortality Rate in Lung Edema

WEDNESDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- Non-invasive ventilation improves symptoms of respiratory distress but not short-term mortality in patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema, researchers report in the July 10 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Hypertension Overlaps with Insulin Resistance Mechanism

WEDNESDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- Hypertension may be the first step in the activation of matrix-degrading metalloproteinases and insulin receptor cleavage that leads to the development of insulin resistance, according to the results of an animal study published online July 7 in Hypertension.

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Health Cash Incentives for Poor People Debated

WEDNESDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- Should disadvantaged people be paid to take care of their health? That's the question of a "Head to Head" debate published online July 8 in BMJ.

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Insulin Resistance Linked to Peripheral Arterial Disease

TUESDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- Insulin resistance is strongly associated with peripheral arterial disease, and modifies the relationship between markers of inflammation and peripheral arterial disease, according to research published online June 16 in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Continuing Drug Reduces Death After Heart Failure

WEDNESDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- Patients hospitalized for heart failure who continue to receive beta-blocker therapy after discharge have a lower risk of death than patients who withdraw from treatment or do not receive treatment, researchers report in the July 15 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Ankle Brachial Index Predicts Cardiovascular Risk

TUESDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- When a measurement of the ankle brachial index is combined with the Framingham risk score, it may result in a more accurate predictor of cardiovascular events and mortality, according to a report published in the July 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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α-Linolenic Acid Cuts Risk of Myocardial Infarction

TUESDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- Increased intake of the omega-3 fatty acid α-linolenic acid is associated with decreased risk of non-fatal acute myocardial infarction and increased intake of the omega-6 fatty acid linoleic acid is associated with reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, according to two articles published online July 7 in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association and Hypertension.

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Aerobic Training Reverses Metabolic Syndrome Risk Factors

TUESDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- Patients randomized to aerobic interval training versus an equivalent amount of continuous moderate exercise experienced greater improvements in aerobic capacity and reversed more risk factors of the metabolic syndrome, according to an article published online July 7 in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association. In a related study, full scale implementation of 11 prevention measures prevented up to two-thirds of myocardial infarctions and one-third of strokes.

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Hypertension Treatment Beneficial in Very Elderly

TUESDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment of very elderly patients for high blood pressure may slightly lower the risk of dementia but is clearly beneficial in reducing strokes and mortality, according to research published online July 8 in The Lancet Neurology.

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Clinical Report Emphasizes Pediatric Lipid Screening

TUESDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatricians should focus on cholesterol screenings for children and improving lipid and lipoprotein concentrations to reduce the long-term risk of cardiovascular disease, according to a clinical report published in the July issue of Pediatrics. The report -- "Lipid Screening and Cardiovascular Health in Childhood" -- replaces the 1998 policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics on cholesterol in childhood.

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Fat Hormone Predicts Coronary Artery Calcium

TUESDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- High levels of the hormone leptin secreted by fat cells and a measure of insulin resistance are strong predictors of high coronary artery calcification in healthy asymptomatic adults at risk of cardiovascular disease, according to the results of a study in the July 15 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Resveratrol May Offer Some Dietary Restriction Benefits

MONDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- In mice, adding resveratrol to the diet leads to gene expression patterns similar to those seen in dietary restriction, as well as decreased inflammation and increased aortic elasticity, but not increased longevity when begun at midlife, according to research published in the Aug. 6 issue of Cell Metabolism.

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Survival Benefit Seen with Extracorporeal CPR

MONDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was associated with improved survival rates at discharge, one month and one year following in-hospital cardiac arrest, according to an article published online July 7 in The Lancet.

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Electrocardiography Effective in Pre-Athletic Screenings

MONDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- Among people seeking to obtain clinical eligibility for participation in competitive sports, exercise electrocardiography (ECG) screening can identify silent cardiovascular disorders that are undetected by resting ECG, according to the results of a study published July 3 in BMJ Online First.

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Retinal Signs Predict Risk of Heart Disease in Women

THURSDAY, July 3 (HealthDay News) -- Retinal vascular caliber predicts the risk of coronary heart disease in women, but does not add much to the predictive ability of the Framingham risk score, according to a report in the July 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Endomyocardial Fibrosis Common in Mozambique

WEDNESDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- In a rural area of Mozambique, endomyocardial fibrosis is common among all age groups, but may not be representative of the country as a whole. Echocardiography can identify the condition while it's still asymptomatic, researchers report in the July 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Combo Therapy Provides No Extra Benefit in Cardiac Arrest

WEDNESDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who receive advanced life support, the administration of vasopressin and epinephrine does not improve outcomes compared to administration of epinephrine alone, according to the results of a study published in the July 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Environmental Factors In Utero May Trigger Adult Illness

WEDNESDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- The long latency period between exposure to an environmental trigger and cancer has already been recognized, but the same phenomenon may apply to chronic diseases such as metabolic disease and osteoporosis, with exposure to triggers in utero and early life causing disease in adulthood, according to a report published in the July 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Exercise Capacity Impaired in Survivors of Heart Procedure

WEDNESDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- Survivors of the Fontan procedure, performed to correct anomalies in a functional single ventricle, still have deficits in exercise capacity but generally are doing well, according to three studies published in the July 8 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Hormone Therapy Modifies Heart Risk of Lipoprotein(a)

WEDNESDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- In older women, the relationship between high lipoprotein(a) levels and cardiovascular events is modified by hormone therapy, according to study findings published in the July 8 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Revascularization After Heart Attack Reduces Mortality

WEDNESDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who undergo invasive coronary revascularization during hospitalization for an acute myocardial infarction have a lower risk of death and heart failure than patients who do not undergo the procedure, researchers report in the July 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Risk Level Affects Coronary Syndrome Treatment in Women

TUESDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- In men and high-risk women with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE ACS), an invasive strategy has a comparable benefit for reducing the odds of myocardial infarction, rehospitalization with acute coronary syndrome or death, although a conservative strategy seems to be more effective for low-risk women, according to study findings published in the July 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Drug Reduces Fracture Risk in Men with Heart Failure

TUESDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- Spironolactone, which has been shown to preserve skeletal strength in animals, is associated with a reduced risk of fracture in men with congestive heart failure, according to a report in the July 8 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Liver Disease in Overweight Children Linked to More Risks

TUESDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are more likely to have metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk factors than overweight children without NAFLD, according to research published online June 30 in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Population-Based Programs Key to Battling Obesity

TUESDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- Population-based initiatives aimed at preventing excess weight gain complement clinical preventive strategies and treatment for obese people, according to an article published online June 30 in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Cholesterol Level Linked to Poor Memory in Middle Aged

TUESDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- Middle-aged individuals with low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels are at higher risk of poor memory and memory decline than individuals with high levels of HDL-C, according to the results of a study published online June 30 in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

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