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March 2017 Briefing - Cardiology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Cardiology for March 2017. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

90 Percent of U.S. Physicians Satisfied With Career Choice

FRIDAY, March 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Nine out of 10 American doctors are happy with their choice of profession, even though they have some challenges, according to an American Medical Association (AMA) survey of 1,200 doctors, residents, and medical students, conducted in February.

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Church-Based Program Sings the Praises of Healthy Eating

FRIDAY, March 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Implementing a 12-week Body and Soul program that includes demonstration of healthy recipes and peer counseling is associated with increases in weekly servings of fruit and vegetables among African-American church members, according to a community case study published online March 23 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Vertical Integration Insurance Products of Higher Quality

FRIDAY, March 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Insurance products offered by hospitals and health systems, known as vertical integration, are generally of higher quality than other contracts, according to a study published in the March issue of Health Affairs.

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Apixaban Tx Cost in A-Fib Meets U.S. Norms for Reasonable Value

THURSDAY, March 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Apixaban therapy is cost-effective for atrial fibrillation from the perspective of the U.S. health care system, according to a study published online March 29 in JAMA Cardiology.

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Invasive Heart Center Admission Best for Cardiac Arrest Survival

THURSDAY, March 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Admission to an invasive heart center and regional performance of acute coronary angiography (CAG)/percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) are associated with improved survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients, according to a study published online March 29 in the European Heart Journal.

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Target-Vessel Failure Rate Similar for Scaffold, Stent in PCI

THURSDAY, March 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), the rate of target-vessel failure does not differ significantly for those receiving a bioresorbable vascular scaffold or a metallic stent, according to a study published online March 29 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Gum Disease, Tooth Loss Tied to Higher Mortality in Older Women

THURSDAY, March 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Tooth loss is associated with increased risks of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and death in older women, according to a study published online March 29 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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DAPT Cessation Patterns Vary With Diabetes Status After PCI

WEDNESDAY, March 29, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) after percutaneous coronary intervention with a drug-eluting stent (DES), DAPT cessation is significantly lower in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), according to a study published in the March 27 issue of JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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TV Ads for ACA Enrollment Linked to Decline in Uninsured Rates

TUESDAY, March 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The volume of insurance advertisements during the first Affordable Care Act enrollment period correlated with change in uninsurance rates, with a higher volume of television advertisements linked to declines in uninsurance, according to a study published online March 15 in Health Affairs.

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Seventeen States Require AED Installation in Some Schools

TUESDAY, March 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer than half of U.S. states require schools to install automated external defibrillators (AEDs), according to a study published in the April 4 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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ACP Issues Challenge to Cut Task Burden and Put Patients First

TUESDAY, March 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- In a position paper published online March 28 in the Annals of Internal Medicine, recommendations are presented to address the impact of administrative tasks and reduce the administrative burden on clinicians.

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Paid Malpractice Claims Cut in Half From 1992 to 2014 in U.S.

MONDAY, March 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- From 1992 to 2014 there was a decrease in the rate of malpractice claims paid on behalf of physicians in the United States, but mean compensation amounts increased, according to a study published online March 27 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Smoking Ups Long-Term Risks From Radiotherapy in Breast CA

MONDAY, March 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with breast cancer, the absolute risks associated with modern radiotherapy are higher for smokers than nonsmokers, according to research published online March 20 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Genetic Hyperglycemia Raises Risk of Coronary Artery Disease

MONDAY, March 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Genetic predisposition to hyperglycemia raises the odds of coronary artery disease (CAD), independent of type 2 diabetes and other CAD risk factors, according to research published online March 15 in Diabetes Care.

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Long-Term Thrombolytic Tx No Benefit in Intermediate-Risk PE

MONDAY, March 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients with intermediate- to high-risk pulmonary embolism (PE), thrombolytic treatment with tenecteplase does not affect long-term mortality rates or rates of other complications, according to a study published in the March 28 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Physical Function Should Be Goal of Care for Elderly CVD Patients

FRIDAY, March 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiac rehabilitation and the importance of physical function should be emphasized among older adults with cardiovascular disease, according to an American Heart Association scientific statement published online March 23 in Circulation.

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Heterogeneous Association for Alcohol, CVD Presentation

THURSDAY, March 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- There are heterogeneous associations between the level of alcohol consumption and initial presentation of cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online March 22 in The BMJ.

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30-Day Mortality Down During Joint Commission Survey Weeks

THURSDAY, March 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Patients admitted to the hospital during The Joint Commission on-site inspections (surveys) have reduced mortality compared to that seen during non-survey weeks, according to research published online March 20 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Statin Intolerance Tied to Increased Risk of Recurrent MI

THURSDAY, March 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For Medicare beneficiaries after myocardial infarction (MI) hospitalization, statin intolerance is associated with increased risk of recurrent MI and coronary heart disease (CHD) events, according to a study published in the March 21 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Global Tobacco Control Treaty Has Reduced Smoking Rates

THURSDAY, March 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- After 180 countries agreed to a global tobacco control treaty in 2005, there was a 2.55 percent decrease in smoking worldwide during the next decade, according to a study published online March 21 in The Lancet Public Health.

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AHA/ACC Update Guidelines for Valvular Heart Disease in Adults

WEDNESDAY, March 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology have updated guidelines for the management of patients with valvular heart disease, according to a report published online March 15 in Circulation.

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Multiple Dosing Mitigates ASA Hyporesponsiveness After CABG

WEDNESDAY, March 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) hyporesponsiveness after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery can be overcome by multiple dosing, according to a study published online March 7 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Black, Asian Medical Students Less Likely to Be AΩA Members

TUESDAY, March 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Black and Asian medical students are less likely to be members of the Alpha Omega Alpha (AΩA) honor society than white students, according to a study published online March 6 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Inappropriate Use of PCI Drops Under Increased Scrutiny in N.Y.

TUESDAY, March 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- From 2010 to 2014 there was a decrease in the rate of inappropriate percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs) performed in New York State, according to a study published in the March 14 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Impaired Orthostatic BP Recovery Linked to Falls in Older Adults

MONDAY, March 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Delayed recovery orthostatic hypotension (OH) and sustained OH are associated with increased risk of falls among community-dwelling older adults, according to a study published in the March issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Los Angeles eConsult Program Can Reduce Wait Times

FRIDAY, March 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of an electronic system for provision of specialty care was rapidly adopted in Los Angeles, and it can reduce wait times to see specialists, according to a study published in the March issue of Health Affairs.

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Continuing Statins Up to Surgery May Improve CABG Outcomes

FRIDAY, March 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery patients taking statins may improve their survival odds if the medication is continued up to the day of surgery, according to a study published online March 16 in the Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

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Shorter Length of Stay Tied to Earlier Readmission for Seniors

FRIDAY, March 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For older patients discharged from the hospital to post-acute care (PAC) facilities, shorter length of hospital stay is associated with earlier readmission, according to a study published online March 3 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Patients Have High Confidence in Self-Testing INR

FRIDAY, March 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Most patients have high confidence in self-testing their international normalized ratio (INR), according to a study published online Feb. 23 in the Journal of Clinical Nursing.

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Appeals Court Upholds Restaurant Salt Warning

THURSDAY, March 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- An Empire State appeals court has upheld the New York City health department rule that requires restaurants to warn customers about menu items that exceed the 2,300 mg daily recommended sodium limit, according to a report from the American Medical Association (AMA).

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High-Intensity Aerobic Exercise May Help Reverse Cellular Aging

THURSDAY, March 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- High-intensity exercise training can reverse some manifestations of aging in the body's protein function, according to a study published in the March issue of Cell Metabolism.

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Women Underrepresented Among Grand Rounds Speakers

WEDNESDAY, March 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Women seem to be underrepresented among academic grand rounds (GR) speakers, according to a research letter published online March 6 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Noninvasive Imaging Deemed Adequate in Prediction of MACE

WEDNESDAY, March 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Computed tomography (CT) angiography and CT myocardial stress perfusion imaging have similar prediction of two-year major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) as combined invasive coronary angiography (ICA) and stress single photon emission CT myocardial perfusion imaging, according to a study published online March 14 in Radiology.

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Wearable Radiation Safety Devices Offer Some Protection

WEDNESDAY, March 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Leaded glasses can offer some radiation protection of the ocular lenses, while a radioabsorbent surgical cap offers minimal protection of the brain, according to a study published in the March 13 issue of JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Support for Health Law Up to 48 Percent in February

TUESDAY, March 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Support for the health law is increasing, with most Americans feeling that Medicaid should continue as it is today, according to a report published by Kaiser Health News.

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Many A-Fib Patients Not Getting Appropriate Anticoagulation Rx

TUESDAY, March 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Many patients with atrial fibrillation who experience a stroke may not have been on appropriate anticoagulation therapy, according to a study published in the March 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Omega-3 Supplements May Benefit Heart Failure Patients

TUESDAY, March 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Prescription of omega-3 supplements may benefit some patients with myocardial infarction (MI) and patients with heart failure, according to a new report published online March 13 in Circulation.

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Adverse CV Events Up Post Failure of Fertility Therapy

TUESDAY, March 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Failed fertility therapy may increase risk of long-term adverse cardiovascular events, according to a study published online March 13 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Risk of Heart Failure Up for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

TUESDAY, March 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have increased risk of heart failure, according to a study published in the March 14 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Higher Spending by Physicians Not Tied to Better Outcomes

MONDAY, March 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Medicare patients treated by higher-spending physicians are just as likely to be readmitted or die within 30 days of being admitted to the hospital as patients treated by doctors who order fewer or less-expensive tests and treatments, according to a study published online March 13 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Contraceptive Use Up for Women With Congenital Heart Disease

MONDAY, March 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Women with congenital heart disease (CHD) use a spectrum of contraceptive methods, with barrier methods and oral contraception (OC) preferred, according to a study published in the March 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Lowering Cost of Healthy Foods Increases Consumption

FRIDAY, March 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Governments could boost the consumption of healthy food by making it less expensive, as well as requiring that unhealthier food be more expensive, according to research published online March 1 in PLOS ONE.

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Better Outcomes in T2DM With No Delay in Tx Intensification

FRIDAY, March 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes, not delaying intensification of oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) is associated with greater reductions in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and with reduced risks of cardiovascular events and amputations, according to a study published online Feb. 17 in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.

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Cardiometabolic Risk Factors Not Always Seen With Obesity

THURSDAY, March 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Almost 10 percent of obese people have no cardiometabolic risk factors (CRFs), according to research published March 9 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

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ACA's Medicaid Expansion May Pose Challenges to Timely Care

THURSDAY, March 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People living in states that expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) are less likely to be uninsured or struggling with the strain of unpaid medical bills, but they also seem to have increased difficulty receiving timely care, according to research published in the March 9 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Diet Tied to Large Proportion of Cardiometabolic Deaths

WEDNESDAY, March 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly half of all deaths from heart disease, stroke, and diabetes in the United States are associated with diets that lack certain foods and nutrients, such as vegetables, and exceed optimal levels of others, like salt, according to a study published in the March 7 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Vildagliptin, Metformin Have Different Effects on BP in T2DM

WEDNESDAY, March 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes, vildagliptin lowers blood pressure (BP) and elevates heart rate (HR), while metformin increases HR with no effect on BP during intraduodenal (ID) glucose infusion, according to a study published online March 3 in Diabetes Care.

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Fewer Americans Actively Trying to Lose Weight

TUESDAY, March 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- One in every three people in the United States is now obese, compared with one in five 20 years ago, but many have given up on trying to lose the excess weight, according to a research letter published in the March 7 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Diabetes Ups Risk of Adverse Outcomes in Chronic Heart Failure

TUESDAY, March 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For outpatients with chronic heart failure, diabetes is associated with increased risk of one-year adverse outcomes, according to a study published online March 2 in Diabetes Care.

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Republicans Introduce Affordable Care Act Replacement

TUESDAY, March 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- An initial Republican replacement for the Affordable Care Act was formally introduced in the House of Representatives on Monday.

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Few Patients With Resistant High BP Take Rx As Prescribed

TUESDAY, March 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Only 20 percent of patients with resistant hypertension take all the medicine they're prescribed, according to research published online March 6 in Hypertension.

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Most Health Care Providers Can Offer Cost Estimate

MONDAY, March 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Most provider organizations can offer a cost estimate, although few patients request one, according to a report published by Becker's Hospital CFO.

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Index Predicts 10-, 14-Year Mortality in Older Adults

MONDAY, March 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- An 11-factor index predicts 10- and 14-year mortality with excellent calibration and discrimination among community-dwelling U.S. adults aged ≥65 years, according to a study published online Feb. 21 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Judgement Bias in Medical Device Recall Decisions

FRIDAY, March 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The characteristics of the signal in user feedback of adverse events associated with medical devices and the situated context of decision makers correlate with judgement bias in reacting to these adverse events, according to research published online Jan. 29 in Production and Operations Management.

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Overall, 8.8 Percent of U.S. Population Uninsured in 2016

THURSDAY, March 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Overall, 8.8 percent of individuals of all ages were uninsured in the first nine months of 2016, which marked a nonsignificant reduction from 2015, according to a Feb. 14 report from the National Center for Health Statistics.

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Care Setting Affects Management of Carotid Artery Stenosis

THURSDAY, March 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals with a diagnosis of carotid artery stenosis, the likelihood of undergoing procedural management is increased for those treated in a fee-for-service system compared with a salary-based setting, according to a study published online March 1 in JAMA Surgery.

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Subdural Hematomas Rising Alongside Antithrombotic Use

WEDNESDAY, March 1, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Antithrombotic drug use is associated with increased risk of subdural hematoma, according to a study published in the Feb. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Complication Rates Often Higher in Youth With T2DM Versus T1DM

WEDNESDAY, March 1, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Young people with type 2 diabetes are much more likely to show signs of complications from the disease than those who have type 1 diabetes, according to a study published in the Feb. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Physician's Briefing
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