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Review Supports Elevated Risk of CHD Even With Prehypertension

Trials needed to clarify the efficacy of blood pressure reduction in pre-HTN

Review Supports Elevated Risk of CHD Even With Prehypertension

WEDNESDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Prehypertension, especially high-range prehypertension, is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), according to a meta-analysis published in the July 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Li Shen, Ph.D., from Zhejiang University in Hangzhou, China, and colleagues conducted a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies to examine the correlation between baseline prehypertension and the risk for CHD. Eighteen studies were included, with a median follow-up period of 8.8 years, which consisted of 934,106 participants and 14,952 cases.

The researchers found that prehypertension correlated with a significantly increased risk of CHD (relative risk, 1.36). Risk estimates were further classified into low-range (120/80 to 129/84 mm Hg) and high-range prehypertension (130/85 to 139/89 mm Hg) in eight studies comprising 12 cohorts. High-range prehypertension (relative risk, 1.53), but not low-range prehypertension (relative risk, 1.16; P = 0.019) correlated with a significantly increased risk of CHD.

"In conclusion, prehypertension is associated with a significantly increased risk for developing CHD, particularly high-range prehypertension," the authors write. "Further well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed to clarify the efficacy of blood pressure reduction in subjects with prehypertension."

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