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Framingham Risk Score Is Higher in Psoriasis Patients

Patients with psoriasis have an intermediate risk of developing major cardiovascular events

TUESDAY, Dec. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with psoriasis have an intermediate risk of developing major cardiovascular events as per the Framingham risk score, according to research published in the Dec. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Paolo Gisondi, M.D., of the University of Verona in Italy, and colleagues conducted a cross-sectional study of 234 patients with chronic plaque psoriasis, and 234 with a dermatologic disorder other than psoriasis, who were recruited from patients attending their dermatology clinic from June to December 2009. The Framingham risk score was estimated in the study population.

The researchers found that the prevalence of diabetes and smoking was greater in patients with psoriasis than in controls, as were mean systolic blood pressure and total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Cardiovascular risk increased linearly with age and was higher compared with controls only for patients age 50 and older. The presence of psoriasis was independently associated with a higher Framingham score but there was no correlation between severity or duration of psoriasis and cardiovascular score. Patients between 50 and 60 years of age had 5.3 and 11.2 percent absolute risks of developing a first major cardiovascular event at five and 10 years, respectively, which is considered an intermediate cardiovascular risk.

"The main finding of the study was that the Framingham risk score is [significantly] higher in patients with chronic plaque psoriasis than in age- and gender-matched controls," the authors write.

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