Health Tip: Preventing Low Blood Sugar

It can occur in non-diabetics

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(HealthDay News) -- If you tend to feel shaky, dizzy or nauseous in the hours between eating, you may have a condition known as reactive hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar.

Although low blood sugar is commonly thought to occur only in diabetics, an occasional experience is common in non-diabetics. The exact cause is unknown, but some research points to a sensitivity in some people to the body's release of epinephrine, a hormone.

To avoid low blood sugar, the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse recommends eating small meals or snacks about every three hours. With a constant source of energy, the body can maintain a normal level of glucose (blood sugar). Regular exercise and a varied diet that includes plenty of fruits and vegetables, portions of whole grain bread and rice, proteins including lean meats, and dairy are also recommended.

Foods and drinks high in sugar -- like sodas and sweetened fruit drinks -- should be avoided, especially on an empty stomach.

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