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Health Tip: Dementia and Driving

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(HealthDay News) -- Dementia is a group of symptoms associated with a decline in memory or thinking skills.

Because the progression of dementia varies, deciding when a person is no longer able to drive safely can be difficult, says the National Center on Caregiving.

For caregivers and those who have a loved one with dementia, the center suggests:

  • If the person has mild dementia, have driving skills evaluated immediately.
  • If the person with dementia passes, continue to have driving skills evaluated every 6 months.
  • Watch for behavioral signs, such as disorientation and difficulty processing.
  • Watch for poor driving behavior, such as drifting or incorrect signaling.
  • Encourage the person to drive on familiar roads, and avoid nighttime driving.

The NCC also suggests reducing the need to drive by arranging alternative transportation.

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