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March 2011 Briefing - Cosmetic Surgery

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Cosmetic Surgery for March 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Online Health Records Less Used by Minorities, Poor

WEDNESDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- Online personal health records (PHRs) are less frequently used by racial or ethnic minorities and patients with low annual income, according to a study published in the March 28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Reduced Hours for Trainees Has Had Little Effect in U.S.

THURSDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Reducing work hours for doctors in training to less than 80 per week has had little impact on patient outcomes or postgraduate training in the United States, according to a literature review published online March 22 in BMJ.

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Surgery Improves Quality of Life After Facial Paralysis

WEDNESDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with paralytic lagophthalmos showed improved quality of life (QOL) following static periocular reanimation, according to a study published in the March/April issue of the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery.

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ASPS: Cosmetic Plastic Surgery Procedures Up in Men

MONDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- More men appear to be undergoing cosmetic plastic surgery procedures, with overall procedures among men up 2 percent in 2010 as compared to 2009, according to statistics released March 21 by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

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Professional Values of U.S. and U.K. Doctors Examined

THURSDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- A core of professional values exists among doctors in the United States and the United Kingdom, though significant differences exist in how these values are expressed and prioritized, according to a study published online March 7 in BMJ Quality & Safety.

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Ethnic Differences Seen in Academic Measures for U.K. Docs

WEDNESDAY, March 9 (HealthDay News) -- United Kingdom-trained physicians and medical students with ethnic minority backgrounds tend to underperform academically compared to their white peers, according to a meta-analysis published online March 8 in BMJ.

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Pharmacological Meta-Analyses Rarely Report Disclosures

TUESDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News) -- Meta-analyses of pharmacological treatments rarely include information addressing primary study funding and conflicts of interest (COIs) of the authors for the included randomized control trials (RCTs), according to a study published in the March 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Majority of Pediatric Burn Admissions Due to Scalding

TUESDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News) -- Although admission rates for burn injury declined from 1983 to 2008, more than half of burn-injury hospital admissions for children younger than 5 years of age in Western Australia are due to scalding, according to a study published online March 7 in Pediatrics.

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Physician's Briefing