COVID-19 Tied to Higher Risk for Pregnancy Complications

Infection tied to worse outcomes for severe maternal morbidity, preterm birth, and venous thromboembolism

COVID-19 Tied to Higher Risk for Pregnancy Complications
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MONDAY, March 28, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is associated with an increased risk for perinatal complications, according to a study published online March 21 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Assiamira Ferrara, M.D., Ph.D., from Kaiser Permanente Northern California in Oakland, and colleagues assessed the risk for perinatal complications associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection and identified factors associated with hospitalizations. The analysis included 43,886 pregnant individuals with longitudinal electronic health record data from preconception to delivery who delivered between March 1, 2020, and March 16, 2021.

The researchers found that after adjusting for demographic characteristics, comorbidities, and smoking status, individuals with SARS-CoV-2 infection had a higher risk for severe maternal morbidity (hazard ratio [HR], 2.45), preterm birth (<37 weeks; HR, 2.08), and venous thromboembolism (HR, 3.08) versus individuals without SARS-CoV-2. There was also an association between SARS-CoV-2 infection and an increased risk for medically indicated preterm birth (HR, 2.56); spontaneous preterm birth (HR, 1.61); and early (HR, 2.52), moderate (HR, 2.18), and late (HR, 1.95) preterm birth. Hospitalization occurred in 5.7 percent of individuals with SARS-CoV-2 infection. An increased risk for hospitalization was seen among women with pregestational diabetes (HR, 7.03) and Asian or Pacific Islander (HR, 2.33) and Black (HR, 3.14) race and ethnicity.

"This information can help inform treatment of the infection during pregnancy, aid patients in understanding the risks of these complications, and support the recommendation for vaccination of pregnant individuals and those planning conception," the authors write.

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