January 2009 Briefing - Critical Care

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Critical Care for January 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Motility Studies Useful in Neonatal Dysphagia

FRIDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- In neonatal dysphagia, pharyngoesophageal motility studies combined with clinical observations during evaluation can play a useful role in the development of well-structured multidisciplinary feeding strategies, researchers report in the February issue of the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition.

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FX06 Cuts Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Injury

THURSDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- In patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention to treat acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), using intravenous FX06, a fibrin-derived naturally occurring peptide, significantly reduces the necrotic core zone, but does not change scar size or troponin I levels, according to study findings published online Jan. 28 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Clopidogrel/Proton Pump Inhibitor Combo Questioned

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Heart attack patients who take both clopidogrel and a proton pump inhibitor other than pantoprazole have an increased risk of reinfarction and may lose the beneficial effects of clopidogrel, according to research published online Jan. 28 in CMAJ, the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

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Glucose Control Important for Acute Coronary Syndrome

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiologists should be aware of the link between admission hyperglycemia and increased mortality in patients with acute coronary syndrome, according to an article published Feb. 3 in a supplement to the Journal of the American College of Cardiology devoted to glucose issues.

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Insulin Therapy Linked to Better Pediatric ICU Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The use of insulin to target blood glucose to age-adjusted normal fasting values was associated with improved outcomes in infants and children in intensive care, according to research published online Jan. 27 in The Lancet.

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BNP Levels Not a Superior Guide for Heart Failure Therapy

TUESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Using N-terminal brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels to guide heart failure therapy does not improve overall clinical outcomes or patient quality of life compared to using symptoms to guide treatment, according to a report published in the Jan. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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AHA Supports Omega-6 for Possible Heart Protection

TUESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The American Heart Association recommends that at least 5 to 10 percent of individuals' calories should come from omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, according to a science advisory published online Jan. 26 in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Clinical Information Technology Leads to Safer Hospitals

TUESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals that make use of clinical information technology to automate notes, records, order entry and clinical decision support have lower mortality rates, fewer complications and also save money, according to a report published in the Jan. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Meditation Practice Linked to Less Pain Sensitivity

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Experience in Zen meditation is associated with reduced pain sensitivity, a finding supporting the value of mindfulness-based meditation, according to research published in the January issue of Psychosomatic Medicine.

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Obstructive Sleep Apnea Linked to Insulin Resistance

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with insulin resistance in obesity and also independently of obesity, which may increase the risk of developing other chronic conditions, according to two studies published in the February issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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AHA Reveals Top 10 Heart Disease Research Advances

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The American Heart Association (AHA) has released its annual top 10 list of advances in research into heart disease and stroke, with a study on the impact of smoke-free legislation on hospitalizations for acute coronary syndrome topping the list.

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Acute Geriatric Units Improve Elderly Care

FRIDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly patients hospitalized with acute medical disorders are more likely to live at home after discharge if they are treated in acute geriatric wards rather than conventional hospital care, according to research published online Jan. 22 in BMJ.

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Mortality Not Down in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

FRIDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Despite some assertions to the contrary, mortality from acute respiratory distress syndrome has not significantly decreased since publication of a consensus definition in 1994, according to a report published in the February issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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New Guidelines Issued for Brain Hemorrhage Management

FRIDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- New recommendations summarize the best available evidence for treatment of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and identify areas of future research, according to a statement published online Jan. 22 in Stroke.

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Baby with Seizures Had Rickets and Anemia

THURSDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A 9-month-old baby who presented with seizures and a bulging fontanelle was diagnosed as having rickets due to vitamin D deficiency, iron deficiency anemia and severe protein-calorie malnutrition, according to a case report published in the Jan. 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Preterm Infants May Be Exposed to Toxic Additives in Meds

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- After birth, premature babies are exposed to multiple, potentially toxic excipients, suggesting that strategies are needed to reduce the excipient load, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood: Fetal and Neonatal Edition.

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Engineered Skin Improves Healing of Burn Wounds

MONDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Tissue-engineered skin made from stem cells improves wound healing in a pig burn model, according to a study published online Dec. 22 in Artificial Organs.

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Sepsis Treatment Not Tied to Benefit in Premature Infants

FRIDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The prophylactic use of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor was not associated with a reduction in systemic sepsis or mortality in extremely premature infants, according to research published in the Jan. 17 issue of The Lancet.

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Presumed Consent Can't Fully Explain Rise in Organ Donation

THURSDAY, Jan. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Although presumed consent may play an important role in an increased rate of organ donation, other factors may also have an impact, according to research published online Jan. 14 in BMJ.

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Diet High in DHA May Benefit Girls Born Prematurely

TUESDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- In premature girls, a diet containing high-dose docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) was associated with improved scores at 18 months' corrected age on a test of mental development, according to research published in the Jan. 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Congestion Therapy's Link to Respiratory Distress Studied

TUESDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- In ferrets, exposure to Vicks VapoRub was associated with effects that might explain the respiratory symptoms seen in some young children given the product intranasally, according to research published in the January issue of Chest.

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Model Demonstrates Ability to Predict Aneurysm Rupture

THURSDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- A model of aneurysm rupture derived from measuring hundreds of aneurysms showed good accuracy in identifying the rupture status of another cohort of patients, according to research published in the January issue of the Journal of Neurosurgery.

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Lancet Lambastes U.N.'s Inability to Protect Innocents

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The current conflict between Israel and Hamas in Gaza highlights the United Nations' continuing failure to protect innocent civilians in war-torn regions, according to an editorial published online Jan. 7 in The Lancet.

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Statins Reduce Delirium Risk After Cardiac Surgery

TUESDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Statin treatment before cardiac bypass surgery reduces the risk of postoperative delirium, particularly in elderly patients, according to a report in the January issue of Anesthesiology.

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Gene Hypermethylation Seen in Lung Cancer Patients

FRIDAY, Jan. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Promoter methylation in certain genes may point to an increased risk of lung cancer in individuals, according to research published in the Jan. 1 issue of Cancer Research.

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Decontamination Reduces Death in Intensive Care Unit

THURSDAY, Jan. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Decontaminating the digestive tract or the oropharynx with antibiotics to avoid infection reduces the likelihood of death in critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU), according to an article in the Jan. 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Physician's Briefing