See What HealthDay Can Do For You
Contact Us

January 2015 Briefing - Critical Care

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Critical Care for January 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Benefits Package Important for Attracting, Retaining Staff

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An appropriately-targeted benefits package is crucial for attracting and retaining employees, according to an article published Jan. 22 in Medical Economics.

More Information

Chlorhexidine Bathing Doesn't Cut Health Care-Linked Infections

TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For critically ill patients, chlorhexidine bathing does not reduce health-care-associated infections, according to a study published in the Jan. 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Sedation Protocol Doesn't Reduce Duration of Ventilation in PICU

TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For children in pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) mechanically ventilated for acute respiratory failure, the use of a sedation protocol does not reduce the duration of mechanical ventilation, according to a study published in the Jan. 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Metabolic Syndrome May Raise Death Risk Postangiography

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For postangiography patients, metabolic syndrome is associated with increased mortality, especially in patients with stable angina, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Risks for Ebola Virus-Infected Pregnant Women Discussed

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Ebola virus-infected pregnant women are at risk for adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, according to an article published online Jan. 14 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Physicians Rank the Best EHR Systems of 2014

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians have ranked electronic health record (EHR) systems based on five key performance areas, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

More Information

Survival Rates for Extremely Premature Infants on Rise

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- More extremely premature U.S. infants -- those born after only 22 to 28 weeks of gestation -- are surviving, according to a new study published in the Jan. 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Incidence of PE Hospitalizations Rises From 2001 to 2010

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of hospitalizations for pulmonary embolism (PE) increased from 2001 to 2010, and a pattern of seasonal variation can be seen in PE hospitalizations, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Cardiovascular Risks of Pneumonia May Linger for Years

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Older patients hospitalized with pneumonia appear to have an increased risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, or death from coronary heart disease for years afterward, according to a new study published in the Jan. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Collaboration Between Med Students Cuts Diagnostic Errors

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For fourth-year medical students, working collaboratively is associated with a reduction in diagnostic errors, according to a research letter published in the Jan. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Few Patients Fill High-Intensity Statin Rx After CHD Discharge

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Only about a quarter of Medicare beneficiaries fill a high-intensity statin prescription after discharge from hospitalization for a coronary heart disease (CHD) event, according to a study published in the Jan. 27 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Most Docs Work 40 to 60 Hours Per Week

FRIDAY, Jan. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians work long hours, with most working 40 to 60 hours per week and a considerable proportion working 61 to 80 or more hours per week, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

More Information

Four-Times Daily ASA More Effective in Post-CABG Patients

FRIDAY, Jan. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, four-times daily acetyl-salicylic acid (ASA) seems more effective than once-daily 81 mg or 325 mg ASA, according to a study published online Dec. 27 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Patient-Selected Audio Therapy May Ease Pediatric Post-Op Pain

THURSDAY, Jan. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Going through a surgery often means postoperative pain for children, but listening to their favorite music might help ease their discomfort, according to a new study published online Jan. 3 in Pediatric Surgery International.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Rates of Hospital-Acquired Infection on the Decline

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Rates of many types of hospital-acquired infections are on the decline, but more work is needed to protect patients, according to a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report.

More Information

Working Long Hours? Beware Risky Alcohol Consumption

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Working long hours may raise the risk for alcohol abuse, according to a new study of more than 300,000 people from 14 countries. The report was published online Jan. 13 in The BMJ.

Full Text
Editorial

Study Examines Trends in Tracheotomy Malpractice Suits

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Malpractice litigation relating to complications from tracheotomies can result in high award amounts, especially in pediatric cases, according to a study published online Dec. 18 in Head & Neck.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Rationale for Overriding Best Practice Alerts Highly Diverse

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A wide range of physician-reported rationales drive overrides of best practice alerts (BPAs) for blood product transfusions, according to research published in the January issue of the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Guidelines Presented for Clinical Documentation in 21st Century

TUESDAY, Jan. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Guidelines have been developed for clinical documentation and interrelated issues. The position paper has been published online Jan. 13 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

No Negative Consequences of Guidelines for Antibiotic Therapy

TUESDAY, Jan. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For children with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), there are no negative consequences associated with use of guideline-recommended antibiotic therapy, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

AMA Reports on How Docs Use Their Free Time

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The American Medical Association recently surveyed physicians to find what activities they pursue when not in the exam room.

More Information

CDC: Occupationally Acquired HIV Now Rare

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Documented occupational acquisition of HIV has now become rare in the United States, according to research published in the Dec. 9 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

More Information

Experts Discuss Pros and Cons of Maintenance of Certification

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The pros and cons of the American Board of Internal Medicine's (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) are discussed in two articles published in the Jan. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text - Irons and Nora
Full Text - Teirstein

Infections in ICU Up Five-Year Mortality for Elderly

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly people who develop infections while in an intensive care unit (ICU) are at increased risk of dying within five years after their hospital stay, according to a study published in the Jan. 1 issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

Abstract
Full Text

Article Highlights Top Technology Challenges for 2015

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The introduction of the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10), Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) audits, meaningful use 2, and the burdens of technology are the top four technological challenges for physicians in 2015, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

More Information

'July Effect' Has No Impact on Quality of Care in Stroke

TUESDAY, Jan. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers investigating the so-called "July effect" found that when recent medical school graduates begin their residency programs every summer in teaching hospitals, this transition doesn't reduce the quality of care for patients presenting with ischemic stroke.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Following AAP Guidelines Averts Kernicterus in Jaundiced Infants

TUESDAY, Jan. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Newborns with significant jaundice are not likely to develop kernicterus if American Academy of Pediatrics' treatment guidelines are followed, according to a new study published online Jan. 5 in JAMA Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text

Health Care-Linked Infections Up Costs in Cardiac Surgery

MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Health care-associated infections (HAIs) are strongly linked to hospital costs, length of stay, and readmission, according to research published in the Jan. 6 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Physician's Briefing

HealthDay

HealthDay is the world’s largest syndicator of health news and content, and providers of custom health/medical content.

Consumer Health News

A health news feed, reviewing the latest and most topical health stories.

Professional News

A news feed for Health Care Professionals (HCPs), reviewing latest medical research and approvals.