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January 2016 Briefing - Critical Care

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Critical Care for January 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

AMA Highlights Top Four Issues to Promote in State Legislation

THURSDAY, Jan. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The top four issues that will be promoted in state legislation in 2016 were discussed at the 2016 American Medical Association (AMA) State Legislative Strategy Conference, according to a report published by the AMA.

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n-3 PUFA Tx After AMI Linked to Drop in Death, Recurrent AMI

THURSDAY, Jan. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), the use of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is associated with reduced risk of all-cause mortality and recurrent AMI through 12-month follow-up, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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~1% of Physicians Account for One-Third of Malpractice Claims

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A small number of physicians account for a considerable proportion of all paid malpractice claims, according to a study published in the Jan. 28 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Too Few Nurses Compliant With Standard Precautions

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer than 20 percent of nurses report compliance with all nine Standard Precautions (SP), although adherence is the most effective means of preventing bloodborne pathogen transmission, according to a study published in the Jan. 1 issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

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Possibility for Health Care Legislation Changes in 2016

TUESDAY, Jan. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Given the current political climate and issues of bipartisan concern, 2016 could see certain changes to health care legislation, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Pulse Pressure Linked to Multiple Adverse Cardiovascular Outcomes

TUESDAY, Jan. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Pulse pressure (PP) is associated with multiple adverse cardiovascular outcomes, according to a study published in the Feb. 2 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Overweight, Obesity Linked to Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death

TUESDAY, Jan. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight and obese individuals are at increased risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) and non-SCD, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Better Value Care at Hospitals With Best Nursing Environments

MONDAY, Jan. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals with better nursing environments provide better value care, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in JAMA Surgery.

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IV Thrombolysis Aids Patients Dependent Before Their Stroke

FRIDAY, Jan. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) treatment might benefit stroke patients who needed help with daily living before their stroke, according to research published online Jan. 21 in Stroke.

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Families Prefer Hospice Over Hospital for Dying Relatives

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Earlier hospice enrollment, avoidance of intensive care unit (ICU) admissions within 30 days of death, and death occurring outside the hospital are associated with perceptions of better end-of-life care among family members of older patients who are dying of lung or colorectal cancer, according to research published in the Jan. 19 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on death, dying, and end of life.

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Physicians Choose Less Aggressive Care at End of Life

TUESDAY, Jan. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians facing death are less likely to demand aggressive care, according to two research letters published in the Jan. 19 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on death, dying, and end of life.

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Greater Transparency Being Promoted in Research

MONDAY, Jan. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Greater transparency is being promoted in clinical research, according to a health policy brief published online Jan. 14 in Health Affairs.

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Bioresorbable Silicon Electronic Sensor May Monitor Brain

MONDAY, Jan. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An novel implant utilizing a dissolvable sensor may be able to transmit information wirelessly to physicians during surgery or after a brain injury, according to an experimental study published online Jan. 18 in Nature.

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Nonverbal Cues May Reveal a Physician's Racial Bias

FRIDAY, Jan. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A physician's body language may reveal racial bias against seriously ill black patients, according to research published in the January issue of the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management.

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Compassion Fatigue May Be Underestimated by Trauma Teams

FRIDAY, Jan. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The challenges facing trauma care providers can put them at risk for compassion fatigue and burnout, according to a study published in the January/February issue of the Journal of Trauma Nursing.

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Diagnostic Imaging Down With High Deductible Health Plans

FRIDAY, Jan. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. patients whose health insurance plans have high deductibles undergo fewer diagnostic imaging tests, according to a study published in the February issue of Medical Care.

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WHO: West Africa Ebola Outbreak Is Over

THURSDAY, Jan. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The two-year Ebola outbreak in West Africa that claimed more than 11,300 lives is over, the World Health Organization said Thursday.

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Statins May Aid CABG Recovery

TUESDAY, Jan. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who take statins before and after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) have fewer complications and a reduced mortality risk during and soon after the operation, according to a new report published online Jan. 12 in the Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

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Azithromycin Prescribed Despite Risk for QTc Prolongation

TUESDAY, Jan. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Azithromycin is frequently prescribed to hospitalized patients despite the presence of risk factors for QTc prolongation, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Recommendations Developed for Antithrombotic Tx in VTE

TUESDAY, Jan. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- New recommendations have been developed for antithrombotic therapy for venous thromboembolism (VTE). The Antithrombotic Therapy for VTE Disease: CHEST Guideline was published online Jan. 7 in CHEST.

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Attending Physician Workload Linked to Teaching Effectiveness

MONDAY, Jan. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Attending physician workload is associated with lower teaching effectiveness, according to a study published online Jan. 6 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Lower Hospital Costs Tied to Palliative Care Consult

FRIDAY, Jan. 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Palliative care consultation within two days of hospitalization is associated with lower hospital costs for patients with incurable cancer, with greater savings for greater number of comorbidities, according to a study published in the January issue of Health Affairs.

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Telemedicine Beneficial for Nurses in Intensive Care

THURSDAY, Jan. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Intensive care telemedicine seems beneficial in nursing care, according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Critical Care.

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Trio of Papers Reveal Lessons Learned From Ebola Epidemic

THURSDAY, Jan. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A trio of papers published in the Jan. 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine reveal some of what has been learned about the Ebola virus.

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Unrestricted Visiting Hours Up Satisfaction of Patients' Families

TUESDAY, Jan. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A change from minimally restricted to unrestricted visitation hours is associated with improved satisfaction among patients' family members, according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Critical Care.

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Physician's Briefing

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