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October 2010 Briefing - Critical Care

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Critical Care for October 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Many Factors Found to Predict Hospital Readmission

FRIDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- In addition to having a chronic disease, many factors, including race, type of payer, depressive symptoms, and even body mass index (BMI), increase the risk of hospital readmission, according to research published online Oct. 12 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

Abstract - Allaudeen
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Abstract - Mudge
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Sepsis in Elderly Linked to Lost Cognition, Functionality

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly patients who are hospitalized for severe sepsis are at increased risk of substantial new cognitive impairment and diminished functionality, according to a study in the Oct. 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Primary Care Trails Other Specialties in Hourly Wages

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Primary care physicians have substantially lower hourly wages than other specialists, and although most physicians find Medicare reimbursement inequitable, they show little consensus on how to reform it, according to two studies published in the Oct. 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Leigh
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Abstract - Federman
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HealthGrades: Lower Mortality Seen at High-Ranked Hospitals

MONDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Patients at hospitals performing better than average on a variety of procedures and diagnoses have a lower risk of mortality compared to patients at low-performing hospitals, according to research released Oct. 20 by HealthGrades.

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Infections Exert Heavy Mortality Toll in Cirrhosis

FRIDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with cirrhosis, infections are associated with a steep increase in one-year mortality risk, according to research published in the October issue of Gastroenterology.

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New Guidelines for Recurrent Stroke Prevention Published

FRIDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A joint committee representing the American Heart Association and the American Stroke Association has published updated evidence-based recommendations on the prevention of ischemic stroke among survivors of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack; the statement has been published online Oct. 21 in Stroke.

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Infusion Ups Risk of Organ Failure in Trauma Patients

THURSDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Early transfusion of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) is associated with an increased risk of post-injury multiple organ failure (MOF), according to research published in the October issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
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Less Than Half of Encephalitis Due to Infectious Diseases

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Less than one-half of encephalitis cases in England were found to be attributable to infectious diseases, with the cause of encephalitis unclear in more than one-third of patients with a poor prognosis, according to a study published online Oct. 18 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Diabetes Hospitalizations Rise Among Young Adults

THURSDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalizations associated with diabetes have significantly increased among young adults, in particular young women, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in the Journal of Women's Health.

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Evidence Supports Early Spinal Stabilization Surgery

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with multiple trauma, early surgical stabilization of the spine is associated with a variety of improved outcomes, according to research published in the Oct. 1 issue of Spine.

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Prior Aspirin Use Is Marker for Recurrent MI Risk After ACS

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with a history of aspirin use who experience an incident of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) are at modestly higher risk of recurrent myocardial infarction (MI), but not mortality, compared with non-prior aspirin users, according to a study in the Oct. 19 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Transfusion Policies for Cardiac Surgery Vary in U.S.

TUESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Transfusion practices vary widely among institutions providing cardiac surgery, but a restrictive perioperative transfusion status does not appear to be inferior to a more liberal transfusion strategy in terms of 30-day morbidity and mortality, according to two studies published in the Oct. 13 issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract - Hajjar
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Abstract - Bennett-Guerrero
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Increasing Catheter Size Tied to Greater Thrombosis Risk

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Previous deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and increasing catheter size are related to an increased risk for peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC)-associated DVT, according to a study in the October issue of Chest.

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Hypertonic Saline Not Better for TBI Resuscitation

TUESDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Initial resuscitation with hypertonic saline with or without dextran is not superior to normal saline resuscitation in non-hypovolemic patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), according to research published in the Oct. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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