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Cutaneous Reactions Rarely Reported After COVID-19 Vaccine

1.9 percent of individuals reported cutaneous reaction after first dose of mRNA COVID-19 vaccine, most often rash and itching

red rash on man's back

THURSDAY, June 24, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Cutaneous reactions are rarely reported after receipt of an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine, according to a research letter published online June 23 in JAMA Dermatology.

Lacey B. Robinson, M.D., M.P.H., from Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, and colleagues conducted a prospective evaluation of Mass General Brigham employees who received an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine. Employees completed daily symptom surveys for three days after vaccination.

The researchers found that 83 percent of the 49,197 employees completed at least one symptom survey after the first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. Overall, 1.9 percent of respondents (776 respondents) reported cutaneous reactions after dose 1. The most common cutaneous reaction was rash and itching, which was reported by 559 respondents (1 percent). Those reporting cutaneous reactions had a mean age of 41 years, and reactions were more common in women than men (85 versus 15 percent) and differed by race (62, 7, and 12 percent among White, Black, and Asian individuals, respectively). Ninety-five percent of those with self-reported cutaneous reactions to the first dose received their second dose. Of the 609 individuals who completed a survey after their second dose, no recurrent cutaneous reaction was reported by 83 percent. Overall, 2.3 percent of individuals with no cutaneous reaction to the first dose reported a cutaneous reaction to the second dose, with rash and itching being the most common (1.6 percent).

"These data are reassuring for the millions of Americans who may develop cutaneous reactions after vaccination in the coming year," the authors write.

One author disclosed financial ties to the Abbott Medical Device Cybersecurity Council; a second author disclosed employment with CVS Health.

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