August 2006 Briefing - Dermatology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Dermatology for August 2006. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Bleomycin Tattooing Is Promising Scar Treatment

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 30 (HealthDay News) -- In the treatment of patients with large keloids and hypertrophic scars, bleomycin tattooing may produce better results than standard cryotherapy with intralesional triamcinolon injection, according to a study published in the August issue of Dermatologic Surgery.

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Botox Injections May Reduce Facial Scarring

FRIDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Botox may enhance facial wound healing and improve the appearance of scars, according to the results of a study published in the August issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Acral Melanoma Masquerades As Warts

FRIDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Dermoscopic examinations help make the correct diagnosis of acral melanomas that masquerade as atypical acral lesions, according to a study published in the August issue of Dermatologic Surgery.

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Large Numbers of Nevi May Increase Melanoma Risk

THURSDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Large numbers of nevi appear to increase the risk of developing cutaneous malignant melanoma, although the risk is not site-specific, except for the posterior trunk, according to a study in the September issue of the Journal of Investigative Dermatology.

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Routine Refrigeration and Reuse of Botox Is Safe

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Routine refrigerator storage and reuse of Botox for up to one to four months does not result in microbial contamination, according to a study in the August issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Parents Can Promote Sun-Safe Behaviors in Children

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Parents can play an important role in promoting sun-safe behaviors and reducing sunburn frequency and severity in their children when there is a good parent-child relationship and low levels of negative communication, according to a study in the August issue of Archives of Dermatology.

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Treatments Similarly Effective in Reducing Actinic Keratoses

TUESDAY, Aug. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Laser resurfacing, a trichloroacetic acid peel, or a fluorouracil cream are similarly effective in reducing the number of actinic keratoses (AKs) and the incidence of nonmelanoma skin cancer in patients with a history of these conditions, according to a study in the August issue of Archives of Dermatology.

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Lipid Levels Rise More Than Thought After Acne Treatment

MONDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- About 40 percent of patients taking isotretinoin to treat acne develop elevated triglycerides and about 30 percent develop high cholesterol, higher than previous estimates but transient and reversible in most cases, according to a study in the August issue of Archives of Dermatology.

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Hypnotherapy May Help Alopecia Areata Patients

MONDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Hypnotherapy may help relieve anxiety and depression as well as promote hair growth in patients with alopecia areata who are refractory to conventional treatments. However relapses do occur after treatment is stopped, according to a report in the August issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Skin Test May Identify Early Alzheimer's Disease

MONDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- A simple skin test can accurately detect the early stages of Alzheimer's disease or other forms of dementia and might be developed into a diagnostic tool, according to a report published online Aug. 18 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition.

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Weight Loss May Not Improve Cellulite Appearance

FRIDAY, Aug. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Most women who lose weight through medically supervised weight-loss programs also have improvements in cellulite severity and appearance, though cellulite can worsen in some women, according to a report in the August issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

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Practice, Academic Salaries Comparable for Dermatologists

THURSDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Despite common perception, median base incomes among dermatologists in academic and practice settings are actually comparable, according to a report in the August issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Bupivacaine Blocks Digital Nerve for Nearly 25 Hours

THURSDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Bupivacaine provides digital nerve blockade for approximately 25 hours, significantly longer than lidocaine alone or with epinephrine, according to a report in the August issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

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Most ED Patients with S. Aureus Infection Have MRSA

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, is the most common cause of skin and soft-tissue infections in patients presenting to emergency departments in 11 U.S. cities, according to a study conducted in August 2004 and reported in the Aug. 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Anakinra Effective for Inflammatory Disease

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The interleukin-1β blocker anakinra is safe and effective for patients with neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease, according to new research published in the Aug. 10 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Combination Therapy Works Best in Treating Keloids

MONDAY, Aug. 7 (HealthDay News) -- A combination of triamcinolone and 5-fluorouracil injections plus treatment with a pulsed-dye laser is more effective for treating keloids and hypertrophic scarring than injections alone, according to a report published in the July issue of Dermatologic Surgery.

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Developmental Factor Key to Melanoma Aggressiveness

THURSDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Melanoma cells may use the developmental growth factor, Nodal, to promote tumor growth and metastasis, according to a report published online July 30 in Nature Medicine.

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Gel May Help Prevent Scarring in Tattoo Removal by Laser

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 2 (HealthDay News) -- A heparin and onion extract-containing gel may help prevent scarring in patients undergoing laser tattoo removal, according to a study conducted in Hong Kong and published in the July issue of Dermatologic Surgery.

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Some Botulinum Toxin Shots More Painful Than Others

TUESDAY, Aug. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Some commercially available botulinum neurotoxin injections may be more painful than others, according to the results of a small study published in the July issue of Dermatologic Surgery.

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Laser Technique May Help Axillary Osmidrosis

TUESDAY, Aug. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Ablation of sweat glands using a pulsed neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet, 1064-nm laser system may help alleviate axillary osmidrosis, according to the results of a small study published in the July issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

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Physician's Briefing