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December 2009 Briefing - Dermatology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Dermatology for December 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Precautions and Training Can Reduce Scalpel Injuries

THURSDAY, Dec. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Although less common than needle-stick injuries, cuts from scalpels also put operating room personnel at risk and can be reduced by closely following safety precautions and taking advantage of new technology, according to a study in the December issue of the AORN Journal.

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Low-Level Laser Therapy for Body Sculpting Assessed

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Low-level laser therapy can reduce the circumference of certain areas of the body by reducing the adipose tissue layer, according to a study in the December issue of Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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Pruritic Symptoms Linked to Psychological Stress

FRIDAY, Dec. 25 (HealthDay News) -- In the general population, frequency of pruritic symptoms is strongly associated with psychological stress, according to a study in the December issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Injectable Fat Reduction Therapies in the Pipeline

FRIDAY, Dec. 25 (HealthDay News) -- There are a number of novel therapies that use injectable chemicals to reduce fat, but they are not an alternative to liposuction and none have been given regulatory approval anywhere in the world, according to a study in the December issue of Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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Environmental Factors Play Key Role in Skin Aging

THURSDAY, Dec. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Certain environmental factors are strongly associated with skin aging, according to a twin study in the December issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Ethnic, Racial Disparities Seen in Florida Melanoma Cases

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In Florida, the incidence of melanoma is rapidly increasing among white non-Hispanics and white Hispanics, and there is a significant racial disparity in the proportion of cases presenting with advanced disease, according to a study in the December issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Patients Often Lack Knowledge of Their Own Medications

THURSDAY, Dec. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Patients routinely under-report, or even over-report, their outpatient and inpatient medications, and should be included in hospital medication management to improve safety, according to a study published online Dec. 10 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Kalbitor Approved for Hereditary Angiodema

THURSDAY, Dec. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Kalbitor (ecallantide) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat dangerous flares of sudden fluid buildup in people with hereditary angiodema (HAE), the agency said.

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Women Researchers Lag Behind Men in Grant Awards

TUESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Female physicians with a proven interest in research are less likely to receive prestigious research grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) than are male physicians, according to a study in the Dec. 1 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Physician's Briefing
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