January 2008 Briefing - Dermatology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Dermatology for January 2008. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Topical Rapamycin May Hold Promise for Port-Wine Stains

THURSDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- When applied topically to laser-treated skin, the anti-angiogenic drug rapamycin inhibits regeneration of blood vessels, and this fact may prove useful in the treatment of port-wine stains, since regrowth of blood vessels following laser treatment can lead to lesion recurrence, according to an article published online Jan. 25 in Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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Lasers Promote Collagen Synthesis in Skin of Mice

THURSDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Laser irradiation of the skin promotes collagen synthesis and remodeling in a mouse model, according to an article published online Jan. 25 in Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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Laser Treatment Enhances Transdermal Drug Delivery

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Laser treatment of the skin using wavelengths in the visible light range can be used to ablate the outermost barrier of the skin, the stratum corneum, allowing improved transdermal delivery of the anticancer drug 5- Fluorouracil (5-Fu), without causing skin lesions, according to research published Jan. 25 in Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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Surgical Excision Margins for Melanomas Insufficient

THURSDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Surgical margins for the complete excision of a subtype of in-situ melanoma and its invasive counterpart are often inadequate, and tumors initially diagnosed as the in-situ type can be unexpectedly invasive, according to study findings published in the January issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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'Ugly Duckling' Sign for Malignant Melanoma Evaluated

TUESDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The ugly ducking sign -- the idea that a mole that looks different from an individual's other moles may be a melanoma -- appears to have a high sensitivity for the detection of malignant melanomas, according to an article published in the Archives of Dermatology in January.

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Better Cosmetic Results with New Lip Zone Classification

TUESDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A new classification of the lip area into 15 zones gives plastic surgeons improved control of lip shape and size when using non-animal-sourced stabilized hyaluronic acid or Restylane for lip augmentation, according to a study published in the January/February issue of the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery.

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Hormone Treatment Effective for Female Acne

MONDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Daily treatment with an oral ethinyl estradiol (EE)/drospirenone (DRSP) contraceptive plus spironolactone (SL) is effective and well-tolerated for treating moderate to severe hormonally influenced female acne, according to a study in the January issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Cost-Effectiveness of Biologic Psoriasis Agents Reviewed

MONDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Infliximab and adalimumab appear to be the most cost-effective biologic agents for the treatment of moderate to severe psoriasis, according to a review of studies published in the January issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Melanoma Initiating Cells Identified

THURSDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- A population of cells capable of initiating human melanomas has been identified, which could be targeted in cases of resistance to systemic therapy, researchers report in the Jan. 17 issue of Nature.

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Allopurinol Link to Rare Cutaneous Reactions Examined

THURSDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Allopurinol use is associated with an increased risk of two rare but life-threatening severe cutaneous adverse reactions and the risk increases with higher doses, according to the results of a study published in the January issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Etanercept Effective for Psoriasis in Children and Teens

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Etanercept, a soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor, was found to effectively treat moderate to severe plaque psoriasis in children and adolescents, according to research published in the Jan. 17 New England Journal of Medicine.

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Skin Cancer Risk Behaviors Common Among U.S. Adults

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Behaviors that raise the risk of skin cancer are widespread in America, with most individuals engaging in multiple risky behaviors, including infrequent use of sunscreen and protective clothing, according to research published in the February issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Increased Sun Exposure May Improve Cancer Prognoses

MONDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Moderately increased sun exposure and optimal vitamin D status may help improve cancer prognoses and also may have more favorable than unfavorable effects on other health outcomes, according to a report published in the Jan. 15 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Socioeconomic Status Linked to Melanoma Outcomes

THURSDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Melanoma patients with low socioeconomic status are more likely to have a poorer outcome, although blacks still have poorer survival than whites regardless of treatment or socioeconomic status, according to study findings published in the Jan. 1 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Infrared Measurement May Optimize Laser Hair Removal

FRIDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- In assessing patients scheduled to undergo laser hair removal, a method involving infrared measurement of human skin temperature can accurately predict individual maximum safe radiant exposure, according to a report published in the December issue of Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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Liquid Carbon Dioxide Is an Enviro-Friendly Cryogen Spray

TUESDAY, Jan. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Cryogen spray cooling with liquid carbon dioxide during dermatologic laser surgery may be significantly more environmentally friendly than standard cryogen spray cooling with tetrafluoroethane, researchers report in the December issue of Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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