Papulopustular Rosacea Rate, UV Exposure Not Related

Prevalence in Ireland is 2.7 percent, but photodamage does not appear to play a role

FRIDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of papulopustular rosacea (PPR) in Ireland is nearly 3 percent, though cumulative ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure does not affect the prevalence of the condition among the country's predominantly fair-skinned population, according to research published in the July issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Maeve A. McAleer, of the Mater Misericordiae University Hospital in Dublin, Ireland, and colleagues investigated the prevalence of PPR in Ireland and its relationship to prior UV radiation exposure. The study included 500 subjects who were predicted to have low UV cumulative exposure and 500 subjects who were predicted to have high cumulative UV exposure. PPR was diagnosed if subjects met a standardized definition; photodamage was assessed using a photodamage scale.

In the study population, the investigators found that the prevalence of PPR was 2.7 percent, with no significant difference between the low- and high-UV-exposure subgroups. Photodamage was also not associated with the prevalence of PPR in this population. The researchers note that a limitation of this study was the inability to compare actual UV exposure among individuals with and without PPR.

"On the basis of our findings, investigations into the cause of PPR should be directed toward factors other than UV radiation, such as the skin type and the volume and quality of sebaceous gland secretions and pilosebaceous unit abnormalities in individuals with PPR; the presence of microorganisms such as Demodex mites or bacteria; or facial vascular reactivity and vasoactive mediators," the authors write.

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Lindsey Marcellin

Lindsey Marcellin

Published on June 25, 2010

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