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Impaired Fasting Glucose Predicts Risk in Women Only

Risk of coronary heart disease or cardiovascular disease doubled

TUESDAY, Jan. 15 (HealthDay News) -- An impaired fasting glucose of 100-125 mg/dL approximately doubles the risk of developing coronary heart disease or cardiovascular disease in women only, according to study findings published in the Jan. 22 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Yamini S. Levitzky, M.D., from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Framingham Heart Study in Massachusetts, and colleagues examined whether impaired fasting glucose predicted incident coronary heart disease (in 4,138 individuals) or cardiovascular disease (in 4,058 individuals). They tested the American Diabetes Association definitions of impaired fasting glucose from 1997 (110-125 mg/dL) and 2003 (100-125 mg/dL).

The researchers found that there were 291 coronary heart disease events and 423 cardiovascular disease events. In women, both definitions were associated with a significantly higher risk of coronary heart disease (odds ratios, 2.2 for 1997 and 1.7 for 2003). The odds ratio for women with diabetes was 2.5. In women, only the 1997 definition was associated with a significantly higher risk of cardiovascular disease (OR, 2.1). There was no higher risk for either coronary heart disease or cardiovascular disease in men by either definition.

"In women, both impaired fasting glucose definitions were associated with increased coronary heart disease risk, whereas neither impaired fasting glucose definition identified men at increased short-term risk for coronary heart disease or cardiovascular disease," Levitzky and colleagues conclude.

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