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Lanreotide Improves Survival With Enteropancreatic Tumors

Findings based on aqueous-gel form of lanreotide treatment versus placebo

Lanreotide Improves Survival With Enteropancreatic Tumors

MONDAY, July 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Lanreotide significantly improves survival among patients with metastatic enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (grade 1 or 2), according to a study published in the July 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Martyn E. Caplin, D.M., from Royal Free Hospital in London, and colleagues conducted a multinational study of patients with advanced, well-differentiated or moderately-differentiated, nonfunctioning, somatostatin receptor-positive neuroendocrine tumors (grade 1 or 2 that originated in the pancreas, midgut, or hindgut, or were of unknown origin) and documented disease-progression status. Participants were randomly assigned to receive an extended-release aqueous-gel formulation of lanreotide at a dose of 120 mg (101 patients) or placebo (103 patients) once every 28 days for 96 weeks.

The researchers found that, compared to placebo, lanreotide was associated with significantly prolonged progression-free survival (P < 0.001; hazard ratio for progression or death, 0.47). At 24 months, the estimated rates of progression-free survival were 65.1 percent in the lanreotide group and 33.0 percent in the placebo group. In predefined subgroups, the therapeutic effect was generally consistent with that found in the overall population. Groups were similar in quality of life and overall survival. Diarrhea was the most common treatment-related adverse event (26 percent of the lanreotide group versus 9 percent of the placebo group).

"Lanreotide was associated with significantly prolonged progression-free survival among patients with metastatic enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors of grade 1 or 2 (Ki67 < 10 percent)," the authors write.

The study was funded by Ipsen, the manufacturer of lanreotide.

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