Menopause Not Tied to Diabetes Risk for Glucose Intolerant

Bilateral oophorectomy linked to decreased risk of diabetes in women allocated to lifestyle intervention

MONDAY, Aug. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Natural menopause is not associated with diabetes risk and does not influence response to diabetes prevention programs in women with glucose intolerance, according to a study published in the August issue of Menopause.

Catherine Kim, M.D., M.P.H., from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, investigated the association between diabetes risk and menopause status in women with glucose intolerance, and whether menopause status affects the response to diabetes prevention intervention. Data were collected for 708 women in premenopause, 328 women in natural postmenopause, and 201 women with bilateral oophorectomy, who participated in the Diabetes Prevention Program with placebo-controlled trial of lifestyle intervention and metformin. Associations between menopause and diabetes risk were assessed after adjustments for demographic variables, waist circumference, insulin resistance, and corrected insulin response. Similar models were constructed after stratification by type of menopause and hormone therapy.

The investigators found that, after adjustment for age, there was no correlation between diabetes risk and natural menopause or bilateral oophorectomy. There were differences in the response to lifestyle intervention or metformin treatment in women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy. The adjusted hazard risk (HR) for diabetes in women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy was significantly lower in the lifestyle group (HR, 0.19), but there were no significant differences in either the placebo or metformin groups.

"Among women at high risk for diabetes, natural menopause was not associated with diabetes risk and did not affect response to diabetes prevention interventions. In the lifestyle intervention, bilateral oophorectomy was associated with a decreased diabetes risk," the authors write.

Funding for the study was provided by the pharmaceutical, biomedical device, nutrition, and other commercial industries.

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