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All-Cause, CVD, DM Mortality Down From 2000 to 2011

Decreases seen in type 1 and 2 diabetes; no change in age-standardized cancer-specific mortality

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TUESDAY, May 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- All-cause and certain cause-specific mortality rates have decreased recently among those with type 1 and 2 diabetes, although younger patients have seen less improvement, according to a study published online April 26 in Diabetes Care.

Jessica L. Harding, from the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute in Melbourne, Australia, and colleagues used data for 1,189,079 Australians with diabetes registered on the National Diabetes Service Scheme between 2000 and 2011. These data were linked to the National Death Index. The authors age standardized mortality rates in the total population to the 2001 Australian population.

The researchers found that between 2000 and 2011, all-cause, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and diabetes age-standardized mortality rates (ASMRs) decreased each year by 0.61, 0.35, and 0.14 per 1,000 person-years, respectively, for type 1 diabetes (Ptrend < 0.05); there was no change in cancer mortality. All age groups had significant decreases in all-cause, CVD, and diabetes mortality rates, except for diabetes mortality in those aged 0 to 40 years. For type 2 diabetes, the corresponding decreases in all-cause, CVD, and diabetes ASMRs were 0.18, 0.15, and 0.03 per 1,000 person-years, respectively (Ptrend < 0.001), with no change in cancer mortality. These decreases were seen in all age groups apart from those aged 0 to 40 years, where significant increases in all-cause and cancer mortality were observed.

"Younger populations are not benefiting from the same improvements as older populations," the authors write. "The absence of a decline in cancer mortality warrants urgent attention."

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