August 2006 Briefing - Diabetes & Endocrinology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Diabetes & Endocrinology for August 2006. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

New Diagnostic Model Predicts Coronary Artery Disease

THURSDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- In heart failure patients with left ventricular dysfunction, a new diagnostic model may provide an accurate baseline assessment of coronary artery disease and reduce the need for invasive tests, according to a study published in the August issue of the American Heart Journal.

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Chromium Picolinate Reduces Diabetic Weight Increase

THURSDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Type 2 diabetics who take sulfonylurea agents and chromium picolinate supplements gain significantly less weight, body fat and abdominal mass than those taking a placebo, researchers report in the August issue of Diabetes Care.

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Diabetic Foot Disease Outcome Measures Compared

THURSDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with diabetic foot disease, ulcer-related outcome measures may underestimate true morbidity and mortality. To improve disease management, greater emphasis should be placed on patient-related outcome measures, according to a study published in the August issue of Diabetes Care.

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Polycystic Ovarian Changes Common in Type 2 Diabetes

THURSDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- In premenopausal women with type 2 diabetes, polycystic ovary is common but polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is not, according to a paper in the August issue of Fertility and Sterility.

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Cognitive Dysfunction Tied to Poor Diabetes Control in Elderly

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Older diabetic patients have an increased risk of developing undiagnosed cognitive dysfunction, depression and various functional disabilities that are associated with poor diabetes control, according to a report in the August issue of Diabetes Care.

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Night-Eating Syndrome Complicates Diabetes Care

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 30 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with diabetes, night-eating syndrome may lead to adverse outcomes, according to a report published in the August issue of Diabetes Care.

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Type 2 Diabetics Benefit from Low-Fat Vegan Diet

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Although patients with type 2 diabetes benefit from either a low-fat vegan diet or the American Diabetes Association (ADA) diet, those who adopt a vegan diet may expect to see significantly better outcomes, according to a study published in the August issue of Diabetes Care.

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High-Calcium Mineral Waters Effective Way to Boost Intake

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Bottled mineral waters enriched with added calcium may be a useful means to boost intake of the mineral, according to a study published in the August issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Doctors' Judgment Validated in Treating Heart Disease

TUESDAY, Aug. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors really do know best when it comes to prescribing the most beneficial treatments for patients with coronary artery disease, according to research published online Aug. 29 by the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Pre-Meal Insulin Glulisine Beneficial for Type 1 Diabetics

TUESDAY, Aug. 29 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with type 1 diabetes, a new rapid-acting insulin analog -- insulin glulisine -- may provide better blood glucose control than regular human insulin when administered immediately before a meal, according to a study published in the August issue of Diabetes Care.

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Nephropathy Less Likely With Isosmolar Contrast Media

TUESDAY, Aug. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Isosmolar contrast media iodixanol is associated with a significantly lower risk of contrast-induced nephropathy than low-osmolar contrast media, according to a study published in the Aug. 15 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Chemical Chaperones Correct Type 2 Diabetes in Mice

MONDAY, Aug. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Drugs that help proteins fold correctly, called chemical chaperones, can correct insulin resistance in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes and may be able to do the same in humans, according to a report in the Aug. 25 issue of Science.

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Blood Sugar Levels Higher in Diabetic Blacks Than in Whites

FRIDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Black diabetic patients have higher levels of glycosylated hemoglobin than whites, researchers report in a study published online Aug. 25 in Diabetes Care. High glycosylated hemoglobin, or A1C, levels are associated with poor glucose control and diabetes-related complications from retinopathy to lower-extremity amputation.

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Inflammatory Markers Linked to Metabolic Syndrome

THURSDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- In patients newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, markers of inflammation and fibrinolysis associated with cardiovascular morbidity are strongly associated with the number of components of metabolic syndrome, according to a study published in the August issue of Diabetes.

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Mortality Linked to BMI in Two National Cohort Studies

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Two trials, one involving more than 500,000 Americans and the other over one million Koreans, suggest that even modest amounts of excess weight in middle age is associated with a higher risk of mortality. Results of both studies are published in the Aug. 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Gene Variant Increases Retinopathy Risk in Diabetics

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance have nearly twice the risk of developing retinopathy if they carry a variant of the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) gene, according to a study in the August issue of Diabetes.

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Ethnic Differences Observed in Stroke Recurrence

TUESDAY, Aug. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Mexican-Americans who experience a first ischemic stroke have a higher risk of stroke recurrence than their non-Hispanic white counterparts, according to a study published online Aug. 22 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Insulin Resistance at 13 May Predict Future Heart Risk

TUESDAY, Aug. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Reducing insulin resistance in teens, along with their weight, may be necessary to decrease their risk of cardiovascular disease, according to the results of a study published online Aug. 21 in Hypertension.

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Immune Markers Predict Success of Diabetes Prevention

TUESDAY, Aug. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with impaired glucose tolerance are more likely to progress to type 2 diabetes if they have elevated levels of C-reactive protein and other inflammatory and immunological markers, according to a study in the August issue of Diabetes.

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BMI Does Not Accurately Forecast Heart Disease Death

FRIDAY, Aug. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Body mass index does not dependably forecast heart disease mortality, most likely because it cannot differentiate between muscle mass and fat, researchers report in the Aug. 19 issue of The Lancet.

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Socioeconomic Status Linked to Late-Life Disability

THURSDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- While the link between extreme poverty and poor health has long been recognized, a new report in the Aug. 17 New England Journal of Medicine extends the socioeconomic disparity to functional limitation and disability later in life.

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Leptin May Inhibit Uterine Contractility

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 16 (HealthDay News) -- High leptin levels in overweight and obese pregnant women may inhibit uterine contractility and help explain why such women are more likely to have unsuccessful vaginal deliveries and a high rate of Caesarean sections, according to the results of an in vitro study published in the August issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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An 18-Hole Round of Golf Equals 10,000 Steps

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Playing an 18-hole round of golf may help people meet the recommendation that they accumulate 10,000 steps each day as part of a general physical activity plan, according to a study published in the August issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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No Cardiovascular Risk Seen in Younger Pot Smokers

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 16 (HealthDay News) -- In young adults, marijuana use is not independently associated with increased body mass index and other cardiovascular risk factors. But it is strongly associated with other unhealthy behaviors, according to a study published in the Aug. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Doctors' Views on Disclosure of Errors Varies Widely

TUESDAY, Aug. 15 (HealthDay News) -- There is a wide variation across the medical profession when it comes to disclosing medical errors to patients, with the visibility of the error and medical specialty both playing a role, according to two studies in the August 14/28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Cup of Coffee Associated with Myocardial Infarction Risk

TUESDAY, Aug. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of having a myocardial infarction within one hour of consuming coffee is greater in patients with coronary heart disease risk factors, a sedentary lifestyle or who consume one cup of coffee or less per day compared to other patients, according to a report published online Aug. 15 in Epidemiology.

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AHA Issues Statement on Physical Activity in Schools

MONDAY, Aug. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Schools must take the lead in promoting adequate physical activity for children during the school day, according to a scientific statement published online Aug. 14 in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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CPR Knowledge is Lacking in Seriously Ill Patients

THURSDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Seriously ill hospitalized patients lack information about cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and more than one-third of them do not wish to discuss end-of-life preferences with their physician, according to study results published in the August issue of Chest.

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Gut Microbes Contribute to Insulin Resistance

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Symbiotic microbes found in the gut can disrupt choline metabolism and contribute to the development of insulin resistance, highlighting the "thin line between gut commensal and pathogen," according to a report published online Aug. 8 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Ghrelin Vaccines Reduce Weight Gain in Rats

MONDAY, Aug. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have developed a vaccine that can slow weight gain in rats by targeting ghrelin and decreasing feeding efficiency, according to a report published online Aug. 4 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition.

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Radioisotope-Treated Patients May Trigger Security Alarms

FRIDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Patients treated with radioisotopes may inadvertently trigger security alarms at airports, banks and other public buildings, a problem that many patients and even professionals in the field are unaware of, according to a study published in the Aug. 5 issue of BMJ.

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Mutations in ABCC8 Gene Linked to Neonatal Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Heterozygous activating mutations in the ABCC8 gene may cause both permanent and transient neonatal diabetes, according to a study in the Aug. 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. Mutations in ABCC8 affect the sulfonylurea receptor (SUR1) regulatory subunit of the potassium channels in beta cells, and some patients may be able to switch from insulin to oral sulfonylureas.

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Switch to Sulfonylurea Benefits Some Diabetics

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 2 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with diabetes caused by KCNJ11 mutations, short-term sulfonylurea therapy is safe and probably more effective than insulin therapy, according to a study published in the Aug. 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Dead Donors Are a Source of Transplantable Kidneys

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 2 (HealthDay News) -- The graft survival rates of transplanted kidneys from donors who died due to an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest are as good as those from heart-beating kidney donors who are younger than age 60, according to a study published in the Aug. 1 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Racial Disparities Seen in U.S. Medical Insurance Coverage

TUESDAY, Aug. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Among working-age adults in the United States, Hispanics and blacks are more likely than whites to have gaps in their insurance coverage, not receive necessary care and face medical debt, according to a report published Aug. 1 by The Commonwealth Fund.

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Tool Estimates Portion Size of Wedge-Shaped Foods

TUESDAY, Aug. 1 (HealthDay News) -- An adjustable wedge is more accurate than a ruler in estimating the portion size of wedge-shaped foods such as cake and pizza in about one-third of cases, although substantial misestimation still occurs, according to a report in the August issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

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Physician's Briefing