Dec. 2005 Briefing - Diabetes & Endocrinology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in diabetes and endocrinology for December 2005. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Aggressive Approach Identifies Heart Disease in Diabetics

FRIDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- An aggressive diagnostic approach including angiography can identify subclinical coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with type 2 diabetes, according to a study in the January issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Metabolic Syndrome Accelerates Aortic Stiffness

FRIDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Aortic stiffness progresses more quickly in patients with metabolic syndrome, according to a longitudinal study in the January issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Nearly 60% of Older Americans Have Hearing Loss

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Hearing loss is present in nearly 60% of elderly Americans, and it is more common in whites than blacks, according to a study published in the December issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Coma Outcomes on Soap Operas Too Good to Be True

TUESDAY, Dec. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Coma patients in soap operas experience significantly rosier outcomes than their real-life counterparts, according to a study published in the Dec. 24 issue of the British Medical Journal.

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Thromboembolism Syndrome After Surgery on the Rise

TUESDAY, Dec. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Surgical patients are becoming more vulnerable to perioperative acute thromboembolism syndrome because of the increasing incidence of comorbid conditions, including cardiac and cerebrovascular diseases, metabolic diseases and cancer, according to a study published in the December issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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New U.K. Guidelines for Heart Disease, Stroke Prevention

TUESDAY, Dec. 27 (HealthDay News) -- British researchers issued new criteria for the prevention of heart disease and stroke that are likely to increase the number of people targeted for screening and treatment. The guidelines are published in a supplement to the December issue of Heart.

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Moderate Alcohol Intake Cuts Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

TUESDAY, Dec. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Moderate alcohol consumption may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes among older women, according to a study in the December issue of Diabetes Care.

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Sorry, Celebrants: Hangover Cures Don't Work

MONDAY, Dec. 26 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that there is no conventional or complementary intervention that will prevent or treat a hangover, according to a study published in the Dec. 24 issue of the British Medical Journal.

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Ghrelin Increases Gastric Emptying in Diabetics

MONDAY, Dec. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Ghrelin enhances gastric emptying in diabetics with gastroparesis, a condition with no consistently effective treatment, according to a study in the December issue of Gut.

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Short Drinks May Have More Kick Than Tall Ones

MONDAY, Dec. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Because of human perceptual bias, alcoholic beverages mixed in short, wide tumblers may be more potent than those mixed in taller and more slender highball glasses, according to a study published in the Dec. 24 issue of the British Medical Journal.

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Cytokine May Play Key Role in Triggering Type 1 Diabetes

FRIDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Type 1 diabetes may be kick-started by cytokine-induced necrosis of beta-cells in the pancreas, according to a study published online Dec. 20 in the open access journal Public Library of Science Medicine.

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Increased Risk of Hip Fracture in Type 1 Diabetic Patients

FRIDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Both men and women with type 1 diabetes have a substantially increased risk of hip fracture, Swedish researchers report in the December issue of Diabetes Care.

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Black Diabetics Have Higher Glycosylated Hemoglobin

THURSDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Black diabetics have higher levels of glycosylated hemoglobin than white diabetics, but this does not appear to be due to quality of care, according to a study published in the December issue of Diabetes Care.

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Intensive Therapy Cuts Complication Risk for Diabetics

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Intensive therapy aimed at glycemic control reduces the risk of vascular and neurologic complications in type 1 diabetes, according to a study in the Dec. 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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New Risk Factor for Atherosclerosis Identified

TUESDAY, Dec. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Endothelial lipase (EL), a molecule previously associated with atherosclerosis in mice, may also be a risk factor for atherosclerosis in humans, according to a study published online Dec. 19 in the open access Public Library of Science Medicine.

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Hospital 'Handoffs' Common Source of Medical Errors

TUESDAY, Dec. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Poor communication during hospital "handoffs," when patient care transitions from one physician or team of physicians to the next, may be responsible for many of the estimated 44,000 to 98,000 deaths that occur each year in U.S. hospitals due to medical errors, according to a study published in the December issue of Academic Medicine.

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S. Korean Researcher Requests Cloning Paper Retraction

MONDAY, Dec. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Following a worldwide flurry of fraud and ethics charges, the editors of Science announced Friday that South Korean scientist Dr. Hwang Woo-Suk has requested that his cloning study published online by the journal in May be withdrawn because of errors. However, Hwang still maintains that, despite the errors, the findings are sound.

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Bariatric Surgeries Jump 450% in U.S. in Five Years

MONDAY, Dec. 19 (HealthDay News) -- A 450% increase in bariatric surgeries in the United States between 1998 and 2002 could be tied to the growth of laparoscopic bariatric surgery, according to a study in the December issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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More Hospitals Offer Palliative Care Programs

FRIDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Palliative care programs are a rapidly growing trend in U.S. hospitals, and widely regarded as an improvement in the care of advanced, chronic illness, according to a study published Dec. 12 in the Journal of Palliative Medicine.

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FDA Issues Recall on Meridian Hemodialysis Unit

THURSDAY, Dec. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a Class I Recall Wednesday for the Meridian Hemodialysis Instrument (product codes 5M5576 and 5M5576R), a classification that does not require that the instrument be returned. One death and at least one serious injury has been connected with the kinking of blood tubing when it is routed through both channels of the clips mounted on the front of the machine, according to the federal agency.

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Disease-Related Internet Use Expected to Increase

THURSDAY, Dec. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Chronically ill adult patients are frequent users of the Internet to get information about their condition and seek mutual support, and they say they expect to increase their use in the future to contact their care providers, according to a study in the January issue of the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.

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High Insulin Levels Increase Risk of Pancreatic Cancer

TUESDAY, Dec. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Men with higher insulin concentrations and insulin resistance may have a twofold increased risk of pancreatic cancer, according to a study published in the Dec. 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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U.S. Hospitals Lag in Adopting Safety Recommendations

TUESDAY, Dec. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Despite some improvements in hospital patient safety systems, many hospitals have made slow progress in adopting 1998 recommendations from the Institute of Medicine National Roundtable on Health Care Quality or from subsequent reports, according to a study published in the Dec. 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Antihypertensive Drugs Offer Limited Renoprotection

MONDAY, Dec. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Beyond lowering blood pressure, antihypertensive drugs may have no additional renoprotective effects in either diabetic or non-diabetic patients with renal disease, according to a study in the Dec. 10 issue of The Lancet.

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Personal Fulfillment Motivates Adolescents to Get Fit

THURSDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Personal fulfillment, including such factors as enjoyment of physical activity and a desire to become fit, is what motivates most adolescents to become physically active, according to a study published in the December issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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FDA Warns Eyedrops Contaminated with Bacteria

THURSDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned consumers this week not to use Miracle II Neutralizer and Miracle II Neutralizer Gel products because they are bacterially contaminated and could cause severe infections.

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Small Study Suggests Leptin Could Maintain Weight Loss

THURSDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Low-dose leptin could reverse the skeletal muscle, autonomic and neuroendocrine changes that occur after weight loss, which may help prevent dieters from regaining weight, according to a study published in the December issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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New Guidelines Issued on Peripheral Arterial Disease

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Concerned about the increasing incidence of peripheral arterial disease in the United States, the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association issued new guidelines this week for the early detection of the artery-clogging disease.

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Body Weight Rises with Poor Nutrition Policies in School

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The body mass index of children increases 10% with each additional food-related policy permitted by schools, with the most common being the use of food as incentive in the classroom and in fundraising, according to a Minnesota study published in the December issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine. The researchers call for a higher level of nutritional integrity in schools.

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Diabetic Foot Wounds Respond to Two New Treatments

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Negative pressure wound therapy and once-a-day intravenous antibiotic therapy with ertapenem both show promise as new approaches in the healing of diabetic foot wounds. Two studies describing these approaches were published in the Nov. 12 issue of The Lancet.

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Hospitalization for Pneumonia on the Rise Among Elderly

TUESDAY, Dec. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalizations for pneumonia increased by 20% between 1988 and 2002 in patients aged 64 to 85, and an increasing prevalence of comorbid conditions such as heart disease and diabetes may be the reason why, according to a report in the Dec. 7 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. One in 20 patients over age 85 is hospitalized for pneumonia every year.

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Ultrafiltration Effective for Patients with Heart Failure

FRIDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Two new studies suggest that in patients with heart failure, ultrafiltration can induce fluid removal and weight loss in an effective and well-tolerated manner, as well as reduce length of hospital stay and readmission. The studies were published in the Dec. 6 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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CDC Says Most Americans Still Too Sedentary

FRIDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Despite government efforts, more than half of U.S. adults remain at an insufficient level of physical activity to benefit their health, according to the Dec. 2 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. More public health efforts at all levels are needed to get Americans exercising regularly, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American College of Sports Medicine.

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Depression Affects Drug Adherence for Comorbidities

FRIDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Two new studies suggest that depression plays an important role in whether or not patients adhere to medication regimens for other conditions. In one study, taking depression medication was associated with adherence to diabetes and coronary artery disease (CAD) medication, while in the other non-adherence to medication for coronary heart disease (CHD) was associated with major depression. Both studies were published in the Nov. 28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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