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June 2006 Briefing - Diabetes & Endocrinology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Diabetes & Endocrinology for June 2006. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Netrins May Spur Blood Vessels in Ischemia, Diabetes

FRIDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have found that the developmental signaling molecules called netrins, previously shown to direct neuron migration, also help form new blood vessels, according to a report published June 29 in Sciencexpress, the early edition of Science. The molecules boosted capillary growth in animal models of ischemia and diabetes.

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Too Much Iodine Can Increase Autoimmune Thyroiditis

WEDNESDAY, June 28 (HealthDay News) -- Too much iodine consumption has been linked to an increase in hypothyroidism and autoimmune thyroiditis cases in China, according to a study in the June 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Reducing Homocysteine Does Not Improve Cognition

WEDNESDAY, June 28 (HealthDay News) -- In healthy older people, B-vitamin therapy to reduce blood levels of homocysteine does not appear to improve cognitive function, according to a study in the June 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Coffee May Cut Diabetes Risk in Postmenopausal Women

MONDAY, June 26 (HealthDay News) -- In postmenopausal women, drinking coffee -- especially the decaffeinated brew -- is inversely associated with the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a study in the June 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Cheap Pedometers Tend to Inaccurately Record Steps

THURSDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- Pedometers have become widely available, but many cheaper models are not useful for health purposes because they do not accurately monitor the steps taken, according to a study published online June 21 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

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Type 1 Diabetics Over 50 Have Little Cognitive Impairment

MONDAY, June 19 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic hyperglycemia associated with type 1 diabetes does not seem to have a dramatic impact on cognition and brain abnormalities in older patients as has been shown in younger patients, according to a report in the June issue of Diabetes.

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Type 2 Diabetes Incidence Doubles in the Middle-Aged

MONDAY, June 19 (HealthDay News) -- New cases of type 2 diabetes in middle-aged Americans have doubled in the past 30 years, with most of the increase attributable to a rise in those with a high body mass index, according to a study in the June 19 issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Macrophages in Fat Linked to Liver Damage in Obesity

MONDAY, June 19 (HealthDay News) -- The accumulation of macrophages in the omental white adipose tissue of morbidly obese patients is associated with severe hepatic inflammatory damage, according to a report in the June issue of Diabetes.

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Pregnancy Outcomes Worse in Diabetic Than Other Women

FRIDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- Infants born to women with type 1 or type 2 diabetes have perinatal mortality rates and major congenital anomaly rates about four times and more than two times higher, respectively, than infants in the general population, according to a study published online June 16 in BMJ.

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Statin Dose Cuts Cardiac Events 25 Percent in Diabetics

THURSDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- High doses of the lipid-lowering drug atorvastatin cut major cardiovascular events in diabetics with stable coronary heart disease by one-quarter, according to a report in the June issue of Diabetes Care.

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Metformin Protects Mice from Alcohol Liver Damage

THURSDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Metformin dramatically reduces alcohol-induced liver damage in mice after both acute and chronic exposure, according to a report in the June issue of Gastroenterology.

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Serum Protein Associated with Insulin Resistance

WEDNESDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- Increased serum levels of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4), which is secreted by adipocytes, is associated with insulin resistance in patients with type 2 diabetes or who are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a study in the June 15 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Diabetes Complication Risk in Children Varies with Type

WEDNESDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- Children with diabetes are more likely to develop retinopathy if they have the type 1 form of the disease, and are at greater risk of hypertension and microalbuminuria if they have type 2, according to a report in the June issue of Diabetes Care.

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Glucose Metabolism Impaired in Chronic Neuropathies

MONDAY, June 12 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of patients with chronic neuropathic pain of unknown cause have impairments in glucose metabolism, with the two-hour oral glucose tolerance test (2h-OGTT) a better indicator than fasting plasma glucose levels, according to a study published online June 12 in the Archives of Neurology.

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Estradiol Protects Mice from Developing Diabetes

THURSDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- Both male and female mice that lack estradiol or estrogen receptors are prone to developing diabetes, possibly explaining the lower prevalence of diabetes in females, according to a study published online June 5 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition.

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Chronic Infection May Raise Risk of Insulin Resistance

WEDNESDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to pathogens associated with inflammation and atherosclerosis including herpes simplex virus (HSV) and Chlamydia pneumoniae may also be associated with a greater risk of developing insulin resistance, according to a study in the May issue of Diabetes Care.

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Long-Term Compliance Good After Myocardial Infarction

WEDNESDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- When patients are started on beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and statins soon after an acute myocardial infarction, they are likely to continue taking the medications for many years. But the dosages they receive may be suboptimal, according to a study published in the May issue of the European Heart Journal.

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Obese Adults Eat More Fat, Less Fiber Than Peers

WEDNESDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Calorie for calorie, overweight or obese patients consume fewer complex carbohydrates and less fiber than their lean counterparts, according to a report in the June issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association. Overall, patients with a lower body mass index (BMI) consumed 43 percent more complex carbohydrates and 33 percent more fiber per each 1,000 calories consumed than high-BMI patients.

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Online Course Launched to Focus on Gender, Health Issues

WEDNESDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration Office of Women's Health and the National Institutes of Health Office of Research on Women's Health have launched a new online course that is aimed at clinicians and highlights how illness and health outcomes differ between males and females.

More Information -- FDA
The Science of Sex and Gender in Human Health

Exercise Helps Control Glycemia in Diabetic Children

TUESDAY, June 6 (HealthDay News) -- Regular physical activity helps control glycemia in pediatric patients with type I diabetes mellitus without increasing the risk of severe hypoglycemia, according to a study in the June issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Adult Autoimmune Diabetes Screening Tool Developed

TUESDAY, June 6 (HealthDay News) -- Adults with at least two of five distinguishing features of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) should be monitored for circulating islet antibodies, according to a new diagnostic tool reported in the May issue of Diabetes Care.

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Chronic Kidney Disease Linked to Cardiovascular Disease

FRIDAY, June 2 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic kidney disease is strongly associated with risk for myocardial infarction and cardiovascular disease-related mortality, according to the May issue of the European Heart Journal.

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Insulin Alarms Transiently Improve Control in Children

FRIDAY, June 2 (HealthDay News) -- Meal bolus alarms designed to remind type 1 diabetics to take their insulin after eating have only a modest effect on glycemic control, according to a study of younger patients in the May issue of Diabetes Care.

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New Tool Predicts 10-Year Heart Risk in Type 2 Diabetics

THURSDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- A pen-and-paper estimator of 10-year coronary heart disease (CHD) risk for type 2 diabetics accurately predicts CHD in four out of five cases, researchers report in the May issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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