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September 2008 Briefing - Diabetes & Endocrinology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Diabetes & Endocrinology for September 2008. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

News Media Under-Report Drug Company Funding of Research

TUESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Reports on medication research published in general news media often fail to disclose that the research received pharmaceutical company funding and frequently refer to drugs by brand name rather than using the generic name, according to an article published in the Oct. 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Excess Prenatal Testosterone Negatively Impacts Males

TUESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Excess testosterone exposure during pregnancy reduces the reproductive health of male offspring in sheep, according to a report first released online July 31, in advance of publication in an upcoming issue of Endocrinology.

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Gastric Bypass May Be Associated with Bone Loss

MONDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Patients undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass may be at risk of subsequent bone loss, according to research published in the October issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Joint Commission Issues Anticoagulant Event Alert

MONDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Specific risk reduction strategies can help prevent errors in the administration of anticoagulants that often result in harm or death, according to a Sentinel Event Alert published Sept. 24 by The Joint Commission, which accredits and certifies more than 15,000 health care organizations and programs in the United States.

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Candesartan Benefits Diabetes-Related Retinopathy

FRIDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with type 1 diabetes and no existing retinopathy are less likely to develop the condition if they are treated with candesartan, but the drug does not have a beneficial effect in patients who already have retinopathy, according to a report published online Sept. 26 in The Lancet. A second study indicates that candesartan can lead to improvement of retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes and mild to moderate retinopathy.

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Glucose Watch in Pregnancy Cuts Risk of Complications

FRIDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetic women whose blood sugar is continuously monitored during pregnancy are more likely to have better glycemic control in the third trimester, and their babies have a lower birth weight and reduced risk of macrosomia, according to research published Sept. 25 in BMJ Online First.

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Liraglutide Is Safe, Effective Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

THURSDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, treatment with liraglutide produces better results than glimepiride in terms of reduced glycosylated hemoglobin, weight, hypoglycemia and blood pressure, according to the results of a study published online Sept. 25 in The Lancet.

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Bisphosphonate Infusion Linked to Ocular Complication

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians should be aware that bisphosphonate infusions can result in a serious but rare complication: orbital inflammatory disease, according to a case study published in the Sept. 25 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Insulin Resistance Varies in Liver, Skeletal Muscle

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The rapid onset of insulin resistance following hemorrhage appears to involve glucocorticoids in skeletal muscle, but not the liver, according to research published online Sept. 18 in Endocrinology.

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Physical Activity Increases Exercise Efficiency

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Increases in physical activity lead to enhanced exercise efficiency in previously sedentary, overweight patients, while weight loss alone does not significantly improve exercise efficiency, according to research published in the September issue of the Journal of Applied Physiology.

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Retinal Photography Feasible in Primary Care

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Primary care clinicians can achieve reasonable accuracy in screening for diabetic retinopathy utilizing images from a retinal camera, but additional training may be necessary to identify other abnormalities that ophthalmologists feel need referral, according to a report published in the September/October issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Nasal Insulin Doesn't Prevent Type 1 Diabetes in At-Risk Kids

TUESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Prophylactic administration of nasal insulin soon after birth does not prevent children with HLA genotypes and autoantibodies from developing type 1 diabetes, nor does it delay onset of the disease, according to research published online Sept. 23 in The Lancet.

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Thyroid Dysfunction Linked to Heart Failure in Elderly

TUESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly individuals with severe subclinical hypothyroidism have a higher incidence of heart failure, according to study findings published in the Sept. 30 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Bone Health Stable After Rapid Weight Loss in Young Adults

MONDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Calorie restriction in overweight adults may lead to significant, favorable changes in body composition without affecting bone health over a six-month period, researchers report in the Sept. 22 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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No Change to 2009 Part B Medicare Premium

MONDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- There will be no change to the Part B Standard Medicare premium in 2009 compared with 2008. This is the first time since 2000 that the premium has not risen over the prior year, according to an announcement by the Department of Health and Human Services' Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).

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Uric Acid Levels Linked to Kidney Disease

MONDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Elevated uric acid levels are associated with an increased risk of kidney disease, according to the results of a study published online Sept. 17 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Antibiotic Resistance Has Become a Global Pandemic

FRIDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- A concerted international and national response, behavior change by consumers and providers, and the development of antibacterial agents are all urgently needed to tackle the global problem of rapidly increasing antibiotic resistance, according to an article published online Sept. 18 in BMJ.

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Healthy Middle-Age Lifestyle Halves Women's Risk of Death

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Middle-aged women who avoid smoking, maintain a healthy body weight, get regular exercise and eat a diet low in red meat and trans-fats can reduce their risk of premature death by more than half, according to study findings published online Sept. 16 in BMJ.

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Factors Associated with Plavix Response Identified

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity, diabetes mellitus and elevated plasma fibrinogen are associated with reduced platelet inhibition in patients with cardiovascular disease treated with clopidogrel (Plavix), according to the results of a study published in the Sept. 23 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Bisphenol A Concentrations Linked to Chronic Diseases

TUESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- People with higher urinary levels of Bisphenol A (BPA) -- a chemical compound widely used in epoxy resins lining food and beverage containers -- may have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and liver-enzyme abnormalities, researchers report in the Sept. 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Premixed Insulin Analogues Compare Well with Other Meds

TUESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Premixed insulin analogues may offer tighter glycemic control than long-acting insulin analogues or non-insulin agents in adults with type 2 diabetes, according to research published online Sept. 16 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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New Osteoporosis Clinical Practice Guideline Released

TUESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Among all patients with osteoporosis or a history of fragility fractures, pharmacologic treatment should be offered to reduce fracture risk, according to a new Clinical Practice Guideline published in the Sept. 16 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Diabetes and Pouch Size Affect Efficacy of Gastric Bypass

MONDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Although gastric bypass surgery patients are usually successful in losing weight, those with diabetes or a larger pouch size are more likely than other patients to have disappointing weight loss after surgery, according to a report published in the September issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Newer Schizophrenia Drugs May Have Metabolic Side Effects

MONDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Second-generation, or atypical, antipsychotic drugs used to treat children and adolescents with early-onset schizophrenia or schizo-affective disorder are not necessarily superior to first-generation drugs, according to an article published online Sept. 15 in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

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Chronic Disease Is Heavy Burden in Developing World

FRIDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Although many countries have made significant progress in reducing mortality, the burden of chronic and non-communicable disease remains heavy and requires integrated strategies to tackle it, according to three papers published in the Sept. 13 issue of The Lancet, which has a special focus on the legacy of the 1978 International Conference on Primary Health Care in Alma-Ata.

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Obesity Linked to Poor Asthma Outcomes

THURSDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Obese individuals with asthma are more likely to have poor asthma outcomes and more asthma-related hospitalizations than normal-weight individuals, according to a study published online in September in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Intensive Diabetes Intervention Successful in Community

THURSDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) is adaptable and can be successfully implemented into a community-based organization with sustainable outcomes, according to a report published online Sept. 9 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Drugs Block Bone Loss But Not Bone Formation

THURSDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- A new class of compounds blocks bone loss without affecting parathyroid hormone-induced bone formation, unlike the bisphosphonate class of drugs used to treat osteoporosis, according to a report published online Sept. 4 in Endocrinology.

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Glucose Control Benefits Long-Lasting for Diabetics

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with type 2 diabetes, the benefits of blood pressure control are lost unless blood pressure control is maintained, while intensive glucose control has long-lasting benefits, according to two studies published online Sept. 10 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Increasing Weight Raises Risk of Premature Heart Attack

TUESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing adiposity decreases the age at which patients experience a first non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). Also, in obese diabetics, a very-low-calorie diet may decrease myocardial triglyceride content and improve diastolic function, according to two studies published in the Sept. 16 issue of Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Postmenopausal Hormone Use Raises Risk of Reflux

TUESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal women who take estrogens, selective estrogen receptor modulators or over-the-counter hormone preparations are more likely to have symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux, according to the results of a study published in the Sept. 8 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Exercise Thwarts Genetic Predisposition Toward Obesity

TUESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Although many people have a genetic predisposition to develop obesity, their risk of obesity can be almost entirely eliminated by high levels of physical activity, according to a report published in the Sept. 8 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Continuous Monitoring Helps Glycemic Control in Diabetics

MONDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Adults with type 1 diabetes whose glucose levels are continuously monitored achieve better glycemic control than those who do not, but there are still barriers to overcome in continuously monitoring children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes, according to a report published online Sept. 8 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Long-Acting Form of Exenatide Found Effective

MONDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with diabetes, treatment with a once-weekly form of exenatide may result in better glycemic control than twice-a-day exenatide, according to the results of a study published online Sept. 8 in The Lancet.

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Metabolic Syndrome Has Adverse Effects on Teens' Hearts

FRIDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Among adolescents aged 14 to 20 years, those with the metabolic syndrome have a higher risk of developing heart problems than those without the metabolic syndrome, according to the results of a study of American Indian teens published in the Sept. 9 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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HIV Infection Linked to More Fractures

FRIDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- HIV-infected patients have a higher prevalence of fracture at multiple sites compared with non-infected individuals, according to research published in the September issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Gastric Bypass Increases Intestinal Glucose Production

FRIDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- A version of gastric bypass surgery in mice is more effective than gastric lap-banding surgery at reducing food intake and increasing insulin sensitivity due to increased intestinal production of glucose, according to study findings published in the Sept. 3 issue of Cell Metabolism.

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Guidelines Set for Management of Primary Aldosteronism

FRIDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Diagnosis of primary aldosteronism, a group of disorders where aldosterone levels are inappropriately high, should be targeted to high-risk groups and treated by mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists or surgery, according to guidelines published in the September issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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High Serum Calcium Linked to Prostate Cancer

THURSDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Men with high levels of serum calcium are at greater risk of developing prostate cancer and dying from the disease, researchers report in the September issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention.

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Obesity Not Linked to Colon Cancer Survival

THURSDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Increased body mass index (BMI) wasn't associated with a higher risk of cancer recurrence or death in individuals with colon cancer, according to research published in the Sept. 1 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Study Probes Genetic Role in Papillary Thyroid Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- In survivors of the Nagasaki and Hiroshima atomic bombings, rearrangements of RET/PTC, rather than BRAFV600E mutation, appear to be closely linked to radiation-associated adult-onset papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), according to research published in the Sept. 1 issue of Cancer Research.

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