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G-Pen May Aid Hypoglycemia With Type 1 Diabetes

The mini-dose glucagon may provide more precise treatment than oral carb

glucose test

MONDAY, Feb. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Mini-dose glucagon administered using a stable, ready-to-use G-Pen Mini glucagon may be an effective option for mild to moderate hypoglycemia in adults with type 1 diabetes, according to a study published online Feb. 9 in Diabetes Care.

Morey W. Haymond, M.D., from the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, and colleagues evaluated mini-dose glucagon in 12 adults with type 1 diabetes using a stable, liquid, ready-to-use preparation. Subcutaneous doses of 75, 150, and 300 µg of nonaqueous glucagon were administered and, at 180 minutes, subjects received insulin, followed in 60 minutes by a second identical dose of glucagon.

The researchers found that for the 75-, 150-, and 300-µg doses, mean (fasting glucose concentrations [mg/dL] were 110, 110, and 109, respectively, increasing maximally at 60 minutes by 33, 64, and 95 mg/dL [all P < 0.001]). The glucose concentrations administered post-insulin were 70, 74, and 70 mg/dL, respectively, with maximal increases of 19, 24, and 43 mg/dL post-glucagon administration (P < 0.02) at 45 to 60 minutes.

"Subcutaneous, nonaqueous, ready-to-use G-Pen Mini glucagon may provide an alternative to oral carbohydrates for the management of anticipated, impending, or mild hypoglycemia in adults with type 1 diabetes," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to Xeris Pharmaceuticals, the maker of the G-Pen.

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