Fast-Acting Insulin Wins OK

Helps diabetics manage hyperglycemia

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TUESDAY, April 20, 2004 (HealthDayNews) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a fast-acting form of insulin for diabetics who experience spikes in blood sugar levels that occur immediately after eating.

The genetically engineered Aventis drug Apidra is designed to take effect sooner but last for less time than natural human insulin in controlling blood glucose spikes that characterize a condition called hyperglycemia, the company said in a statement.

Diabetes is a chronic condition in which the body does not produce or make proper use of insulin, a hormone that converts blood sugar (glucose) into energy. People with diabetes may need different types of insulin at certain times of the day to help manage their blood glucose levels, the company said.

An estimated 18 million people in the United States have diabetes, and as many as 60 percent of them may not be managing their condition properly, the company added.

To learn more about diabetes, visit the American Diabetes Association.

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