January 2013 Briefing - Emergency Medicine

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Emergency Medicine for January 2013. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Updated Guidelines Issued for Care of Acute Ischemic Stroke

THURSDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with acute ischemic stroke, the keys to limiting associated morbidity and mortality include the recognition of stroke, early diagnosis and treatment, and hospital care, according to updated guidelines published online Jan. 31 in Stroke.

Abstract
Full Text

Peds Rotavirus Vaccine Offers Indirect Protection for Adults

THURSDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatric rotavirus vaccinations also decrease the prevalence of the disease in unvaccinated adults, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Majority of Patients Will Consider ICD Deactivation

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) would want ICD deactivation in at least one scenario describing deteriorating health outcomes common in patients approaching the end of life, according to a study published online Jan. 28 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Mortality Risk Up for Patients Admitted on Public Holidays

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Patients admitted to the hospital as emergencies on public holidays have significantly higher seven-day and 30-day mortality than patients admitted on non-holidays, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in the Journal of Emergency Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Flu Vaccine Safe in Children With Severe Egg Allergy

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Children with a history of severe egg allergy, even anaphylaxis, can safely receive a single dose of trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine (TIV), according to a study published in the December issue of the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Moxifloxacin Monotherapy Equivalent to Antibiotic Combo

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Oral monotherapy with moxifloxacin is as efficacious and safe as combination therapy with ciprofloxacin plus amoxicillin/clavulanic acid for treatment of fever in adult patients with cancer and neutropenia who are at low risk of complications, according to a study published online Jan. 28 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Parents Not Too Concerned About Child Abuse of Pain Meds

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Parents are not that concerned about misuse of narcotic pain medicines by their children and teens, according to the University of Michigan's Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health.

More Information

Physicians Commonly Report Unsafe Hospital Workloads

TUESDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians say they often face unsafe hospital workloads, according to a study published online Jan. 28 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

In STEMI, Diabetes Linked to Worse Long-Term Outcomes

TUESDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- In patients undergoing primary angioplasty for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), diabetes is associated with worse long-term outcomes, including mortality, reinfarction, stent thrombosis, and target vessel revascularization (TVR), according to research published online Dec. 28 in Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Brain Scans Show Doctors Empathize With Patients

TUESDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians who empathize with a patient in pain and feel relief when the patient receives effective treatment show activity in brain regions associated with pain relief and reward, according to a study published online Jan. 29 in Molecular Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

ER Visits Up for Misuse of ADHD Stimulants by Young Adults

TUESDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- From 2005 to 2010, there was an increase in the number of emergency department visits involving attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) stimulant medications, with the number of visits increasing significantly among adults aged 18 years or older, according to a study published online Jan. 24 by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

More Information

Even Correctly-Administered NSAIDS Can Cause AKI in Kids

TUESDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-associated acute kidney injury (AKI) accounts for almost 3 percent of pediatric AKI, according to a study published online Jan. 28 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Less CVD Hospitalization When SBP, LDL-C Controlled in T2DM

MONDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with type 2 diabetes with controlled systolic blood pressure (SBP) or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) have significantly lower rates of hospitalization for cardiovascular disease (CVD), especially when both risk factors are controlled, according to research published online Jan. 28 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

CDC: Bisexual Women at Higher Risk of Intimate Partner Violence

FRIDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Lesbians and gay men report lifetime levels of intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexual violence (SV) equivalent to or higher than those reported by heterosexuals, according to data released Jan. 25 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

More Information

FDA Panel Votes for Tougher Restrictions on Hydrocodone

FRIDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- A U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory panel met Thursday and Friday to discuss the fate of certain painkillers that contain the opioid known as hydrocodone, concluding in a vote in favor of moving hydrocodone combination products into the more restrictive Schedule II category of controlled substances.

More Information

CDC: 1,527 Foodborne Disease Outbreaks in 2009 to 2010

FRIDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- In 2009 to 2010, there were 1,527 foodborne disease outbreaks reported, according to research published in the Jan. 25 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

Marked Geographic Variation in Mental Health Medication Use

FRIDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- There is considerable local and regional variation within the United States in the use of antidepressants, antipsychotics, and stimulants, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in Health & Place.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

CDC: Novel Norovirus Replacing Former Dominant Strain

THURSDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A novel strain of norovirus, GII.4 Sydney, which was first detected in Australia in March of last year, was responsible for the majority of norovirus outbreaks in the United States from September through December 2012, according to a report published in the Jan. 25 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

Physician Education Ups Communication for New Meds

THURSDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A physician-targeted education session improves physician communication about newly-prescribed medications, according to a study published in the January/February issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Risk of Death Up for PE Patients With High Plasma Lactate Levels

THURSDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Adult patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE) with elevated plasma lactate levels are at a high risk of death and adverse outcomes, regardless of whether they also present with shock or hypotension; right-sided ventricular dysfunction; or elevation of troponin I, according to research published online Jan. 9 in the Annals of Emergency Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

CPR Duration Inversely Tied to Child Cardiac Arrest Survival

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- For pediatric patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA), the duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is inversely linked to survival and favorable neurologic outcomes, according to a study published online Jan. 22 in Circulation.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Large Teaching Hospitals Face More Readmission Penalties

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Large hospitals, teaching hospitals, and safety-net hospitals (SNHs) are more likely than other hospitals to be penalized under the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program (HRRP), according to a research letter published in the Jan. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Care Transition Initiative Decreases Rehospitalizations

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Communities instituting quality improvement initiatives for care transitions see significant declines in the rate of 30-day rehospitalizations and hospitalizations, according to a study published in the Jan. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

ER Visits Frequent Within 30-Days of Hospital Discharge

TUESDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency department visits account for almost 40 percent of post-discharge acute care encounters; and readmissions within 30-days occur in a considerable proportion of patients hospitalized with heart failure, acute myocardial infarction (MI), and pneumonia, according to two studies published in the Jan. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract - Vashi
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Dharmarajan
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Pediatric Hospitals Highly Variable in Readmission Rates

TUESDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- There is significant variability in readmission rates at pediatric hospitals based on condition treated and admitting hospital, according to a study published in the Jan. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA: First Skin Patch Approved to Treat Migraines

TUESDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Zecuity, a sumatriptan iontophoretic single-use, battery-powered transdermal system, has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for acute treatment of migraine with or without aura in adults.

More Information

USPSTF: Younger Women Should Be Screened for Partner Violence

MONDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Women of childbearing age should be screened for intimate partner violence (IPV) and referred for intervention services if necessary, according to recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), published online Jan. 21 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Evidence Discredits Aggressive UTI Testing in Young Children

MONDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Guidelines recommending aggressive testing of young children with fevers for urinary tract infections (UTIs) should be revisited given the lack of evidence and long-term justification, according to research published online Jan. 11 in the Annals of Emergency Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Not All 'Surviving Sepsis' Intervention Recs Are Adopted

MONDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Not all nursing interventions recommended in the Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) are actually implemented in emergency departments, according to a review published in the January issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

Abstract
Full Text

ERs Need to Focus on Integration Into New Payment Models

FRIDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency care systems need to focus on integrating into new payment models by promoting efficiency and coordinated care, according to an article published online Jan. 2 in the Annals of Emergency Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

In STEMI, C-Reactive Protein at Presentation Predicts MI, Death

FRIDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) measurements at presentation predict subsequent nonfatal MI and cardiac death; and for patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), fetuin-A and CRP have prognostic value, according to two studies published in the Jan. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract - Makrygiannis
Full Text
Abstract - Lim
Full Text

CDC: Flu Activity Continues to Be High Across the United States

FRIDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Flu remains at epidemic proportions across the United States, but flu activity decreased in some areas during the second week of January, according to FluView, a weekly influenza surveillance report prepared by the Influenza Division of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

FluView

Efforts Failed to Up Primary Care, Rural Resident Training

FRIDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The 2005 redistribution of graduate medical education (GME) funds did little to train more residents in primary care and in rural areas, according to a study published in the January issue of Health Affairs.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Venous Thromboembolism, PE Risk Up in IVF Pregnancies

THURSDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women have an increased risk of venous thromboembolism and pulmonary embolism after in vitro fertilization (IVF), especially during the first trimester, according to a study published online Jan. 15 in BMJ.

Full Text

Web Learning Improves Nurses' Triage Skills

THURSDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Web-based learning is effective at standardizing training for triage skills of registered nurses (RNs), according to a review published in the January issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

Abstract
Full Text

Checklists Up Performance in Operating-Room Crises

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Using checklists during operating-room crises can improve surgical care, according to a study published in the Jan. 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Letter to the Editor

Energy Drink-Linked ER Visits Up From 2007 to 2011

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- From 2007 to 2011, the number of emergency department visits involving energy drinks more than doubled, according to a study published online Jan. 10 by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

More Information

Influenza Vaccine in Pregnancy May Reduce Fetal Deaths

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Pandemic influenza A (H1N1) infection in pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of fetal death, and vaccination is associated with a non-significant reduction in the risk of fetal death, according to a study published online Jan. 16 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Selective D-Dimer Testing Strategy Seems Safe, Effective

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with suspected deep venous thrombosis (DVT), selective D-dimer testing is a safe and a more efficient testing strategy than universal testing, according to a study published in the Jan. 15 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Family Docs Are Early Adopters of Electronic Health Records

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Family practice physicians are adopting electronic health record (EHR) systems at a fast pace, with 68 percent using an EHR system by 2011, and 80 percent expected to be users by 2013, according to research published in the January/February issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Older Individuals Have Atypical Stone Presentation

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Older individuals are more likely to have atypical presentation with urolithiasis, according to a study published in the January issue of The Journal of Urology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Racial Disparities Exist in Child's Risk of Ruptured Appendix

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of a ruptured appendix differs based on race and ethnicity and by hospital type among children in California, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

Abstract
Full Text

Even Brief Interruptions Dramatically Increase Errors

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Even momentary interruptions of two to four seconds can significantly affect a person's ability to accurately complete a task requiring considerable thought, according to research published online Jan. 7 in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Prehospital Advanced Airway Use Hurts Neurologic Outcome

TUESDAY, Jan. 15 (HealthDay News) -- For adults with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), the odds of favorable neurologic outcome are significantly reduced with advanced airway management versus conventional bag-valve-mask ventilation, according to a study published in the Jan. 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Certain Online Behaviors of Docs Warrant Investigation

MONDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- There is high consensus among state medical boards regarding the likelihood of probable investigations for certain online behaviors, according to a study published in the Jan. 15 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Top Five Issues for Docs and Patients Identified for 2013

MONDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The top five issues that will impact physicians and patients in 2013 have been identified, according to a report published Dec. 10 by The Physicians Foundation.

More Information

CDC: Flu Activity Remains High in the United States

FRIDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Flu activity remains elevated, according to FluView, a weekly influenza surveillance report prepared by the Influenza Division of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; however, the annual flu vaccine is moderately effective at preventing the disease, according to a report published in the Jan. 11 early-release issue of CDC's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

FluView
Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report

National U.S. Health Care Spending Relatively Stable

FRIDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The growth in national U.S. health care spending was relatively stable in 2011, but growth in personal health care spending accelerated, according to a study published in the January issue of Health Affairs.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

CDC: Rare Blood Disorder Found in Intravenous Drug Users

THURSDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- In 2012, 15 intravenous drug users within a relatively small geographic area developed thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), possibly due to reformulating and injecting an oral pain reliever, according to a report published in the Jan. 11 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

Rate of Non-Medical Use of Rx Pain Meds 4.6 Percent

THURSDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of non-medical use of prescription pain relievers in the past year among individuals aged 12 years and older is estimated at 4.6 percent nationally, with considerable variation between states, according to a study published online Jan. 8 by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

More Information

SPIRIT 2013 Clinical Trial Protocol Guidelines Issued

THURSDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- A panel of experts, including trial investigators, trial coordinators, and representatives from ethics and regulatory agencies, has developed the Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials (SPIRIT) 2013 guidelines for the minimum content of a clinical trial, according to a statement published online Jan. 8 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Americans Sicker, Die Younger Than Other Developed Nations

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Americans have worse health than their peers in high-income countries, according to a report published Jan. 9 by the National Research Council and Institute of Medicine.

More Information

Multiple Stressors Contribute to Readmission Within 30 Days

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one-fifth of Medicare patients discharged from the hospital are readmitted within 30 days, which seems to arise from a combination of factors contributing to patient vulnerability, according to research published in the Jan. 9 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text

Two HTN Meds Plus NSAIDs Ups Acute Kidney Injury Risk

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Use of triple therapy comprising diuretics and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, or angiotensin receptor blockers, together with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with an increased risk of acute kidney injury, particularly in the first 30 days of treatment, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in BMJ.

Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Supplements Fail to Accurately Identify Caffeine Quantity

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- One-quarter of supplements sold on military bases fail to meet minimal legal requirements for listing per-serving amounts of caffeine, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Full Text
Editorial

Number of Adults Using Walk-in Retail Clinics Increasing

TUESDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The popularity of retail and work-based clinics is increasing, with most users satisfied with care, according to a Harris Interactive/HealthDay poll.

More Information

CDC: One in Eight U.S. Women Report Binge Drinking

TUESDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Binge drinking, a risk factor for many health and social issues, is relatively common among women and girls in the United States, and those who binge drink tend to do so often, according to research published in the Jan. 8 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

Health Care Use Dropped Among All During Recession

TUESDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Health care use declined significantly among all races and ethnicities during the recession from 2007 to 2009, with the only ethnic disparity being fewer physician visits by Hispanics compared with whites, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Second Impact Syndrome Endangers Young Athletes

TUESDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Neuroimaging scans performed after first and second head injuries in a high school football player may help physicians better understand a rare and devastating traumatic brain injury, known as second impact syndrome (SIS), that results from premature return to play, according to a case report published online Jan. 1 in the Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text

Shared Savings May Promote Care Coordination Entity Use

MONDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Use of shared savings could encourage individuals who are dually eligible for Medicare and Medicaid to enroll in state-designed care coordination entities (CCEs), according to a perspective piece published online Jan. 2 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text

CDC: Influenza Activity Increasing Across the U.S.

FRIDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Flu season descended on the United States early and hard this winter, with significant increases in flu activity observed over the past month, according to an update issued Jan. 4 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

More Information

Improved Staffing Cuts Medicare Patient Readmissions

FRIDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital nurses with good work environments who are caring for fewer patients have significantly fewer elderly Medicare patients with heart failure, acute myocardial infarction (MI), and pneumonia who are readmitted to the hospital within the first 30 days, according to research published in the January issue of Medical Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Distributing Naloxone to Heroin Users Likely Cost-Effective

FRIDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Distributing naloxone to heroin users for lay administration for overdose reversal would be cost-effective and likely reduce overdose deaths, according to a study published in the Jan. 1 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Measures Recommended to Prevent Gun-Related Injuries

THURSDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Following the tragic shooting on Dec. 14 in Newtown, Conn., measures should be implemented to prevent further gun-related injuries, according to a perspective piece published online Dec. 28 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text

Prevalence of Drowsy Driving About 4 Percent in U.S.

THURSDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of drowsy driving is about 4 percent across 19 states and the District of Columbia, and correlates with other sleep-related characteristics, according to a study published in the Jan. 4 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

Association Between Health Care Cost, Quality Inconsistent

THURSDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The direction of the association between health care cost and quality is unclear, with inconsistent evidence indicating positive, negative, mixed, and indeterminate associations, according to a review published in the Jan. 1 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Ban on Ambulance Diversions Doesn't Worsen ER Crowding

THURSDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- A 2009 ban on ambulance diversion in Massachusetts did not worsen crowding in emergency departments or ambulance turnaround times, according to research published online Dec. 21 in the Annals of Emergency Medicine.

Full Text

Prior Brain Injury Linked to Re-Injury Later in Life

THURSDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults with a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) with loss of consciousness (LOC) have a 2.5- to almost four-fold higher risk of subsequent re-injury later in life, according to research published online Nov. 21 in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Restrictive Transfusion Strategy Safe for Acute GI Bleeding

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 2 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with severe acute gastrointestinal bleeding, a restrictive transfusion approach is safe and effective compared with a liberal approach, according to a study published in the Jan. 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

House Joins Senate to Avert Medicare Cuts

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 2 (HealthDay News) -- The House of Representatives settled on an 11th-hour agreement late Tuesday night that has averted the widespread tax increases and spending cuts that would have gone into effect January 1. This agreement occurred 21 hours after the U.S. Senate did its part to steer the country clear of the "fiscal cliff."

More Information

Surgery Consultation Common After MRI of the Spine

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Almost half of patients whose primary care physicians recommend a lumbosacral or cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan go on to receive a surgical consultation, but few end up undergoing spinal surgery, according to research published in the Jan. 1 issue of Spine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Fibromyalgia May Be Underdiagnosed, More So in Men

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Fibromyalgia may be underdiagnosed in the general population, particularly in men, according to research published online Nov. 30 in Arthritis Care & Research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Physician's Briefing