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January 2011 Briefing - Family Practice

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for January 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Closed-Loop Insulin Delivery Safe in Pregnancy

MONDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Overnight closed-loop insulin delivery appears to be safe among pregnant women, according to a study published in the February issue of Diabetes Care.

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U.S. Dietary Guidelines Recommend Lower Salt Intake

MONDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- The seventh edition of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Dietary Guidelines for Americans was released today, and it calls for Americans to limit their daily sodium intake to less than 2,300 mg, with individuals 51 years of age and older, all blacks, and those with high blood pressure, diabetes, or chronic kidney disease advised to limit their sodium intake to 1,500 mg or less.

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Nocturia Is a Predictive Factor of Mortality

MONDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Nocturia is a strong predictive factor of mortality in men and women younger than 65, with a dose-response pattern of increased mortality risk with increasing number of nightly voiding episodes, according to a study in the February issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Childhood Trauma Indirectly Tied to Obesity in Women

MONDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Women who experience childhood trauma and go on to develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) as adults, may be more likely to have weight problems, according to a study published in the December issue of the Journal of Traumatic Stress.

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Long Febrile Seizures Linked to Developmental Delays

MONDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- A prolonged first febrile seizure is likely to occur at a younger age and is associated with developmental delay, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Air Filters May Reduce Cardiovascular Disease Risk

FRIDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The use of high efficiency particle air (HEPA) filters may help to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease associated with air pollution exposure, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Menopausal Symptoms Linked to Lower Risk of Breast Cancer

FRIDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Women who experience menopausal symptoms and have increased intensity of hot flushes have a reduced risk of postmenopausal breast cancer, according to a study published online Jan. 6 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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C-Reactive Protein Level Does Not Modify Statin Benefit

FRIDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Baseline C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration does not alter the benefit of statin therapy for high-risk patients, according to a study published online Jan. 28 in The Lancet.

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Aortic Dissection Rare in Pregnancy With Bicuspid AV

FRIDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Aortic dissection is rare in women with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) who are pregnant, according to a study published in the January issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Low Birth Weight Impacts Adult Arterial Proportions

FRIDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Higher intima-media thickness (IMT) in young adults born with very low birth weight (VLBW) may be linked to an increased risk for cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in Pediatrics.

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Cancer Patients Unlikely to Seek Help to Quit Smoking

FRIDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Although most patients diagnosed with cancer report receiving advice to quit smoking, less than half of them actually express an interest in joining a smoking cessation program, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in Cancer.

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Diet May Be to Blame for Rise in Asthma Prevalence

FRIDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of asthma is increasing rapidly, and diet has emerged in the last 15 years as a possible culprit. Researchers explore the relationship between diet and asthma in two articles published in the February issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy May Reduce Heart Disease

FRIDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) may decrease the risk of recurrent acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and cardiovascular disease, according to a study published in the Jan. 24 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Few Older Adults Receive Herpes Zoster Vaccination

THURSDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Although the herpes zoster vaccine (HZV) was approved for prevention of shingles by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2006 and recommended for adults aged 60 and older, uptake for the preventive vaccine remains well under 10 percent, according to research published in the February issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Heart Failure Patients in General Wards Have Worse Prognosis

THURSDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with heart failure who are admitted to general hospital wards are at an increased risk of mortality compared to those admitted to cardiology wards, according to a study published online Dec. 20 in Heart.

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Brain Response to Rectal Distension Different in IBS

THURSDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) experience greater brain activation in regions associated with emotional arousal and endogenous pain modulation when subjected to rectal distension, compared to controls, according to a meta-analysis published in the January issue of Gastroenterology.

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Community-Based Exercise Alleviates Arthritis Pain

THURSDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Community-deliverable exercise improves pain and physical function in adults with arthritis and other rheumatic diseases (AORD), according to a meta-analysis published in the January issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Trospium Treatment Effective for Overactive Bladder

THURSDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with trospium chloride extended-release (XR) in men with an overactive bladder (OAB) is effective and safe, according to a study published in the January issue of Urology.

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Targeting Parents Leads to Sustained Child Weight Loss

THURSDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Approaches that specifically target parents can result in significant weight loss in moderately obese prepubertal children, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in Pediatrics.

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Smoking Explains Much of Europe's Mortality Gender Gap

THURSDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking appears to account for 40 to 60 percent of the gender gap in mortality across Europe, according to research published online Jan. 12 in Tobacco Control.

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Financial Incentive Has No Effect on Hypertension Care

THURSDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Introduction of pay for performance had no effect on the processes of care or on hypertension-related clinical outcomes in the United Kingdom, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in BMJ.

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Abortion May Not Increase Psychiatric Problems

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Women do not appear more likely to seek out psychiatric help after a first-trimester abortion than before one, according to research published in the Jan. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Diabetes Prevalence Reaches 26 Million in United States

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 26 million people in the United States have diabetes, and 79 million U.S. adults are estimated to have prediabetes, according to new estimates released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Breast Implants May Be Associated With Rare Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Saline or silicone gel-filled breast implants may be associated with anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced today. The agency requested that health care professionals report any confirmed cases of the disease in women with implants.

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Traffic Noise Tied to Increased Stroke Risk in Elderly

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to residential road traffic noise is associated with an increased risk of stroke in people older than 64.5 years of age, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in the European Heart Journal.

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Parental History Independently Predicts Myocardial Infarction

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Parental history (PH) of myocardial infarction (MI) is an independent predictor of future MI, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Race-Concordance Not Related to Best Obesity Care

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Obese black patients receive less exercise counseling and may receive less weight-reduction counseling than their white counterparts, regardless of patient-physician race concordance, according to research published online Jan. 13 in Obesity.

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Electronic Health Records May Not Improve Care Quality

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic health records (EHRs) and clinical decision support (CDS) do not appear to improve the quality of clinical care, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Antioxidant Supplementation May Improve Male Fertility

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Antioxidant supplementation in subfertile men may increase the likelihood of pregnancy and live births for couples undergoing assisted reproduction techniques, according to a review published online Jan. 19 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

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Recombinant Human Prolactin Increases Milk Volume

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with recombinant human prolactin (r-hPRL) increases milk volume, induces changes in milk composition similar to those that take place in regular lactogenesis, and increases antimicrobially active oligosaccharide concentrations for women who have both prolactin deficiency and lactation insufficiency, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in Pediatrics.

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Contrast-Stress Echocardiography Predicts Coronary Syndromes

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise-electrocardiogram testing may not accurately predict the risk of a cardiovascular event in patients with nondiagnostic electrocardiographic findings and normal 12-hour cardiac troponin levels, as compared to contrast-stress echocardiograms, according to a study published in the Jan. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Behavioral Treatment Reduces Insomnia in Older Adults

TUESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Brief behavioral treatment for insomnia (BBTI) is an effective and durable intervention for older adults with chronic insomnia, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Smoking, Obesity Contribute to Poor U.S. Longevity

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Life expectancy in the United States is lower than in many other high-income nations due in large part to the nation's history of heavy smoking and current high obesity levels, according to a report published online Jan. 25, by the National Research Council.

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Allegra Approved for Over-the-Counter Sale

TUESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Sanofi-Aventis' prescription non-drowsy antihistamine, Allegra (fexofenadine), has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for over-the-counter sale, the company said Tuesday.

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Extra Implanted Defibrillator Shocks Raise Mortality

TUESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Inappropriate shocks by implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) are associated with a higher mortality risk, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Projected Heart Disease Care Costs to Triple by 2030

TUESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- If current rates continue, the cost of treating cardiovascular disease (CVD) is likely to increase three-fold within the next two decades, according to a policy statement published online Jan. 24 in Circulation.

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Physicians Lacking Intrauterine Contraception Knowledge

TUESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Family physicians have training and knowledge gaps that result in missed opportunities to offer intrauterine contraception (IUC) as a form of birth control to eligible patients, according to a study published online Dec. 3 in Contraception.

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False-Positive Mammogram Results Affect Quality of Life

TUESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Women who receive false-positive results from routine breast cancer screenings may experience a low quality of life and feelings of anxiety for at least one year, according to a study published online Dec. 20 in the British Journal of Surgery.

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Rotavirus Vaccination Prevents Hospital-Acquired Infection

TUESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of community-based rotavirus vaccination is linked to a reduction in the number of children who are hospitalized with community-acquired rotavirus infection, and may prevent hospitalized children from getting infected with rotavirus, according to research published online Jan. 24 in Pediatrics.

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Smoking Tied to Modest Increase in Breast Cancer Risk

TUESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Active smoking has a modest effect on the risk of developing breast cancer, according to a study published in the Jan. 24 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Lowering BP in Women Reduces Heart Disease Risk

TUESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- High systolic blood pressure (BP) appears to be a substantial risk factor for cardiovascular events in women middle-aged and older, and many of these events are potentially preventable with lowered BP, according to research published online Jan. 24 in Hypertension.

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Long-Term Decline in Abortion Incidence Stalls

MONDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The long-term decline in abortion incidence appears to have leveled off, and antiabortion harassment among providers is high in some regions, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health.

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Substantial Source of Dosing Error Found for Pediatric Patients

MONDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Current equipment does not permit accurate volume measurements of less than 0.1 mL; consequently there is a substantial risk of dosing error in intravenous medication doses that require small volumes to be administered to pediatric patients, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Biologics Effective, but Pricy, to Treat Juvenile Arthritis

MONDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Biologics are more effective than methotrexate (MTX) in achieving a short-term response in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) who have had previous suboptimal response to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, according to research published in the January issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Insufficient Sleep Increases Health Risk in Children

MONDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Shorter sleep duration and more variable sleep patterns are associated with adverse metabolic outcomes, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in Pediatrics.

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Estimated Cost of Obesity Is $300 Billion Per Year

MONDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The economic cost of overweight and obesity is estimated at $300 billion per year in the United States and Canada, with 90 percent of the total cost attributed to the United States, according to a study published in December by the Society of Actuaries.

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Pharmacist Involvement Improves Disease Management

MONDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- When pharmacists are added to primary care teams, patients with type 2 diabetes achieve better blood pressure control, according to a study published in the January issue of Diabetes Care.

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Amputation Level Affects Energy Expenditure in Children

FRIDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Children with a below-knee amputation are able to maintain normal walking speed without significantly increasing their energy cost, whereas those with above-knee amputations walk slower and expend more energy, according to a study published in the Jan. 5 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Suicide Risk, Accidental Death Increased in Fibromyalgia

FRIDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Patients suffering from fibromyalgia do not appear to be at increased risk for mortality, but the risk of death as a result of suicide and accidents is increased, according to a study in the January issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Follow-Up Programs Tied to Early Melanoma Detection

FRIDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Including patients at high risk for melanoma in follow-up programs can result in detection of early-stage disease, and a lower percentage of primary care physicians than dermatologists perform full-body skin examinations on patients, according two studies published in the January issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Physical Exam Helps Diagnose Source of Lumbar Pain

FRIDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) Physical examination tests can help diagnose the presence of nerve root impingement in the low lumbar and midlumbar regions as well as pinpoint level specific impingement in the low lumbar region, according to a study published in the Jan. 1 issue of Spine.

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Atrial Fibrillation Risk Increased by Alcohol Intake

FRIDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Alcohol consumption increases the risk of atrial fibrillation (AF), according to a meta-analysis published in the Jan. 25 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Sleep Study May Predict Post-Op Issues in Children

FRIDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The use of polysomnography (PSG) prior to adenotonsillectomy may be useful in predicting which patients are at increased risk for postoperative respiratory complications following adenotonsillectomy, according to a study published in the January issue of Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Risk-Specific Health Advice May Motivate Change

FRIDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Preventive recommendations tailored to an individual's specific family history of common diseases may impact positively on dietary intake and exercise behaviors, according to a study published in the January/February issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Elevation of Serum Uric Acid Level Associated With Diabetes

FRIDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Elevation of serum uric acid (SUA) levels is associated with an increased risk of developing new-onset diabetes in hypertensive patients, according to results from a study published in the January issue of Diabetes Care.

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Motivation Affects Return to Work After Knee Replacement

FRIDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty are likely to return to work faster if they are highly motivated, regardless of the physical demands of their job, according to a study published in the Jan. 5 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Storytelling Intervention Helps Uncontrolled Hypertension

FRIDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Storytelling intervention may result in blood pressure reduction in black patients with uncontrolled hypertension, according to a study published in the Jan. 18 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Predeployment Screen Linked to Fewer Mental Health Issues

FRIDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Predeployment mental health screening in soldiers is associated with reductions in occupationally impairing mental health problems, fewer medical evacuations due to mental health reasons, and less suicidal ideation while deployed, according to a study published online Jan. 18 in The American Journal of Psychiatry.

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In Busy Hospitals, Congestive Heart Failure Outcomes Better

THURSDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Experience with treating congestive heart failure, as measured by hospital volume, is associated with decreased mortality and fewer readmissions; but the cost per patient is higher, according to a study published in the Jan. 18 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Cardiovascular Risk Clustering in Adolescents Useful

THURSDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiovascular risk clustering -- the presence of two or more cardiovascular risk factors -- may indicate abnormal vascular function in adolescents and can be a reliable tool for use in clinical practice, according to research published online Jan. 17 in Pediatrics.

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CDC: Reported Influenza-Like Illness Widespread in 2009-10

THURSDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- A relatively large proportion of the U.S. population reported experiencing symptoms of influenza-like illness (ILI) during the 2009 to 2010 influenza season, and many of them reported seeking health care for those symptoms, according to data published in the Jan. 21 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Maternal Grief May Predict Infant Attachment Security

THURSDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Resolution of maternal grief following the experience of preterm birth, and the subsequent quality of maternal interactions, have important implications for attachment security development in premature infants, according to a study published online Jan. 17 in Pediatrics.

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Social Ties Linked to Weight, Dieting Among Young Adults

THURSDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight young adults are more likely to have overweight family members and friends than are normal-weight peers, and may be more influenced to lose weight if those around them are dieting, according to a study published online Dec. 16 in Obesity.

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Alternative Therapies Offered by Many Hospice Care Providers

THURSDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Approximately 40 percent of hospice care providers offer complementary and alternative therapies (CAT) -- including massage, supportive group therapy, and music therapy -- or have a CAT provider under contract or on staff, according to a report in the Jan. 19 issue of U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Health Statistics Reports.

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Genetics May Contribute to Hypothalamic Amenorrhea

THURSDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Rare variants in genes associated with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism are found in some women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea, according to research published in the Jan. 20 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Evidence Limited on Statins for Primary Prevention

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- There is not enough evidence to support the widespread use of statins in individuals with no history of cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to a review published in The Cochrane Library.

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Fruit and Vegetable Intake Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Increased consumption of fruits and vegetables is associated with a reduced risk of mortality from ischemic heart disease (IHD), according to a study published online Jan. 18 in the European Heart Journal.

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Bisphosphonates May Improve Survival in Duchenne MD

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- When combined with steroid treatment, bisphosphonate use may improve survival rates in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), according to research published online Jan. 17 in Pediatrics.

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Malaria Vaccine Offers Children Long-Lasting Protection

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The lead candidate malaria vaccine, RTS,S/AS01E, offers long-lasting protection against clinical malaria in healthy African children, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Escitalopram Successfully Reduces Hot Flashes

TUESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Menopausal women treated with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor escitalopram have fewer, and less severe, hot flashes than women taking a placebo, according to a study published in the Jan. 19 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Natroba Approved for Head Lice

TUESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Natroba (spinosad) Topical Suspension 0.9 percent has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat head lice in people aged 4 years and older.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

HIV Transmission During Breast-Feeding Can Be Reduced

TUESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Triple antiretroviral prophylaxis given during late pregnancy and breast-feeding reduces the risk of HIV transmission to infants, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Severe Maternal Psoriasis Linked to Low Birth Weight

TUESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Women with severe psoriasis are 1.4 times more likely to have a low birth weight (LBW) infant, but mild psoriasis is not related to an increased risk of adverse birth outcomes, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Breast-Feeding Linked to Increased Strength in Teens

TUESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Breast-feeding duration may play a role in determining adolescent lower-body explosive strength, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of the Journal of Nutrition.

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Updated Osteoporosis Screening Recommendations Issued

TUESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has issued an updated statement recommending that women aged 65 years or older, and younger women with an increased risk of fractures, should be screened for osteoporosis; the statement has been published online Jan. 17 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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New Guidelines Released on Fall Prevention in the Elderly

TUESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The American Geriatrics Society and the British Geriatric Society have issued new guidelines on the prevention of falls in older persons; a summary has been published in the January issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Repeated Acetaminophen Can Cause Infant Liver Failure

TUESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Acetaminophen is generally considered child-safe, but repeated doses in infants can result in acute liver failure, according to a case report published online Jan. 17 in Pediatrics.

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One in Five Americans Lacks Usual Source of Care

TUESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- More than 20 percent of Americans do not have a usual source for health care, such as local clinic or family practitioner, according to a statistical brief released by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ): "Main Reason for Not Having a Usual Source of Care: Differences by Race/Ethnicity, Income, and Insurance Status, 2007."

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Chemical Exposure Tied to Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes

MONDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Women with occupational exposure to phthalates or pesticides appear to have a higher risk of adverse fertility and pregnancy outcomes, including prolonged time to pregnancy (TTP) and lower birth weight, according to a study published online Dec. 20 in Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

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Macrolides Mixed With BP Drugs Can Lead to Hypotension

MONDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Simultaneous use of calcium-channel blockers and some macrolide antibiotics may result in hypotension, which may require hospital admission, according to a study published online Jan. 17 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Community Intervention May Improve Newborn Survival

MONDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Community-based interventions led by trained "lady health workers" (LHWs) have the potential to reduce the neonatal mortality rate in Pakistan, according to research published online Jan. 15 in The Lancet.

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More Cigarette Ad Exposure Leads to More Teen Smoking

MONDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to cigarette advertisements, but not other advertisements, is associated with initiation of adolescent smoking, according a study published online Jan. 17 in Pediatrics.

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Pathological Gaming Tied to Depression, Anxiety in Kids

MONDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Pathological gaming is not simply a symptom of comorbid disorders, and can last for years, according to research published online Jan. 17 in Pediatrics.

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New Practice Guidelines for Pediatric Tonsillectomy Patients

MONDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- New evidence-based guidelines surrounding the pre-, intra-, and postoperative care and management of pediatric patients undergoing tonsillectomy have been published in a supplement to the January issue of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery.

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Breast-Feeding Recommendations Challenged

FRIDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In light of new evidence, the 2001 World Health Organization (WHO) recommendation to exclusively breast-feed for six months has been called into question, according to an analysis published online Jan. 13 in BMJ.

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Low Medication Adherence After Myocardial Infarction

FRIDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term adherence to medications following myocardial infarction (MI) in elderly patients is poor, and it is significantly worse among those with kidney dysfunction, according to a study published online Jan. 13 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Nursing Home Closures More Likely in Minority, Poor Areas

FRIDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Nursing home closures appear to be concentrated in neighborhoods with higher minority populations and/or lower wealth, according to research published online Jan. 10 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Exercise Helps Patients With Heart Failure Fight Depression

FRIDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Structured exercise training (ET) may decrease depressive symptoms, resulting in improved long-term survival, in patients with heart failure, according to a study published in the January issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Higher Step Count Linked to Better Insulin Sensitivity

FRIDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Higher daily step activity is associated with lower body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio as well as better insulin sensitivity, according to research published online Jan. 13 in BMJ.

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Low-Income Black Moms Often Provide Solid Foods Early

FRIDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Early complementary feeding (CF) appears to be highly prevalent among low-income, black, first-time mothers, with maternal perception of infant temperament, breast-feeding, and maternal obesity as well as depression significantly associated with early CF, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in Pediatrics.

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Atrial Fibrillation on the Rise in Hemodialysis Patients

FRIDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) diagnosed in American patients who receive hemodialysis is rising and is associated with considerably increased mortality, according to research published online Jan. 13 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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CDC Report Highlights Important Health Disparities

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Among Americans, disparities in income, race and ethnicity, gender, and other social attributes have an impact on whether an individual is healthy or ill or will die prematurely, according to a report by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, released as a supplement to the Jan. 14 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Spine Specialists May Not Recognize Patients' Distress

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Spinal surgeons relying on their clinical impression often do not accurately identify patients in psychological distress, according to a study published in the Dec. 15 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Mediterranean Diet May Help Prevent Diabetes

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Non-calorie-restricted Mediterranean diets (MedDiets) high in unsaturated fat can help prevent diabetes onset in people at high cardiovascular risk, according to research published in the January issue of Diabetes Care.

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FDA Limits Acetaminophen in Combo Prescription Products

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is requesting that manufacturers of prescription combination products containing acetaminophen limit the amount of acetaminophen to a maximum of 325 mg in each tablet or capsule to reduce the risk of liver toxicity. In addition, the agency is directing manufacturers to update labels of all prescription combination products to warn consumers of the possible risk for severe liver injury.

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Organ Donors From Mortalities in Neonatal ICUs Identified

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- The identification of theoretically eligible infant donors in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) is described in a study published in the January issue of The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Men More Open to HPV Vaccine If Framed As Averting Cancer

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Men are more willing to receive the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine when they learn that it also prevents HPV-related cancers as opposed to solely genital warts, according to research published in the August issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Optimism May Protect Teens From Depression

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Optimistic thinking may provide protection against some adolescent health risks, including depressive symptoms and substance use, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in Pediatrics.

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High Cost of Hospitalization for Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Ambulatory treatment, either in emergency rooms or outpatient clinics, was more cost-effective than hospitalizing teen girls with pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), according to a study published online Nov. 5 in Sexually Transmitted Diseases.

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Evidence Used for Clinical Guidelines May Be Weak

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Most clinical practice guidelines put out by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) are based on weaker, expert opinion-based evidence rather than more robust, randomized trial-based evidence, according to research published in the Jan. 10 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Anti-Epileptic Drugs Increase Risk of Fractures

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) may increase the risk of nontraumatic fractures in patients aged 50 and older, according to a study published in the January issue of the Archives of Neurology.

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Cost of Cancer Care May Increase 39 Percent by 2020

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Estimates and projections of the medical cost of cancer care in the United States through 2020 indicate that this cost may increase by at least 27 percent and potentially up to 39 percent, according to research published online Jan. 12 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Combination Therapy Bests Monotherapy for BP Control

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- In individuals with high blood pressure, a combination drug therapy given initially appears to result in better blood pressure control than monotherapy, and patients who undergo the two-drug treatment after taking the single-drug therapy also experience better blood pressure outcomes, though not at the same level as those who began with the combination treatment, according to research published online Jan. 13 in The Lancet.

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Prolonged Sitting Associated With Adverse Health Markers

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Prolonged periods of sedentary time without breaks are associated with worse indicators of cardio-metabolic function and inflammation, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in the European Heart Journal.

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Antibiotics Benefit Acute Ear Infections in Young Children

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Children with acute otitis media appear to benefit from antimicrobial treatment with amoxicillin-clavulanate, according to two articles published in the Jan. 13 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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CDC: 8 Percent of Individuals in U.S. Have Asthma

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- More than 8 percent of people in the United States have asthma, and the condition is associated with substantial loss of work and school days as well as increases in emergency department visits and hospitalizations, according to a study published in the Jan. 12 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Health Statistics Reports.

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Bottle Rockets Tied to Significant Ocular Injuries

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Bottle rockets are associated with significant ocular injuries among children and adolescents, including permanent loss of vision, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Mom's Depression Lowers Epileptic Child's Quality of Life

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Depressive symptoms in mothers negatively impact health-related quality of life (HRQL) of their children with new-onset epilepsy during the first 24 months from diagnosis, according to research published online Nov. 3 in Epilepsia.

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Number of Adults Treated for Diabetes Doubled in a Decade

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- The number of Americans who receive medical treatment for diabetes has more than doubled since 1996, and so have expenditures related to the treatment of the disease, according to a statistical brief released by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ): "Trends in Use and Expenditures for Diabetes among Adults 18 and Older, U.S. Civilian Noninstitutionalized Population, 1996 and 2007."

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Multiplexed Maternal Plasma Sequencing Detects Trisomy 21

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Multiplexed maternal plasma DNA sequencing analysis could be used in high-risk pregnancies to rule out fetal trisomy 21, rendering invasive diagnostic procedures unnecessary if referrals are based on sequencing results, according to a study published Jan. 11 in BMJ.

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Analysis Supports Cardiovascular Concern With NSAIDs

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Commonly used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may increase the risk of heart attack, stroke, and death, according to a meta-analysis published Jan. 11 in BMJ.

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Behavioral Therapy Reduces Incontinence After Surgery

TUESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Behavioral therapy may help to significantly reduce persistent postprostatectomy incontinence, according to a study published in the Jan. 12 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Vaccine Reduces Risk of Herpes Zoster

TUESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Receipt of the herpes zoster vaccine among immunocompetent community-dwelling adults aged 60 and older is associated with a reduced incidence of herpes zoster, ophthalmic herpes zoster, and hospitalizations for herpes zoster, according to a study published in the Jan. 12 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Prolonged Screen Time Linked to Cardiovascular Disease

TUESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Prolonged screen-based entertainment is associated with an increase in overall mortality and cardiovascular disease (CVD) events, according to a study published in the Jan. 18 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Teen Sugar Intake May Raise Cardiovascular Disease Risk

TUESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Added sugar consumption during adolescence may correlate with several risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to a study published online Jan. 10 in Circulation.

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Aspirin Use in High-Risk Individuals Is Suboptimal

TUESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Among individuals at increased or high risk for coronary heart disease, fewer blacks, Hispanics, and Chinese adhere to a regular aspirin regimen than do whites, and regular aspirin use overall is relatively low, according to a study published in the January issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Mediterranean Diet May Reduce Rate of Cognitive Decline

TUESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Following a Mediterranean diet may reduce the rate of cognitive decline in older adults, according to a study published online Dec. 22 the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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FDA Warns of Morphine Sulfate Oral Solution Overdose

TUESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Roxane Laboratories have notified health care professionals of serious adverse events and deaths associated with accidental overdose of morphine sulfate oral solutions, especially with the high potency (100 mg per 5 mL) product. In most cases, solutions ordered in milligrams (mg) were mistakenly interchanged for milliliters (mL) of the product.

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Corticosteroid Use May Shorten Children's Hospital Stays

TUESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The use of adjunct corticosteroids in children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is associated with shortened lengths of stay (LOS) in the hospital, especially those patients who receive concomitant β-agonist therapy, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in Pediatrics.

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Parents' Smoking Is a Risk Factor for Children's High BP

TUESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- In addition to other familial and environmental risk factors, parental smoking is an independent risk factor for higher blood pressure in healthy preschool children, according to research published online Jan. 10 in Circulation.

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Obesity Prevalent Among 2009 H1N1-Infected Californians

TUESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- One-half of Californians ≥20 years of age hospitalized with 2009 H1N1 infection were obese, with extreme obesity associated with increased odds of death, according to a study published online Jan. 4 in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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Burnout Levels Particularly High in Residents

MONDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of burnout and risk for burnout are high in physicians, particularly residents, and more than a quarter of anesthesiology chairs meet criteria for high burnout, according to two articles published in the January issue of Anesthesiology.

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For Teen Athletes, Concussion Symptoms Differ by Gender

MONDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- High school-age boys and girls tend to present with different symptoms after a concussion, but their recovery time is the same, according to research published in the January/February issue of the Journal of Athletic Training.

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Absence of Macrosomia May Be Predicted by Two Sonograms

MONDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The absence of fetal overgrowth in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) was found to be reliably predicted by two serial sonographic abdominal circumference measurements, according to research published in the January issue of Diabetes Care.

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Closely Spaced Pregnancies May Raise Odds of Autism

MONDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Second-born children born after an interpregnancy interval (IPI) of less than one year appear to be at a substantially higher risk of autism than those with IPIs of at least 36 months, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in Pediatrics.

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Physical Activity Lowers Risk of Colon Cancer Death

MONDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- People who participate in long-term physical activity have a decreased risk of death from colon cancer, according to a study published in the December issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Clinicians Not Adhering to Arthritis Guidelines

MONDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Clinicians are not following evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of osteoarthritis (OA), despite the consistency among the numerous guidelines available, according to a review published in the January issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Fish-Oil Lipid Emulsion Lowers Retinopathy Risk

FRIDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Administration of a fish-oil-based lipid emulsion in very-low-birth-weight infants may be useful for prophylaxis of severe retinopathy, according to a study published online Jan. 3 in Pediatrics.

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Majority of Physicians Desire Collaboration in CKD Treatment

FRIDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of kidney specialists and primary care physicians (PCPs) desire collaboration on patient care for those with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but at different points in patient care, according to a study published online Jan. 6 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Scoliosis Screening Costs in Hong Kong, Rochester Similar

FRIDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The costs of an adolescent idiopathic scoliosis school screening program in Hong Kong are comparable with the costs of student screening in Rochester, Minn., the only other location that has undergone a comparable screening program evaluation, according to a study published in the Dec. 15 issue of Spine.

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Male Circumcision Reduces HPV Transmission

FRIDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- In HIV-negative individuals, male circumcision appears to reduce the transmission of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection to female partners, according to research published online Jan. 7 in The Lancet.

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Parenting Programs Improve Childhood Development

THURSDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatric primary care interventions may offer an important opportunity for reducing media exposure in young children and increasing parent-child interactions in low-socioeconomic-status families, according to two studies published in the January issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Bright Light Treatment Improves Nonseasonal Depressive Disorder

THURSDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Bright light treatment (BLT) may improve mood, sleep efficiency, and melatonin level in older adults with major depressive disorder (MDD), but adding a cholinesterase inhibitor, donepezil, to antidepressant treatment may have no benefit in preventing cognitive impairment, according to two studies published in the January issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Back Pain Tied to Psychological Well-Being in Teens

THURSDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Systematic physical activity and control of psychological profile should decrease low back pain (LBP) frequency and intensity in adolescents, according to a study published in the December issue of the Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques.

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Behavioral Interventions in Youths Lower STI Risk

THURSDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Comprehensive behavioral interventions in adolescents can decrease risky sexual behavior and prevent incident sexually transmitted infections (STIs), according to research published online Jan. 3 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Familial Risk for Fatal Cancer As High As for Incident Cancers

THURSDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Familial risks for fatal cancers appear to be at least as high as those for incident cancers for several common cancers, according to a study published online Jan. 4 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Medications Thwart Smokers' Cravings

THURSDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Varenicline and bupropion appear to influence brain pathways associated with cue-induced cravings in smokers, according to two articles published online Jan. 6 in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Rifaximin Improves Irritable Bowel Syndrome Symptoms

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The use of rifaximin for the treatment of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) without constipation appears to improve relief of IBS symptoms, according to research published in the Jan. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Exercise Linked to Lower Mortality in Prostate Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Among men with prostate cancer (PCa), physical activity appears to be associated with lower overall mortality risk and a lower risk of PCa mortality, according to a study published online Jan. 4 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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FDA: Equivalence Reviews Required for Tobacco Products

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced today that certain tobacco products, including cigarettes, roll-your-own tobacco, and all smokeless products, introduced or changed in the United States after Feb. 15, 2007, must be reviewed by the agency. In its newly published guidance, the agency says that any company marketing a tobacco product must prove that the product is "substantially equivalent" to products commercially available on Feb. 15, 2007.

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Obesity Negatively Impacts Fibromyalgia Symptoms

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity is common in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and appears to adversely impact the severity of the condition, according to research published in the December issue of the Journal of Pain.

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Severe Skin Lesions Can Cause IBD Patients to Quit Therapy

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Severe skin lesions cause patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to discontinue anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) therapy, according to research published in the December issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Imaging With Ionizing Radiation Common in Children

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The use of diagnostic imaging procedures with ionizing radiation appears to be common among children, according to a study published online Jan. 3 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Depression/Diabetes Combo May Raise Mortality Risk

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The combined presence of depression and diabetes mellitus among older women appears to be associated with a particularly increased risk of all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, according to a study in the January issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Lifestyle Affects Lipid Levels in Transition to Adulthood

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Lifestyle factors such as weight gain, smoking, and loss of fitness influence the development of risk levels for blood lipid and lipoprotein as people transition from youth to adulthood, according to research published in the January issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Familial Alcoholism Risk May Be Linked to Obesity

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Familial alcoholism risk appears to be associated with obesity, especially among women, according to research published in the December issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Gait Speed Associated With Survival in Older Adults

TUESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- In older adults, gait speed appears to be related to survival, according to research published in the Jan. 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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α-Blockers/Antibiotics May Be Best for Prostatitis

TUESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- A combination of α-blockers and antibiotics may result in the greatest relief in symptoms for people with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), according to a literature analysis published in the Jan. 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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CDC: Self-Reported Seat Belt Use in U.S. Has Risen

TUESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Seat belt use has increased nationally, particularly in states with primary enforcement laws, and nonfatal motor vehicle-occupant injuries treated in emergency departments have declined, though they still affect a substantial number of people, according to a report in the Jan. 4 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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FDA: Albuterol Sulfate Inhalation Solution Recalled

TUESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and The Ritedose Corporation have notified health care professionals and consumers of a voluntary recall of 0.083 percent Albuterol Sulfate Inhalation Solution, 3 mL in 25, 30, and 60 unit dose vials, as the 2.5 mg/3 mL single use vials are embossed with the incorrect concentration of 0.5 mg/3 mL. This may pose a health risk to patients, which could result in temporary and medically reversible events or even life-threatening events and death.

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Concussion May Have Little Long-Term Effect on Soldiers

TUESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Although posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) appears to be strongly related to psychosocial outcomes and postconcussive symptoms in soldiers a year after they return from Iraq, concussion/mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) seems to have little impact on these outcomes after PTSD is accounted for, according to research published in the January issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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CPAP Reduces Fatigue in Sleep Apnea Patients

TUESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) may reduce fatigue and increase energy in individuals with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), according to research published in the January issue of SLEEP.

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Many Babies, Toddlers Obese or at Risk of Being So

TUESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- In the United States, a substantial proportion of children between the ages of 9 months and 2 years are obese or at risk of being so, according to research published in the January/February issue of the American Journal of Health Promotion.

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Six Lots of Acetadote Injection Voluntarily Recalled

TUESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Cumberland Pharmaceuticals Inc. have notified health care professionals of a recall of six lots of acetylcysteine (Acetadote) injection (20 percent solution [200 mg/mL] in 30 mL single dose glass vials) due to the potential presence of particulate matter.

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Colonoscopy Offers Strong Protection Against CRC

TUESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Colonoscopy may be associated with a strongly reduced risk for colorectal cancer (CRC), with risk reduction observed for both left-sided and right-sided CRC, according to research published in the Jan. 4 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Hospitalizations Fall After Varicella Vaccination Program

TUESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- The number and rate of varicella-related hospitalizations declined significantly after implementation of a one-dose varicella vaccination program in 1995, according to a study published online Jan. 3 in Pediatrics.

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Clostridium Difficile Infection Up in Hospitalized Children

TUESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) appears to be increasing among hospitalized children, with especially high risk among children with inflammatory bowel disease or other conditions requiring antibiotics or immunosuppression, according to a study published online Jan. 3 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Few Performance Tests Measure Low Back Pain Change

MONDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Sit-to-stand and stair-climbing performance tests used to gauge effectiveness of treatment for low back pain are good instruments to use to measure changes over time and to determine the percentage of minimal clinically important change (MCIC), but several other performance tests are not responsive, according to a study published in the Dec. 15 issue of Spine.

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