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July 2007 Briefing - Family Practice

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for July 2007. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Child Abuse in Military More Likely During Deployments

TUESDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Among families of enlisted soldiers in the U.S. Army, the rates of child maltreatment and neglect are higher during combat-related deployments than in other duties, according to a study in the Aug. 1 issue of Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Antibiotics in Children Favor Development of Resistance

TUESDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Children who are prescribed amoxicillin for acute respiratory infection are twice as likely to carry resistant organisms at 2-week follow-up compared to those who do not receive antibiotics, according to a study published online July 26 in BMJ.

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Religious Physicians Not More Likely to Work With Poor

TUESDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians who consider themselves religious are no more likely to provide care for underserved patient populations than those who do not, according to a survey in the July/August issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Marijuana Joint Obstructs Airflow More Than Tobacco

TUESDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- One marijuana joint obstructs airflow in the lungs as much as five tobacco cigarettes, according to a study published online July 31 in Thorax.

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FDA Panel Says Avandia Should Stay Despite Heart Risks

TUESDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- The widely prescribed type 2 diabetes drug Avandia (rosiglitazone) should remain on the market, despite studies that suggest it could increase the risk of myocardial infarction, U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisers said Monday.

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Maternal Smoking Increases Newborn Blood Pressure

MONDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- The systolic blood pressure of newborns whose mothers smoked during pregnancy is significantly higher than that of newborns not exposed to tobacco smoke, according to a study published online July 30 in Hypertension.

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Donepezil Preserves Cognitive Function in Severe Alzheimer's

MONDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- Donepezil treatments appear to be more effective than a placebo at preserving cognitive function in those with severe Alzheimer disease, according to a report in the July 31 issue of Neurology.

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At Least 18 Cryptosporidiosis Outbreaks in 2006

MONDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- At least 18 outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis occurred in the United States in 2006, most of them associated with exposure to pools and water parks, according to a report in the July 27 issue of Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Because Cryptosporidium oocysts can survive in chlorinated water, public education and new ways to disinfect recreational water facilities are needed to combat the parasite.

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Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy Unneeded in Most Skin Cancer

MONDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with high-risk nonmelanoma skin cancer, the yield from sentinel lymph node biopsy may be too low to justify its routine use, according to a small study published in the July issue of Dermatologic Surgery.

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Quickly Suspending Drinking Driver's Licenses Saves Lives

MONDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- Preconviction driver's license suspension among adults immediately upon failure to pass an alcohol breath test may save as many as 800 lives a year by reducing the rate of future fatal crashes, according to a new study published in the August issue of the Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

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Study Confirms Poor Outcomes in Chronic Hepatitis C

MONDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- One-third of a cohort of patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) during the 1970s have developed advanced liver disease, according to a study published in the July Journal of Hepatology, highlighting the importance of identifying and treating HCV infection.

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Combination Laser Therapy Helps Reduce Wrinkles

MONDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- A combination of infrared and radiofrequency irradiation produces mild to moderate improvements in facial skin laxity with few complications, according to a report published July 20 in Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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Interleukin-7 Receptor Gene Linked to Multiple Sclerosis

MONDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- An international team of researchers has discovered that variants of the interleukin-7 receptor α (IL7Rα) gene increase the risk of multiple sclerosis. The findings were published online July 29 in two studies in Nature Genetics and confirmed in a third, which was released early by the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract - Haines
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Abstract - Hillert
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Taribavirin Shows Promise for Chronic Hepatitis C

MONDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- When given in combination with pegylated interferon for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C (CHC), taribavirin and ribavirin produce similar rates of sustained virological response, but taribavirin is less likely to cause severe anemia, according to a study in the July issue of the Journal of Hepatology.

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FDA to Allow Use of Zelnorm in Select Patients

FRIDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Friday that it will allow restricted use of Zelnorm (tegaserod maleate) in female patients under 55 with chronic constipation that is idiopathic or related to irritable bowel syndrome.

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FDA Halts Gene Therapy Trial After Patient's Death

FRIDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Friday that it had halted a gene therapy trial after Targeted Genetics Corporation of Seattle reported that a patient in the trial had died.

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Agent Orange May Boost Hypertension Risk

FRIDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to the defoliant herbicide Agent Orange during the Vietnam War may be raising blood pressure levels for the aging veterans of that conflict.

More Information - Institute of Medicine

Thiazolinediones Double Risk of Heart Failure in Diabetes

FRIDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Thiazolinediones may double the risk of heart failure in patients with type 2 diabetes, according to a report in the August issue of Diabetes Care, which was first published online in May.

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Polar Expedition Can Cause Mental Highs and Lows

FRIDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Polar expeditions can have both positive and negative effects on the psyche, according to a study published in the July 26 issue of The Lancet.

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Sumatriptan Helps Combat Mountain Sickness

FRIDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Prophylaxis with sumatriptan is effective in preventing acute mountain sickness (AMS), according to a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial study published in the June 2007 issue of Annals of Neurology.

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Stress Levels High in Mothers of Children With Eczema

FRIDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Mothers of young children with eczema experience as much stress as mothers of children with chronic diseases or disabilities, according to a study in the August issue of Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Polyethylene Glycol Beneficial for Chronic Constipation

FRIDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Polyethylene glycol is a safe and efficacious long-term treatment for chronic constipation, even among the elderly, according to a report published in the July issue of the American Journal of Gastroenterology.

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Teens Who Drink Alcohol Tend to Consume Liquor

FRIDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Liquor is the alcoholic beverage of choice for U.S. high school students who report current alcohol use or binge drinking, according to the first state-specific analysis of the types of alcoholic beverages consumed by high school students. The findings appear in the July 27 issue of Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, a publication of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Marijuana Associated With Higher Psychosis Risk

FRIDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Marijuana use is associated with about a 40 percent increase in the risk of psychosis, with the risk increasing with more frequent use, according to a study in the July 28 issue of The Lancet.

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Redundant Nerve Roots Predict Spondylolisthesis Severity

FRIDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with lumbar 4-5 (L4-5) spondylolisthesis, those with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evidence of redundant nerve roots of the cauda equina are more likely to present with severe clinical symptoms, according to the results of a study published in the July issue of the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine.

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Statin Use Associated with Reduced Dementia Risk

FRIDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Simvastatin use is associated with a reduction in dementia and Parkinson disease incidence in patients taking the drug, according to a report published July 19 in BMC Medicine.

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Air Pollution Plus LDL May Spur Atherosclerosis

THURSDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- Diesel exhaust particles may work in conjunction with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol to cause atherosclerosis, suggests a study in cells and mice published online July 26 in Genome Biology.

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Gene Therapy Virus May Cause Liver Cancer

THURSDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- The adeno-associated virus, a possible candidate vector for use in gene therapy, can integrate into the genome of mice and affect the expression of neighboring genes, possibly explaining the development of liver cancer, researchers report in the July 27 issue of Science.

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Many Americans Believe Unsubstantiated Cancer Claims

THURSDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- Many Americans believe unsubstantiated claims regarding cancer, such as that cell phones can cause cancer, according to the results of a study published online July 27 in Cancer. The study found that members of populations most affected by cancer are among the most likely to believe false claims about the disease.

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Early Surgery Urged for Thoracic Myelopathy

THURSDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with thoracic myelopathy, decompressive surgery is more successful in those with a shorter preoperative duration of symptoms and milder myelopathy, suggesting that early diagnosis and treatment are important, according to a report published in the July issue of the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine.

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Active Screening Can Pick Up Cases of Celiac Disease

THURSDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- Active screening for celiac disease can significantly improve the diagnostic rate, according to a report in the July issue of the American Journal of Gastroenterology. The most common complaints include bloating, thyroid disease, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic diarrhea, fatigue and constipation.

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Running Plays Cause Most College, HS Football Injuries

THURSDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- College football players are twice as likely to sustain an injury as high school football players, but high school players are more likely to sustain season-ending injuries, researchers report in the August issue of the American Journal of Sports Medicine.

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Barbed Sutures More Durable Than Conventional Sutures

THURSDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- Polypropylene barbed sutures approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in facelifts are significantly stronger and stiffer than conventional sutures, according to a study in the July issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Obese Friends, Family Boosts Personal Obesity Risk

WEDNESDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- People who have obese siblings, friends or spouses are more likely to become obese themselves, researchers report in the July 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Virus Contributes to Risk of Actinic Keratoses

WEDNESDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- Betapapillomavirus infection, in combination with other known risk factors, raises the risk for actinic keratoses, according to new study findings published in the July issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Vioxx Increases Cardiovascular Events in Cancer Patients

WEDNESDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- Vioxx (rofecoxib), a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, increases the risk of adverse cardiovascular events within two weeks of treatment, according to a report in the July 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The study authors note that the trial was ended early due to withdrawal of Vioxx from the worldwide market.

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Steroid Similar to Placebo for Bronchiolitis in Infants

WEDNESDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- Dexamethasone does not improve rates of hospital admission, respiratory status or later outcomes such as adverse events in infants with moderate-to-severe bronchiolitis compared with placebo, according to the results of a study published in the July 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Some Crohn's Drugs Linked with Risk of Preterm Birth

WEDNESDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- Women with Crohn's disease who take steroids or azathioprine (AZA)/6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) alone or in combination with other drugs during pregnancy may have an increased risk of preterm birth compared to women who take no medication or other medications, according to an analysis of a large Danish registry published in the July issue of the American Journal of Gastroenterology.

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Link Seen Between Low Cholesterol and Cancer

WEDNESDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiac patients who achieve low LDL levels with statin therapy may have a slightly increased risk of cancer, but the cardiovascular benefits of statin therapy still outweigh the risks, according to study findings published in the July 31 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Editorial - LaRosa
Editorial - DeMaria

Lumbar Spondylolisthesis Surgeries Found Effective

WEDNESDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis, anterior lumbar interbody fusion and posterior lumbar interbody fusion are both effective treatments. But patients who receive anterior lumbar interbody fusion may be less likely to develop adjacent-segment degeneration, researchers report in the July issue of the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine.

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Frequent Awakenings During Hypoglycemia in Late Sleep

WEDNESDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- Hormonal changes may explain the frequent awakenings during hypoglycemic episodes in late sleep in people with diabetes, according to a report in the July issue of Diabetes.

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Meta-Analyses Often Contain Data-Extraction Errors

TUESDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- A high percentage of meta-analyses based on standardized mean differences may contain data-extraction errors that negate or even reverse their findings, researchers report in the July 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Hip Protector Ineffective for Nursing Home Residents

TUESDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Among elderly nursing home residents, the use of a hip protector does not reduce the incidence of fracture, according to study findings published in the July 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Nasal Cannula Relieves Sleep Apnea Symptoms

TUESDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- A relatively non-invasive cannula that delivers warm, humidified air to nasal passages can reduce sleep apnea symptoms and may be more acceptable to patients than continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy, according to a report in the July issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. Patient compliance to CPAP is only 50 percent to 60 percent due to side effects such as nasal irritation, claustrophobia and skin breakdown, the authors note.

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Thyroid Function Linked to Death Risk in Cardiac Patients

TUESDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with heart disease, even mild thyroid dysfunction may be associated with an increased risk of death, according to the results of a study published in the July 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Sun Exposure in Childhood May Cut Multiple Sclerosis Risk

MONDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Sun exposure during childhood appears to reduce the risk of developing multiple sclerosis, independent of genetic background, researchers report in the July 24 issue of Neurology.

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Health Literacy Affects Survival in Elderly

MONDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- In older patients, an inability to read and understand basic health information independently predicts an increased five-year risk of all-cause mortality and cardiovascular death, according to research published in the July 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Prophylactic Anticoagulation Reduces Clots, Not Deaths

MONDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Routine prophylactic anticoagulation in hospitalized patients can reduce venous thromboembolic risks compared to placebo, but not mortality, according to study findings published in the July 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Drinking Soda Associated with Metabolic Syndrome

MONDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Consumption of at least one soda per day is associated with a higher risk of metabolic syndrome in middle-aged adults, according to a report published in the July 31 issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Outpatient Blood Clots Present Public Health Challenge

MONDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Outpatients are more likely than inpatients to develop venous thromboembolism, indicating a need for more aggressive anticoagulant prophylaxis, according to a study published in the July 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Residents' Decreased Duty-Hours May Have Downside

MONDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Most internal medicine faculty members believe that decreased resident duty-hours have had adverse effects on both residents and faculty, according to a report published in the July 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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If Child Has Cancer, Parents Often Unprepared for Death

MONDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians can help parents become intellectually and emotionally aware of a child's impending death from cancer, which may decrease the risk of depression, particularly in fathers, according to a report published online July 20 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Taxing Unhealthy Food Could Cut Heart Deaths 1.7 Percent

MONDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- A tax targeting foods containing a combination of unsaturated fat and other unhealthy nutrients could prevent up to 3,200 deaths a year in the United Kingdom, researchers report in the August issue of the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health. The value added tax already targets ice cream, candy, most drinks and some snacks.

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Medical Errors Take Emotional Toll on Physicians

MONDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Serious medical errors and near-misses take an emotional toll on physicians as well as patients, according to a new study in the August issue of the Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.

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FDA Issues Class I Recall of Baxter Infusion Pumps

MONDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Baxter Healthcare Corp. of Round Lake, Ill., notified health care professionals and consumers July 20 of a class I recall of the Baxter Upgraded COLLEAGUE Triple Channel Volumetric Infusion Pumps, model numbers 2M8153, 2M8163, and 2M9163.

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Older Drivers Pose Less Risk Than Younger Drivers

FRIDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Older drivers are less likely to cause a traffic accident than the youngest drivers, but older drivers are more likely to be killed when they are in an accident, according to a RAND Corporation study released July 18.

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Declines in Heart Disease Death in Young Adults Slowing

FRIDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Although the overall mortality rate from coronary heart disease has been falling in Britain since 1984, it appears to be leveling off in adults 35-54 years old, according to a study published online July 19 in the journal Heart.

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Aliskiren Plus Valsartan Controls Blood Pressure

FRIDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Aliskiren and valsartan given together at their maximum recommended doses pack a powerful one-two punch against hypertension, resulting in greater reductions than either drug alone, according to a report in the July 21 issue of The Lancet. However, the combination may also cause potentially life-threatening increases in serum potassium.

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Sitting Devices Can Be Risky for Very Young Infants

FRIDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Infants less than 1 month old may be at higher risk of sudden death when in a sitting device such as a car seat, according to research published online July 19 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Risk of Pneumonia Increases in Lung Patients on Steroids

FRIDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who use inhaled corticosteroids may face an increased risk of developing severe pneumonia and dying from it, according to a new study in the July 15 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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In-Home Palliative Care for Terminally Ill More Satisfying

FRIDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- A palliative care program for homebound terminally ill patients provides more satisfaction for patients and costs less than standard care by reducing emergency room visits and hospitalizations, according to study findings published in the July issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Finasteride Reduces Risk of Premalignant Prostate Lesions

FRIDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term administration of finasteride significantly decreases the risk of high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, according to a report published in the July issue of the Journal of Urology.

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Genetic Variant in Mexicans Affects Cholesterol, Obesity

FRIDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Mexican individuals with the R230C variant of the ATP-binding cassette transporter gene are more likely to have low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and be obese than their counterparts who do not have this variant, according to the results of a new study in the July issue of Diabetes.

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Switching Arthritis Patients to Adalimumab Is Safe, Effective

FRIDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Switching patients with rheumatoid arthritis from infliximab to adalimumab is safe and effective and may reduce costs, researchers report in the July issue of Rheumatology.

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System Improves End-of-Life Care for Seriously Ill

THURSDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- An electronic record system increases the use of advance directives for the care of seriously ill individuals, including do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders and limitation of other life-sustaining treatments, according to a report in the July issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Dairy Intake Linked to Lower Metabolic Syndrome Risk

THURSDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- Daily consumption of milk and other dairy products by middle-aged men is associated with a lower risk of metabolic syndrome, according to study findings published in the July issue of the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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System Cuts Inappropriate Drug Dispensing to Elderly

THURSDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- A computerized system that alerts pharmacists when elderly individuals are prescribed potentially inappropriate medications reduces the dispensing of such medications, according to a report in the July issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Prostate Cancer Patients May Not Need Digital Rectal Exam

THURSDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- In men who undergo radical treatment for prostate cancer, routine digital rectal examination is usually not necessary because prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests can reliably identify disease recurrence, according to a report published in the July issue of the Journal of Urology.

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HIV Patients Can Achieve Normal CD4 Cell Counts

THURSDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- In most HIV-positive patients, long-term combination antiretroviral therapy that suppresses HIV viral load to below 50 copies per milliliter may restore CD4 cell counts to levels found in HIV-negative subjects, according to study findings published online July 19 in The Lancet.

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Many Teen Elite Tennis Players Have Spinal Abnormalities

THURSDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- Most young elite tennis players with no symptoms of pain have abnormalities in their lower spine including fractures and degenerated discs, according to a report published online July 19 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

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Gene Variant Associated with Restless Legs Syndrome

WEDNESDAY, July 18 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have identified a gene variant strongly associated with periodic limb movements in sleep and restless legs syndrome, according to a report published online July 18 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Drug Combo Boosts Risk in Peripheral Arterial Disease

WEDNESDAY, July 18 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with peripheral arterial disease who take an oral anticoagulant in combination with an antiplatelet drug do not benefit in terms of cardiovascular events and are more likely to experience life-threatening bleeding, including hemorrhagic stroke, than patients on antiplatelet therapy alone. The findings are published in the July 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Modified Antibody Effective in Treating Crohn's Disease

WEDNESDAY, July 18 (HealthDay News) -- The experimental drug certolizumab pegol, a pegylated antibody fragment that binds tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), is more effective than placebo in treating patients with Crohn's disease, according to two studies in the July 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Human Papillomavirus More Prevalent in Poor Women

WEDNESDAY, July 18 (HealthDay News) -- Compared with women with more resources, low-income American women are at higher risk for human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, researchers report in the July issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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No Interaction Seen Between Clopidogrel and Statins

WEDNESDAY, July 18 (HealthDay News) -- Contrary to concerns that certain statins may reduce the effectiveness of clopidogrel because both are metabolized by CYP3A4, there is no evidence that the drugs interact, according to a report in the July 24 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Non-Fasting Triglyceride Levels Predict Cardiac Events

TUESDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- Elevated non-fasting triglyceride levels are a risk factor for coronary heart disease, according to two reports published in the July 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract -- Nordestgaard
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Abstract -- Ridker
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Editorial

PSA Can Be Elevated in Prostate Cancer-Free Men

TUESDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- About one in five men with no clinical evidence of prostate cancer have levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) above 2.5 ng/mL and half have a percentage free/total PSA that is less than 25 percent, according to the results of a study in the July issue of the British Journal of Urology.

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Smokers with Diabetes May Receive Suboptimal Care

TUESDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetic smokers are less likely to receive recommended diabetes care, including foot exams, hemoglobin A1C tests and eye exams, when compared with their non-smoking counterparts, according to a study in the July issue of Diabetes Care.

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Loss of Taste Unlikely After Tonsillectomy

TUESDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- Contrary to some published reports, patients are unlikely to have an impaired sense of taste following tonsillectomy, according to the results of a small study published in the July issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology--Head & Neck Surgery.

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Gonorrhea Increasingly Resistant to Fluoroquinolone

TUESDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- Resistance of gonorrhea to treatment with fluoroquinolone is increasing in the United States, and ongoing monitoring of efficacy of treatment is required, according to study findings published online July 17 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Diabetic Trauma Patients at Greater Risk of Complications

TUESDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients hospitalized for trauma, those with diabetes mellitus are significantly more likely than non-diabetics to develop complications and require a higher level of care, which increases the cost of their hospitalization, according to study findings published in the July issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Chlamydia Rates Warrant Screening Young Women

TUESDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of chlamydia in the United States is 2.2 percent, compared with just 0.24 percent for gonorrhea, and warrants screening of sexually active young women, according to a report published in the July 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Prevalence, Severity of C. Difficile Colitis Increasing

TUESDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence, total mortality rate and colectomy rate of Clostridium difficile colitis has dramatically increased in the United States since 1993, according to a report in the July issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Older Diabetes Drugs As Good and Cheaper Than New Ones

TUESDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- The first comprehensive review of literature on the relative benefits of oral diabetes drugs, published online July 17 in the Annals of Internal Medicine, concludes that older drugs are just as effective and sometimes better than new drugs for a lower price. The research was conducted by the Johns Hopkins Evidence-based Practice Center in Rockville, Md., under contract from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

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AHA Endorses Resistance Training for Heart Patients

MONDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- Under proper supervision, most heart patients can safely add resistance training to an exercise program and it may have significant long-term beneficial effects on their cardiovascular and overall health, according to an American Heart Association scientific statement published in the July 31 issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Living Near Major Roads May Speed Atherosclerosis

MONDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- People who live near heavily traveled roads are exposed to high amounts of pollution, which may accelerate the development and progression of atherosclerosis, researchers report in the July 31 issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Insulin-Like Growth Factor Helps Regulate Bone Growth

MONDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- The growth factor insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is a major regulator of bone growth by regulating epiphyseal chondrocyte growth, with some cell types more sensitive to IGF-I than others, according to study findings published in the July issue of Endocrinology.

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Narcolepsy Patients More Likely to Have REM Without Atonia

FRIDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- Narcolepsy patients are more likely to have REM sleep without atonia than controls, and tend to have sleep motor abnormalities similar to patients with idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder. Patients with the conditions may have neurobiological defects in motor inhibition, according to a report in the July issue of Sleep.

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Tobacco Use Associated with Reduced Parkinson's Risk

FRIDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- A history of tobacco use is indeed associated with a significantly reduced risk of Parkinson disease, according to the first pooled analysis of data. The results, published in the July issue of the Archives of Neurology, suggest that there is a risk reduction in ex-smokers as well as in pipe and cigar smokers.

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Post-Radiation Therapy Skin Lesions Difficult to Diagnose

FRIDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- In breast cancer patients who undergo postoperative radiation therapy and develop vascular proliferations in mammary skin, there may be a significant overlap between atypical vascular lesions and angiosarcoma, according to a report published in the July issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Risk of HIV with Condom Same with or Without Diaphragm

FRIDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- The use of a diaphragm and lubricant gel in addition to a condom is not more effective at reducing the risk for HIV infection in women from South Africa and Zimbabwe than using a condom alone, according to a report published online July 13 in The Lancet.

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Higher Costs for Uninsured After Enrolling in Medicare

FRIDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals who lack health insurance before becoming eligible for Medicare and who have cardiovascular disease or diabetes have more visits to the doctor, hospitalizations and health care costs after enrolling in Medicare than previously insured individuals, according to a report in the July 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Serotonin Transporter Variants Linked to Drug Effects

FRIDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- Certain variants of a serotonin transporter gene are associated with a higher burden of adverse effects in depressed patients being treated with citalopram, researchers report in the July issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Skin Denervation Common in Eosinophilia Neuropathy

FRIDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with eosinophilia-associated neuropathy frequently have skin denervation and cutaneous vasculitis, according to study findings published in the July issue of the Archives of Neurology.

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Temporal Scanning Inaccurate for Body Temperature

THURSDAY, July 12 (HealthDay News) -- Temporal scanning thermometry, which tracks internal body temperature by detecting the highest forehead skin temperature by infrared scanning, does not accurately detect increases in internal body temperature after heat stress, researchers report in the July issue of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.

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Bird Exposure Linked to Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis

THURSDAY, July 12 (HealthDay News) -- Common causes of hypersensitivity pneumonitis include exposure to birds and exposure to bird contaminated hot-tub water, according to study findings published in the July issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Performance-Related Pay Works Best with Quality Focus

THURSDAY, July 12 (HealthDay News) -- In pediatric care, pay-for-performance programs work best if they are combined with other collaborative efforts to improve the quality of care, according to the results of a study published in the July issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Selenium Supplementation May Increase Diabetes Risk

THURSDAY, July 12 (HealthDay News) -- Selenium supplementation in cases of already adequate dietary selenium intake increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online July 10 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Onsite Dietician Counseling Benefits Overweight Patients

THURSDAY, July 12 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who consult with a dietician during regular doctor visits may experience sustained improvements in body weight, lipid levels and blood pressure, according to the results of a study published in the July issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Varenicline Curbs Ethanol Seeking, Consumption in Rats

THURSDAY, June 12 (HealthDay News) -- The recently approved anti-smoking drug varenicline (Chantix) may also reduce dependence on alcohol, according to the results of a study in rats published online July 11 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.

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Visual Impairment Often Neglected in Nursing Home

THURSDAY, July 12 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of nursing home residents may have serious visual impairments and as many as two-thirds of them aren't receiving eye examinations, according to study findings published in the July issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Parents' Views Vary on Age Children Achieve Independence

THURSDAY, July 12 (HealthDay News) -- Parents' views on when a child can bathe alone, cross the street and ride a bike unsupervised vary widely, researchers report in the July issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Video Games Cut Into Homework, Reading Time

THURSDAY, July 12 (HealthDay News) -- A study of video game play among adolescents suggests that while gaming may not affect social interactions with family and friends, gamers tend to spend 30 percent less time reading and doing homework than non-gamers, researchers report in the July issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Jogger with iPod Suffers Indirect Lightening Strike

WEDNESDAY, July 11 (HealthDay News) -- Jogging in a thunderstorm with an iPod and being indirectly struck by lightning led to burns, hearing loss and fractures in a case reported in the July 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Shorter Treatment Less Effective for Some Types of Hepatitis C

WEDNESDAY, July 11 (HealthDay News) -- Patients infected with certain genotypes of hepatitis C virus (HCV) have a higher sustained virologic response to treatment with peginterferon and ribavirin when they are treated for the standard 24 weeks rather than 16 weeks, according to the results of a study in the July 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Diet Linked to Respiratory Function in Adolescents

WEDNESDAY, July 11 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents with low dietary intake of fruit and certain fatty acids are at higher risk of poor respiratory function, researchers report in the July issue of Chest.

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Healthline Operators Steer Stroke Patients Wrong Way

WEDNESDAY, July 11 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital healthline operators may inappropriately advise stroke patients to call their doctors instead of 911, leading to delays in life-saving and brain-saving stroke treatment, according to study findings published in the August issue of Stroke.

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Urban Teens' Weight, Activity Levels Affect Insulin

WEDNESDAY, July 11 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight status or low levels of physical activity correlate well with decreased insulin sensitivity and elevated insulin secretion in a population of urban black teens, according to a report in the July issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Visual Impairment Associated with Higher Mortality Risk

WEDNESDAY, July 11 (HealthDay News) -- Patients aged 49 to 74 with age-related macular degeneration and patients who are 49 and older with cataracts have a greater risk of mortality than those without the ophthalmic conditions, according to a report in the July issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Gender-Neutral System Classifies Pattern Baldness

WEDNESDAY, July 11 (HealthDay News) -- A new way of classifying pattern hair loss could replace separate systems for men and women with an accurate, gender-neutral universal classification system, researchers report in the July issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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FDA Review Suggests Lycopene Doesn't Cut Cancer Risk

WEDNESDAY, July 11 (HealthDay News) -- Scientific studies do not support the claim that tomato and/or lycopene consumption reduces the overall risk of cancer, according to a U.S. Food and Drug Administration evidence-based review published in the July 18 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. However, very limited evidence suggests that there may be an association between tomato consumption and a reduced risk of certain types of cancer, including prostate, ovarian, gastric and pancreatic cancer.

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First Ischemic Event Affects Subsequent Renal Function

TUESDAY, July 10 (HealthDay News) -- A first myocardial ischemic event may accelerate the natural decline in renal function, with myocardial infarction patients experiencing a more rapid drop in renal function than other patients, according to a report in the July issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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High Intensity Walking Improves Blood Pressure

TUESDAY, July 10 (HealthDay News) -- Healthy older adults who incorporate some high intensity into their walking program can significantly improve muscle strength and reduce blood pressure, according to the results of a study published in the July issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Herbal Remedies for Insomnia More Common Than Thought

TUESDAY, July 10 (HealthDay News) -- The popular use of supplements such as valerian and melatonin for insomnia and other ailments is growing, along with concerns of possible adverse drug interactions, according to study findings published in the July 1 issue of Sleep.

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Start of Parkinson's Therapy Linked to Hallucinations

TUESDAY, July 10 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with early Parkinson disease may have an increased risk of developing hallucinations, sleepiness and edema when they start dopaminergic treatment, researchers report in the July 10 issue of Neurology.

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Gene Mutation Linked to Frontotemporal Dementia

TUESDAY, July 10 (HealthDay News) -- The development of frontotemporal dementia is associated with a newly discovered genetic mutation, according to a study of one family published in the July 10 issue of Neurology.

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Magazine's Ranking Omits Some Top Heart Hospitals

MONDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. News & World Report rankings of "America's Best Hospitals for Heart and Heart Surgery" fall short in identifying all the top hospitals for heart attack patients, researchers report in the July 9 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Inappropriate PSA Screening Common in VA Hospitals

MONDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- Many physicians do not follow evidence-based guidelines for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening, according to a report in the July 9 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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FDA Approves Exelon Skin Patch for Alzheimer Disease

MONDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a once-daily Exelon skin patch (rivastigmine transdermal system) for the treatment of mild to moderate Alzheimer disease. The cholinesterase inhibitor, made by Novartis AG, was approved in capsule form last year.

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Benzodiazepine Binding Sites Decreased in Panic Disorder

MONDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with panic disorder have a decrease in benzodiazepine binding sites in the insular cortex compared to those without the psychiatric diagnosis, according to a brain imaging study published in the July issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Higher Cabin Pressure May Cut Air Travel Discomfort

MONDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- Barometric pressures experienced during commercial air travel are insufficient to induce acute mountain sickness but still cause a significant amount of discomfort in unacclimatized passengers, researchers report in the July 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. Increasing cabin pressure may help reduce this discomfort, the authors suggest.

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Many Adults Don't Change Behavior in Heat Waves

FRIDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- While most adults are aware of heat warnings, few change their behavior or know how to take precautions during heat waves, according to a report in the July issue of the International Journal of Biometeorology. The media, health departments and others have done a poor job in educating the public about how to reduce their risk of illness and death during heat waves, the report indicates.

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Insomnia Associated with Increased Anxiety Risk

FRIDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic insomnia is associated with a greater risk of developing anxiety disorders and depression over time, according to the results of a population-based study published in the July issue of Sleep.

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New Equipment Cuts Illnesses at Child Care Centers

FRIDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- Installing high-quality hand-washing and other equipment designed to halt the spread of infectious agents can reduce episodes of illness in children and staff at child care centers, researchers report in the July issue of Pediatrics.

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Nearly One in Five U.S. Adults Has Had Alcohol Problem

FRIDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- Alcohol abuse and dependence have affected nearly one in five people in the United States at some point in their life, yet less than one-quarter of problem drinkers have ever received treatment, according to a study published in the July issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Decline in Sense of Smell Precedes Mental Decline

FRIDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- In older adults, impaired ability to identify odors may be the harbinger of future mild cognitive impairment that is frequently a precursor to Alzheimer disease, according to the results of a study published in the July issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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FDA Approves Generic Versions of Lamisil

FRIDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted approval to several manufacturers to produce generic versions of Lamisil (terbinafine hydrochloride), a prescription drug sold in tablet form to treat nail fungus infections and as an over-the-counter cream to treat athlete's foot. The patent for Lamisil expired on June 30.

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Epilepsy Patients Have Increased Risk of Suicide

FRIDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who have epilepsy and a history of psychiatric disease are 13 times more likely to commit suicide than control individuals with neither epilepsy nor psychiatric disease, according to a report published online July 3 in The Lancet Neurology. Women and recently diagnosed patients may be at particularly high risk.

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Merck Recalls Three Lots of Invanz Due to Glass Shards

FRIDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- Three lots of Invanz (ertapenem sodium) were recalled this week due to two incidents in which pieces of broken glass were found in the reconstituted solution for injection. Merck & Co., Inc., of Whitehouse Station, N.J., issued a letter to health care professionals noting that it is working closely with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to inform its direct customers of the recall.

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Pet Turtle Linked to Infant's Death

FRIDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- Small pet turtles sold in the United States are associated with a risk of salmonellosis in children, and may have caused an infant's death earlier this year, according to a report in the July 6 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Their sale is banned by federal law in the United States, but sales still occur.

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Von Hippel-Lindau Disease Linked to Hearing Loss

THURSDAY, July 5 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease, irreversible sensorineural hearing loss associated with endolymphatic sac tumors may occur suddenly or gradually, suggesting a need for early intervention, according to a study published in the July 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Dark Chocolate Intake May Reduce Blood Pressure

THURSDAY, July 5 (HealthDay News) -- Daily consumption of a small amount of dark chocolate may benefit patients with above-optimal blood pressure, according to the results of a randomized trial published in the July 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Some Children Get Hooked on Tobacco Within Two Days

THURSDAY, July 5 (HealthDay News) -- Vulnerable sixth-graders can lose control over tobacco just one or two days after inhaling their first cigarette, researchers report in the July issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Children with Cerebral Palsy Have Regular Quality of Life

THURSDAY, July 5 (HealthDay News) -- Children aged 8 to 12 years with cerebral palsy have a quality of life that is similar to that of their peers in the general population, according to a study published in the June 30 issue of The Lancet.

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Conflict Does Not Fuel Spread of HIV

THURSDAY, July 5 (HealthDay News) -- Although it has been suggested that HIV incidence is increased by conflict and the widespread rape and population displacement that accompanies it, populations affected by war do not have a greater incidence of HIV infection than those not affected by war, according to a report published in the June 30 issue of The Lancet.

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Two Doses of Varicella Vaccine Now Recommended

THURSDAY, July 5 (HealthDay News) -- All children aged 12 months and older should receive two doses of varicella vaccine, a strategy that should lead to higher levels of immunity, protect against breakthrough disease and reduce the number of outbreaks in school-aged populations, according to new recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics published in the July issue of Pediatrics.

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High Serum Myeloperoxidase May Predict Heart Disease

THURSDAY, July 5 (HealthDay News) -- High serum levels of myeloperoxidase -- an inflammatory protein that damages the cardiovascular system -- may predict the development of coronary artery disease in apparently healthy patients, according to the results of a study published in the July 10 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Depression Treatment Reduces Suicide Risk in Teens, Adults

THURSDAY, July 5 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with depression, the risk of suicide attempts significantly decreases after the initiation of antidepressant treatment, psychotherapy or both, according to study findings published in the July issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry.

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New Hepatitis A Vaccination Guidelines Issued

THURSDAY, July 5 (HealthDay News) -- All children aged 12-23 months in all 50 states should receive a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-licensed hepatitis A vaccine, according to new American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations published in the July issue of Pediatrics.

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Feeding-Related Neuropeptide Promotes Visceral Fat Growth

THURSDAY, July 5 (HealthDay News) -- Neuropeptide Y, a hormone involved in the neural control of feeding, may also be linked to stress-induced obesity, according to a report in the July issue of Nature Medicine.

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Novel Therapy for Stress Incontinence

THURSDAY, July 5 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with stress urinary incontinence, injections of autologous myoblasts and fibroblasts may reverse the condition, according to the results of a study published in the June 30 issue of The Lancet.

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Finasteride Has Minimal Impact on Sexual Function

WEDNESDAY, July 4 (HealthDay News) -- The prostate cancer prevention drug finasteride has only a minor impact on sexual function and the effect diminishes over time, according to study findings published in the July 4 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Reluctant to Switch Therapies

WEDNESDAY, July 4 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with rheumatoid arthritis are reluctant to change their current therapy, even if it's not working, largely because of fear of losing control of their disease or the potential for side effects, researchers report in the July issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Some Studies of Glucosamine May Overstate Effects

WEDNESDAY, July 4 (HealthDay News) -- Trial results on glucosamine hydrochloride differ widely because the drug is not effective for osteoarthritis of the hip and knee, with industry-sponsored researched overstating the effects, according to a report published in the July issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism. But an accompanying editorial points out some potential problems with the investigation and advises caution with interpretation.

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Adolescents on List for Meningococcal Vaccination

TUESDAY, July 3 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices has voted to expand the range of recipients for meningococcal disease vaccination to include all adolescents aged 11 to 18 years.

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Protein May Be Marker for Coronary Artery Disease in Men

TUESDAY, July 3 (HealthDay News) -- Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, a protein involved in immune recognition of pathogens, may be an independent predictor of coronary artery disease in men, researchers report in the July 3 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Some Naturopathic Physicians Provide Pediatric Care

TUESDAY, July 3 (HealthDay News) -- Some naturopathic physicians, who treat the whole person by natural means including nutrition and exercise, provide substantial amounts of pediatric care, according to a report in the July issue of Pediatrics.

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Immune Response Greater in Blacks with Multiple Sclerosis

TUESDAY, July 3 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with multiple sclerosis, blacks have a higher cerebrospinal fluid humoral immune response than whites, according to the results of a study published in the July 3 issue of Neurology.

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Liquid-Based Cytology Detects More Cervical Cancer

TUESDAY, July 3 (HealthDay News) -- Liquid-based cytology detects more cervical cancers than conventional cytology in Pap smears and also reduces the percentage of unsatisfactory smears, according to the results of two studies published online June 29 in BMJ.

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Spermicidal May Raise Risk for Sexually Transmitted Disease

TUESDAY, July 3 (HealthDay News) -- The commonly used vaginal spermicide, nonoxynol-9, may facilitate human papillomavirus (HPV) infection while vaginal lubricants containing the polysaccharide carrageenan may help prevent infection, according to the results of a study in mice published in the July issue of Nature Medicine.

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Web-Based Infectious Disease Tracking System Launched

TUESDAY, July 3 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has launched the National Healthcare Safety Network, a secure, Web-based infectious disease tracking system that is accessible to all health care facilities in the United States. The system enables data analysis and information sharing within and between facilities, with the option for institutions to make information available to the public.

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Off-Road Motorized Vehicle Injuries Rising Among Children

TUESDAY, July 3 (HealthDay News) -- The annual number of injuries involving children using non-automobile motorized vehicles nearly doubled between 1990 and 2003, with almost half due to all-terrain vehicles, according to study findings published in the July issue of Pediatrics.

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Universal Tuberculosis Screening Not Cost Effective

TUESDAY, July 3 (HealthDay News) -- Both universal screening and targeted tuberculin skin testing of kindergartners to prevent tuberculosis are not cost-effective unless the prevalence of positive tuberculin skin tests is high, according to a study in the July issue of Pediatrics.

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Health Courts a Promising Model for Malpractice Suits

TUESDAY, July 3 (HealthDay News) -- The American Medical Association has backed the idea of health courts for states without caps on claims for medical malpractice, stating that they are an option that deserves greater exploration. This information was released by the AMA on June 26.

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Probiotic Drink Reduces Antibiotic-Related Diarrhea

TUESDAY, July 3 (HealthDay News) -- Among elderly people being treated with antibiotics, those given a probiotic beverage may be less prone to diarrhea, according to a report published online June 29 in BMJ.

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Impaired Lung Function Linked to Systemic Inflammation

MONDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- In young adults, reduced lung capacity is independently associated with a high level of systemic inflammation, which could increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, according to a report published online June 29 in Thorax.

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Low Household Income Linked to Migraine Risk in Teens

MONDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents in low-income households have a higher risk of migraine than those in upper-income households, but only if there is no parental history of migraine, according to a study published in the July 3 issue of Neurology.

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Human Bite Wounds Pose Management Challenge

MONDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency departments find human bite wounds difficult to manage, according to a report published in the July Issue of the Emergency Medicine Journal.

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Papworth Method Benefits Adults with Mild Asthma

MONDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- The Papworth method -- a series of integrated breathing and relaxation exercises developed in the 1960s -- may help improve symptoms, dysfunctional breathing and mood in adults with mild asthma, according to study findings published online June 29 in Thorax.

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Climate Change Likely to Increase Mortality Rates

MONDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- Hotter summer temperatures associated with global warming are likely to increase mortality rates, according to the results of a study published online June 28 in Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

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High Sperm Abnormalities in Lupus Patients

MONDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- Males with systemic lupus erythematosus have a high frequency of sperm abnormalities that may be associated with early cyclophosphamide treatment, researchers report in the July issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Psychotherapy Improves Survival from Cancer

MONDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- Including inpatient psychotherapeutic support for patients undergoing surgery for gastrointestinal cancer has a significant benefit on long-term survival, researchers report in the July 1 edition of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Suicide Twice as High in Male Veterans Versus Non-Vets

MONDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- Male veterans are twice as likely to commit suicide as non-veterans, whether or not they are affiliated with the Department of Veterans Affairs, according to a report in the July issue of the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Plasma Testosterone Linked to Recurrent Cancer in Women

MONDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal women with surgically removed but otherwise untreated breast cancer are likely to have a poorer outcome if they are found to have high levels of testosterone, according to study results published in the July 1 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Glycemic Load Can Increase Risk of Heart Disease

MONDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- High dietary glycemic load increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, according to a report in the July 3 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Adult Atopy Intensified by Cat Allergen

MONDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- Having a cat in the house can exacerbate bronchial responsiveness of adults with asthma or allergies even if the person tests negative for sensitivity to feline allergen, according to a study published in the July 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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