July 2011 Briefing - Family Practice

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for July 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Intensive Glycemic Control Does Not Improve Renal Outcome

FRIDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- In older patients with type 2 diabetes, intensive glycemic control does not improve renal disease progression, but it is associated with reduction in nephropathy progression in patients with worse microvascular eye disease, higher body mass index (BMI), and lower diastolic blood pressure (DBP), according to a study published online July 20 in Diabetes Care.

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Testosterone Ranges Set Up for Premenopausal Women

FRIDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Using validated immunoassays, reference ranges for free, total, and bioavailable testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) have been established using the fifth and 95th percentiles in premenopausal women with normal menstrual cycles, according to a study published online July 19 in The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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Youth Exposure to Farms Tied to Adult Hematological Cancer

FRIDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Growing up on a livestock farm, particularly a poultry farm, but not a crop farm, is associated with an increased risk of hematological cancer in adulthood, according to a study published online July 27 in Occupational & Environmental Medicine.

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Metabolic Syndrome Increases Primary Liver Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Metabolic syndrome is a significant risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC), regardless of other major risk factors for HCC and ICC, according to a study published in the August issue of Hepatology.

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Mammography Screening Has Low Impact on Mortality

FRIDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Despite a 10 to 15 year difference in the implementation of mammography screening, paired European countries with similar socioeconomic status and access to treatment had comparable breast cancer mortality after 1989, according to a study published online July 28 in BMJ.

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Evidence Shows Early Weight Gain Tied to Large Body Size

FRIDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Large body size in children between the ages of 5 and 6 months, and weight gain during the first two years of life have a positive association with larger body size at the ages of 5 to 13 years, according to a review published in the August issue of Obesity Reviews.

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CDC: U.S. Cholera Cases Linked to Hispaniola Epidemic

FRIDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- In the United States, cholera cases caused by toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 are linked to travel to Hispaniola and consumption of seafood from Haiti, according to a report published online July 21 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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Baroreflex Activation Therapy Tied to Safe SBP Reduction

FRIDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Baroreflex activation therapy (BAT) can safely reduce systolic blood pressure (SBP) over the long term in patients with resistant hypertension, according to a study published online July 28 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Pregnancy-Related Stroke Hospitalizations Rise in the U.S.

THURSDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of pregnancy-related hospitalizations for stroke have increased in the United States, especially during the postpartum period, from 1994-1995 to 2006-2007, mainly due to changes in prevalence of hypertension and heart disease, according to a study published online July 28 in Stroke.

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More Weight Loss in Bariatric Surgery Than Standard Care

THURSDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Bariatric surgery appears to have substantially higher efficacy than standard care for reducing weight in severely obese adults, according to a review published in the August issue of Obesity Reviews.

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Increase in Gout Prevalence From 1988 to 2008

THURSDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of gout and hyperuricemia in the United States is considerable and has increased over the past two decades, according to a study published online July 28 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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CDC: Nonfatal Sports and Recreation Heat Illness Studied

THURSDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals who take part in unstructured sports and recreational activities, especially during the summer months, may be at an increased risk of heat illness, according to a report in the July 29 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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CDC: HIV-2 Infections in the U.S. Rarely Identified

THURSDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- HIV-2 infections in the United States appear to be rare and concentrated in the Northeast, mainly limited to individuals born in West Africa, according to a report in the July 29 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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High Prenatal Milk Intake Tied to Lower Offspring MS Risk

THURSDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Higher milk and vitamin D consumption during pregnancy is associated with a reduced risk of adult-onset multiple sclerosis (MS) in offspring, according to a study published online July 22 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Coronary Events Are More Heritable Than Cerebral Events

THURSDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Coronary events are more heritable than cerebral events, with myocardial infarction (MI) significantly more likely than stroke to cluster in families, according to a study published online July 26 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics.

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VTE Rates Post Knee Arthroplasty Increased '97-'07

THURSDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of venous thromboembolism following knee arthroplasty has increased from 1997 to 2007, with a higher risk among patients with a history of cardiovascular disease or a prior venous thromboembolism, according to a study published in the July 20 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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HbA1c Identifies Diabetes, Prediabetes in Acute Care

THURSDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measurements can be used as a reliable screen for undiagnosed diabetes, prediabetes, and dysglycemia in emergency settings, according to a study published online July 20 in Diabetes Care.

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Hepatitis B and C Prevalent in Injecting Drug Users

THURSDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigens (HBsAg) are common in injecting drug users (IDUs), with an estimated 10.0 million IDUs positive for HCV and 1.2 million for HBsAg, according to a review published online July 28 in The Lancet.

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Rotavirus Infection Gives Lower Protection in India

WEDNESDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Rotavirus infection in India tends to occur early in life, has higher reinfection rates, and lower rates of protection against subsequent infection episodes than reported elsewhere, according to a study published in the July 28 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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CDH13 Linked to Lowered Levels of Adiponectin

WEDNESDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the T-cadherin (CDH13) gene is associated with lowered adiponectin levels and an increased risk of cardiometabolic diseases, according to a study published online July 19 in Diabetes.

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Limited Positive Effect of Restaurant Calorie Labeling

WEDNESDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S regulation requiring fast food restaurants to add calorie labeling has not impacted the mean calories purchased at lunchtime, but some major chains have seen significant reductions, and 15 percent of customers use the information and purchase fewer calories, according to a study published online July 26 in BMJ.

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Parental Deployment Tied to Impaired Adolescent Well-Being

WEDNESDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Parental military service impairs parameters of adolescent well-being, particularly for boys, according to a study published online July 21 in the American Journal of Public Health.

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Intensive Glucose Lowering Offers No Benefit on Mortality

WEDNESDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Intensive glucose-lowering treatment shows no significant reduction in all-cause mortality or deaths from cardiovascular causes in adults with type 2 diabetes, according to a meta-analysis published online July 26 in BMJ.

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Child's Cognitive Outcome Not Tied to Pregnancy Planning

WEDNESDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Pre-pregnancy planning, subfertility, and assisted reproduction have no adverse effect on a child's cognitive development at ages 3 or 5, and the differences in cognition seen in unadjusted analysis can mainly be explained by socioeconomic confounders, according to a study published online July 26 in BMJ.

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Women Should Be Screened for Alcohol Abuse at Least Annually

WEDNESDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Obstetrician-gynecologists should screen and counsel women at risk of drinking and alcohol dependence, especially those who are pregnant or at risk of pregnancy; and health care providers should routinely screen all women for history of sexual assault, according to two Practice Bulletins from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists published in the August issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Vascular Changes Contribute to Dementia in Older People

WEDNESDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Vascular changes contribute to age-related vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) and dementia, according to a new American Heart Association/American Stroke Association scientific statement published online July 21 in Stroke.

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Smoking Tied to Increase in Post-Arthroplasty Complications

WEDNESDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Pre-operative smoking status is a significant predictor of 30-day postoperative complications and mortality at one year in patients undergoing elective primary total knee replacement or primary total hip replacement surgery (TKR/THR), according to a study published online July 18 in Arthritis Care & Research.

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FDA: Methylene Blue and Linezolid Tied to CNS Reactions

TUESDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has notified health care professionals and patients that individuals taking certain psychiatric medications may be at a higher risk of serious central nervous system (CNS) reactions when given reversible monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), including methylene blue or linezolid (Zyvox).

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Medicare Part D Tied to Lower Nondrug Medical Spending

TUESDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of Medicare Part D has significantly reduced the nondrug medical spending for Medicare beneficiaries with limited prior drug coverage, according to a study published in the July 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Stable Rate of Chronic Conditions for Children Born at <1 kg

TUESDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- The overall rate of chronic conditions and asthma in children born weighing less than 1 kg (extremely low-birth-weight [ELBW] children) remains stable between the ages of 8 and 14 years, but obesity increases compared to normal-birth-weight (NBW) children; so that, at age 14, the rates of chronic conditions are higher in ELBW children, but asthma and obesity are similar, according to a study published in the July 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Better UTI Prevention With TMP-SMX Than Cranberries

TUESDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) treatment is more effective than cranberries in preventing recurrent urinary tract infections (rUTIs) among premenopausal women, according to a study published in the July 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Breast-Feeding Tied to Child's Risk of Asthma Symptoms

TUESDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- Compared to exclusive breast-feeding and breast-feeding for six months, non-exclusive breast-feeding or never breast-feeding is associated with an increased risk of asthma-related symptoms in children during the first four years of their life, with the strongest association occurring in the first two years, according to a study published online July 20 in the European Respiratory Journal.

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Crossing Environment Tied to Pedestrian Injury Rates in ADHD

TUESDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder combined type (ADHD-C) show appropriate pedestrian behavior on the curb but choose riskier pedestrian environments to cross the street, according to a study published online July 25 in Pediatrics.

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Higher BMI Predicts Clinical Decompensation in Cirrhosis

TUESDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- Higher body mass index (BMI) is a significant predictor of clinical decompensation (CD) in patients with compensated cirrhosis, independent of other previously described predictors and treatment groups, according to a study published online June 26 in Hepatology.

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Foods Prepared Away From Home Tied to Child's Energy Intake

TUESDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- An increase in children's total daily energy intake from 1977 to 2006 correlated with a major shift toward increased energy from foods consumed or prepared away from home, according to a study published online July 25 in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

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Propranolol Safe and Effective for Infantile Hemangiomas

TUESDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with propranolol reduces the volume, color, and elevation of infantile hemangiomas (IHs), according to a study published online July 25 in Pediatrics.

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Dual Metabolic Defects Tied to Hypertriglyceridemia in Obese

MONDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- Hypertriglyceridemia in obese men can be attributed to dual metabolic defects of increased secretion and impaired clearance of triglyceride-rich very-low-density lipoprotein1 (VLDL1), according to a study published online July 21 in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

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Non-Receipt of Fluids in Children Tied to Increased Oligoanuria

MONDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- Young patients with pre-hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) diarrhea, who do not receive intravenous fluids within the first four days of diarrhea onset, have increased risk of developing oligoanuria, according to a study published online July 22 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Specific Child Health Care Needs Tied to Poor School Outcomes

MONDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- Specific subgroups of children with special health care needs due to functional limitations or behavioral health problems are at higher risk of poor outcomes at school, including lower academic achievement, according to a study published online July 25 in Pediatrics.

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FDA: Chantix Tied to Slight Risk of Cardiac Events

MONDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration notified health care professionals and patients that the drug label for varenicline (Chantix) was updated to include information about the effectiveness and safety of the drug when used in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or cardiovascular disease.

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Too Few Docs Refer High-Risk Women for Genetic Testing

MONDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- Most U.S. physicians adhere to recommendations against genetic counseling and testing for women at average risk of ovarian cancer, but less than half adhere to guidelines for referral for high-risk women, according to a study published online July 25 in Cancer.

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Personality Traits Predict BMI Changes Across Adulthood

MONDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- Certain personality traits are predictors for changes in body mass index (BMI) across adulthood, but changes in those traits are mainly unrelated to BMI changes, according to a study published online July 11 in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.

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Meta-Analysis Shows 8 SNPs Tied to Metabolic Syndrome

MONDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- Eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS), mostly located in genes involved in dyslipidemia, according to a meta-analysis published online July 12 in Obesity Reviews.

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High Mortality Decline With One-Dose Varicella Vaccine

MONDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- Overall varicella mortality decreased by 88 percent following implementation of the one-dose vaccination program, with a 96 percent decrease in individuals aged younger than 50 years, according to a study published online July 25 in Pediatrics.

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Skin Self-Exam Increases Transiently With DVD Use

FRIDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Targeted interventions increase the proportion of men 50 years and older conducting skin self-examination (SSE), but additional DVD or video-based intervention shows no benefit over written material at 13 months, according to a study published in the July issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Prenatal Nicotine Exposure Tied to Vascular Dysfunction

FRIDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal nicotine exposure in rats can increase the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulting in vascular hypertensive reactivity in male offspring, according to an experimental study published online July 21 in the British Journal of Pharmacology.

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FDA: Dronedarone Tied to Cardiovascular Events, Death

FRIDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has notified health care professionals and patients that dronedarone (Multaq) may be associated with an increased risk of death and adverse cardiovascular events, including stroke and hospitalization for heart failure.

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Being Married Linked to Earlier Care After Chest Pain

FRIDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Though married status is associated with lower odds of delayed medical care after chest pain, married men are significantly more likely to present earlier for care after myocardial infarction (MI) with chest pain, but married women show no such benefit, according to a study published online July 18 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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FDA: Possible Bisphosphonate-Esophageal CA Link Reviewed

FRIDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has notified health care professionals and patients that the use of oral bisphosphonates does not appear to increase the risk of esophageal cancer, with the agency currently not recommending endoscopic screening of asymptomatic patients.

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CDC: Sexual Transmission of Hepatitis C Evaluated

FRIDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) should be screened for hepatitis C virus (HCV), especially those who engage in high-risk sexual behavior, according to a report in the July 22 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Increased Height Tied to Higher Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing height in women is associated with an increased risk of total cancer and cancer in most sites, according to a study published online July 21 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Greater Sun Safety Linked to Acculturation in Latinos

THURSDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- Use of sunscreen, shade, and sun-protective clothing when outdoors on warm, sunny days is associated with acculturation among Latinos in the United States, while perceived health status, educational level, and contact with social networks regarding health matters mediate a positive association between acculturation and sunscreen use, according to a study published in the July issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Best Performing Hospitals for Women in 19 U.S. States ID'd

THURSDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- The best performing hospitals for maternity care and gynecologic surgery across 19 states have been identified, according to the HealthGrades 2011 Obstetrics and Gynecology in American Hospitals report published online July 19 by HealthGrades.

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Annual Mammography Screening Should Begin at 40

THURSDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- Annual mammography screening for breast cancer in women should begin at age 40 years, and not at age 50 as previously recommended, according to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' (ACOG's) Practice Bulletin on Breast Cancer Screening, published in the August issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Medical Students Support Right to Conscientious Objection

THURSDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly half of medical students in the United Kingdom, especially Muslims, believe in the right of doctors to conscientiously object to or refuse any procedure, according to a study published online July 18 in the Journal of Medical Ethics.

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Hand Expression Linked to Improved Breast-Feeding Rates

THURSDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- Mothers who hand-express breast milk for their term infants feeding poorly shortly after birth are more likely to breast-feed their infants at two months than mothers who express with electric pumps, according to a study published online July 11 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood: Fetal & Neonatal.

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Soldiers' Dyspnea Could Be Constrictive Bronchiolitis

WEDNESDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Constrictive bronchiolitis should be considered as a reason for unexplained exertional dyspnea among previously healthy soldiers with a history of inhalational exposure, according to a study published in the July 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Milk, Soy Protein Intake Tied to Reduced Systolic BP

WEDNESDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Soy and milk protein intake is associated with reduced systolic blood pressure (BP) in patients with prehypertension and stage 1 hypertension, according to a study published online July 18 in Circulation.

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Triple-Drug Regimen Preferable for Treating H. Pylori

TUESDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- The standard 14-day triple-drug regimen is more effective for treating Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in Latin America than newer four-drug regimens, according to a study published online July 20 in The Lancet.

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Some Restaurant Foods Have More Calories Than Indicated

WEDNESDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- The overall measured and stated energy content of restaurant foods is accurate, but there is considerable discrepancy between stated and measured energy content for individual food items, according to a study published in the July 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Physical Activity Tied to Reduced Cognitive Decline Risk

WEDNESDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Regular physical activity reduces the rate of cognitive decline in older women with vascular disease or risk factors; and greater activity energy expenditure (AEE) reduces the incidence of cognitive impairment in older adults, according to two studies published online July 19 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Stopping Low Dose Aspirin Ups Cardiac Risk

WEDNESDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Discontinuation of low dose aspirin among patients with a history of cardiovascular disease appears to increase the risk for heart attack, according to a study published online July 19 in BMJ.

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Prenatal Partner Violence Tied to DNA Methylation in Offspring

WEDNESDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal exposure to intimate-partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy is associated with methylation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) promoter in adolescent children, according to a study published online July 19 in Translational Psychiatry.

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Secondhand Smoke Linked to Hearing Loss in Adolescents

TUESDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) is associated with an increased prevalence of low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and elevated pure-tone hearing thresholds in adolescents, according to a study published in the July issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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IOM Recommends Updates in Guidelines for Women's Health

TUESDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- Eight preventive health services for women should be added to the services that health plans will cover at no cost to patients under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, according to a July 19 report from the Institute of Medicine.

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FDA Approves Vaccine for 2011/2012 Influenza Season

TUESDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced that the agency has approved the influenza vaccine formulation for the 2011/2012 influenza season; this formulation will be used by the six manufacturers licensed to manufacture and distribute the vaccine in the United States.

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Low Health Literacy Linked to Poorer Health Outcomes

TUESDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- Limited health literacy is associated with poorer health outcomes and reduced use of health care services, according to a review published in the July 19 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Screening for Lynch Syndrome Beneficial at Acceptable Cost

TUESDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- Identifying families with the Lynch syndrome could yield considerable benefits at acceptable costs, particularly for women, according to a study published online July 18 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Acute Nondisplaced Scaphoid Fractures Heal Without Surgery

TUESDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- Most acute, nondisplaced, scaphoid fractures in children and adolescents heal with nonoperative treatment, but those presenting late or with displacement have a lower union rate, according to a study published in the July 6 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Increased Mortality for Isolated Rural Patients With COPD

TUESDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) living in isolated rural areas have increased mortality from COPD exacerbations compared to those living in urban areas, according to a study published in the July 19 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Bed-Sharing With Children Not Linked to Cognitive Outcomes

TUESDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- There appears to be no negative association between mother-child bed-sharing between the ages of 1 and 3 years, and cognitive and behavioral outcomes at age 5 years, according to a study published online July 18 in Pediatrics.

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Antidepressants Found Lacking for Seniors With Dementia

TUESDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- Seniors with dementia who are prescribed antidepressants may not reap any benefit from the medication, but they do experience some adverse effects, according to research published online July 18 in The Lancet.

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Obese, Not Overweight Teens Get More Preventive Screening

MONDAY, July 18 (HealthDay News) -- More preventive screening is provided to obese adolescents than those who are overweight or normal weight, according to a study published online July 18 in Pediatrics.

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Statin Therapy Does Not Up Cancer Risk in Older Adults

MONDAY, July 18 (HealthDay News) -- Statin therapy is not associated with a significant increase in cancer risk in older U.S. adults, according to a study published in the July 26 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Negative Tests Highly Predictive of No NSAID Allergy

MONDAY, July 18 (HealthDay News) -- The negative predictive value (NPV) of provocation tests for hypersensitivity with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is high, with none of the patients with a false negative test reporting a life threatening reaction, according to a study published online July 4 in Allergy.

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Children Safer in Car Crashes When Grandparents Driving

MONDAY, July 18 (HealthDay News) -- Children have a reduced risk of injury in crashes with grandparents as drivers than with parents, despite less optimal use of child restraint in grandparent-driver crashes, according to a study published online July 18 in Pediatrics.

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Evidence Supports Modifying Dietary Fat to Lower CV Risk

MONDAY, July 18 (HealthDay News) -- Modification of dietary fat intake, but not the reduction of total fat, is associated with a decreased risk of cardiovascular events, according to a meta-analysis published in the July issue of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

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Drinking Hot Tea, Coffee Tied to Lower MRSA Nasal Carriage

MONDAY, July 18 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals who drink hot tea or coffee have half the likelihood of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nasal carriage as those who do not drink hot tea or coffee, according to a study published in the July/August issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Safety Concern for Chronic NSAID Users With HTN, CAD

MONDAY, July 18 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic, self-reported use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with an increased risk of adverse events in patients with hypertension and coronary artery disease, according to a study published in the July issue of The American Journal of Medicine.

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A-Fib Ups Risk of Upper-Limb Thromboembolectomy

MONDAY, July 18 (HealthDay News) -- Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with an increased risk of upper-limb thromboembolectomy, according to a study published online July 7 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Factor VIII Dose Should Consider Both Body Weight and Fat Mass

MONDAY, July 18 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with hemophilia A, an infusion dose of factor VIII (FVIII) should be modified according to the patient's body weight (BW) and fat mass index (FMI), and should be adapted for over or underweight patients, according to a study published online July 5 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Faster Insulin Action With Needle-Free Jet Injection

FRIDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- Insulin administration by needle-free jet injector enhances insulin absorption and reduces the duration of glucose-lowering action more than with conventional pen administration, according to a study published online June 29 in Diabetes Care.

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Child Immune Response Tied to Mothers' Cytokine Production

FRIDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal inflammatory cytokines in pregnancy are associated with the corresponding cytokine levels in children at age 1 year, but children's atopic dermatitis is only associated with maternal atopic dermatitis, according to a study published in the August issue of Allergy.

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Clopidogrel, PPIs Linked to MI Risk After PCI

FRIDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- In high-risk cardiovascular patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), concomitant use of clopidogrel and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) is associated with an increased risk of cardiac events, specifically myocardial infarction (MI), according to a study published online July 5 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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BMI Changes Predictive of Bilateral Knee Pain in Women

FRIDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- Changes in body mass index (BMI) are associated with year 15 (Y15) bilateral knee pain in women irrespective of radiographic knee osteoarthritis (RKOA) status, according to a study published online July 7 in Arthritis Care & Research.

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Secondary Seizure Frequency Higher in Anovulatory Cycle

FRIDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- In women with intractable focal onset seizures, seizure frequency for secondary generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) is significantly greater during anovulatory cycles than during ovulatory cycles, according to a study published online July 14 in Epilepsia.

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BMI Increase From Adolescence to Adulthood Began in 1990s

FRIDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- The sharp body mass index (BMI) increase seen in adolescence began in the 1990s and in young adults in 2000, according to a study published online July 12 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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Vaccination Rates Up for Those With Liver Disease, Diabetes

FRIDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- Vaccination rates for hepatitis A (HepA) and hepatitis B (HepB) in patients with chronic liver disease (CLD) and diabetes increased from 1999 to 2008, but remain low, according to a study published online July 2 in Hepatology.

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Overall Number, Not Concurrent Partners Tied to HIV Incidence

FRIDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- The overall number of men's sexual partners, not partnership concurrence, is associated with the risk of women's HIV acquisition in sub-Saharan Africa, according to a study published in the July 16 HIV special issue of The Lancet.

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Severe Asthma Not Linked to Persistent Viral Presence

FRIDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- Respiratory-virus detection rates in the airways of patients with clinically stable and severe asthma are not significantly different from those of healthy controls, according to a study published in the August issue of Allergy.

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CDC: Travelers to Haiti at Risk for Dengue Virus Infections

THURSDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- Travelers to Haiti may be at risk for infection with the mosquito-transmitted dengue virus (DENV), according to a report in the July 15 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Vascular Disease Tied to Higher Stroke or Death Risk in A-Fib

THURSDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- The presence of a vascular disease, either peripheral artery disease (PAD) or prior myocardial infarction (MI), or both, is associated with increased risk of stroke or death in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), independent of Cardiac failure, Hypertension, Age, Diabetes, Stroke (doubled) (CHADS2) risk score, according to a study published in the July issue of the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Pediatric Cardiologists' ECG Analyses Not Always Accurate

THURSDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- Electrocardiograms (ECG) administered to young athletes to determine the suitability of sports participation are difficult for pediatric cardiologists to interpret with complete accuracy, according to a study published online July 14 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Treatment of Syndromes Linked to Spider Bites Ineffective

THURSDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- Latrodectism and loxoscelism are important worldwide clinical syndromes associated with spider bites, but the effectiveness of antivenom treatment is unclear, according to a review published online July 14 in The Lancet.

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Men With Full-Time Jobs More Active Than Nonworkers

THURSDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- Men with full-time employment, even in sedentary occupations, are significantly more active than healthy non-workers, according to a study published online July 12 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Intergenerational Social Mobility Affects HTN Risk

THURSDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- Low parental socioeconomic status (SES) is associated with an increased hypertension risk, but intergenerational social mobility modifies this risk, according to a study published online July 11 in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

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Low Positive Affect in Childhood Factors Into Eventual Depression

THURSDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- Low positive affect (PA) may be an early vulnerability factor for unipolar depressive disorder in at-risk children, and has more of an impact than high negative affect (NA), according to a study published in the July issue of the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.

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H1N1 2009 Vaccine Not Tied to Guillain Barré Syndrome Risk

THURSDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- The adjuvanted pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccine is not associated with an increased risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome, according to a study published July 12 in the BMJ.

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Unhealthy Lifestyle Factors Linked to Sexual Problems

THURSDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- Unhealthy lifestyle factors are associated with sexual inactivity with a partner in sexually active men and women, with sexual dysfunction significantly more likely in men, according to a study published online May 13 in The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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Age-Associated Health Decline Risk Factor for Alzheimer's

THURSDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- A frailty index of 19 deficits not previously reported to predict dementia is associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to a study published online July 13 in Neurology.

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Albuterol Not Better Than Placebo in Self-Report Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- Albuterol increases maximum forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) in patients with asthma, but self-reported outcomes did not improve significantly with albuterol compared to placebo inhaler or sham acupuncture, according to a study published in the July 14 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Many Americans Lack Access to Oral Health Care Services

WEDNESDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- Many Americans are not receiving necessary oral health care services due to barriers that hinder their access to dental care, according to a report by the Institute of Medicine and National Research Council published online July 13.

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Antiretroviral Drugs May Halt HIV Spread in Heterosexuals

WEDNESDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- A daily oral dose of antiretroviral drugs used for the treatment of HIV infection may reduce HIV acquisition among uninfected individuals exposed to the virus through heterosexual sex, according to the results of a new U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study, the TDF2 study, along with the results of a separate trial (Partners Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis [PrEP] study).

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Fast Food Close to Home Affects Diet in Low-Income Men

WEDNESDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- Availability of supermarket and grocery stores close to home is generally unrelated to diet, but low-income respondents may be sensitive to fast food availability, particularly for men with fast food chains located within 1.00 to 2.99 km of home, according to a study published in the July 11 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Medicaid Payments Linked to Dental Care in Children

TUESDAY, July 12 (HealthDay News) -- Children with Medicaid use dental care more frequently than uninsured children, with changes in state Medicaid payments positively correlated with higher receipt of dental care, according to a study published in the July 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Gender Discrepancy in Cancer Mortality Rates Considerable

TUESDAY, July 12 (HealthDay News) -- Males have higher mortality rates for cancer than females, but cancer survival disparities are much less pronounced between males and females, according to a study published online July 12 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Changes in Family Cancer History Impact Screening Needs

TUESDAY, July 12 (HealthDay News) -- Clinically relevant family history changes over time, specifically between the ages of 30 and 50 years, impact screening recommendations for colorectal, breast, and prostate cancer, according to a study published in the July 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Older Children Less Responsive to Treatment for Amblyopia

TUESDAY, July 12 (HealthDay News) -- Children aged 7 to less than 13 years of age are significantly less responsive to treatment for moderate and severe amblyopia than younger children, according to a meta-analysis published online July 11 in the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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High-Volume Exercise Feasible After Bariatric Surgery

TUESDAY, July 12 (HealthDay News) -- Following a high-volume exercise program (HVEP) is feasible for more than 50 percent of patients who have undergone Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and gastric banding, according to a study published in the June 16 issue of Obesity.

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Insulin Sensitivity, Secretion Do Not Predict Weight Change

TUESDAY, July 12 (HealthDay News) -- In nondiabetic and prediabetic individuals, insulin sensitivity and secretion do not predict spontaneous weight changes; whereas, baseline waist circumference is a positive, independent predictor of weight gain and loss, according to a study published in the July issue of Diabetes.

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Similar Thyroid Risk for Brand-Name, Generic Amiodarone

TUESDAY, July 12 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of thyroid dysfunction is similar in patients with atrial fibrillation treated with brand-name or generic formulations of amiodarone, according to a study published online July 11 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Mobile Sensor Device Effectively Monitors Sociability

TUESDAY, July 12 (HealthDay News) -- Sociability and physical activity data from mobile-sensor devices in older adults correlate well with data from traditional questionnaires, according to a study published in the July/August issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Folate Intake Positively Linked to Academic Achievement

MONDAY, July 11 (HealthDay News) -- Folate intake is positively associated with academic achievement in 15-year-old children, according to a study published online July 11 in Pediatrics.

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Higher Sodium-Potassium Ratio Linked to Mortality Risk

MONDAY, July 11 (HealthDay News) -- A higher sodium-potassium ratio is associated with increased risk for all-cause, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and ischemic heart disease (IHD) mortality in the United States, according to a study published online July 11 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Boostrix OK'd to Prevent Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis in Seniors

MONDAY, July 11 (HealthDay News) -- Approval for the Boostrix vaccine has been expanded by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to prevent tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis (whooping cough) in people 65 and older, the agency said in a news release.

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Secondhand Smoke Tied to Child Neurobehavioral Issues

MONDAY, July 11 (HealthDay News) -- Postnatal exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) is associated with an increase in the risk of neurobehavioral disorders among children, according to a study published online July 11 in Pediatrics.

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Satisfaction With Life Linked to Reduced Heart Disease

MONDAY, July 11 (HealthDay News) -- Satisfaction across specific life domains, particularly one's job, family, sex life, and self, is associated with a reduced risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), with the association primarily mediated by angina, according to a study published online July 4 in the European Heart Journal.

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Cardiac Transplants Tied to Increased Risk of Skin Cancer

MONDAY, July 11 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who have undergone cardiac transplants have an increased risk of developing skin cancer, in particular cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), compared to the general population, according to a study published in the July issue of the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Increase in Staph Pneumonia in Children Mainly Due to MSRA

MONDAY, July 11 (HealthDay News) -- The number of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) pneumonia cases in children increased between August 2001 and April 2009, with methicillin-resistant SA (MRSA) responsible for 74 percent of the cases, according to a study published in the July issue of the Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal.

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Early Metformin Therapy Prevents, Delays PCOS in Girls

MONDAY, July 11 (HealthDay News) -- Early metformin therapy in girls with low birth weight and precocious puberty (LBW-PP) prevents or delays the development of hirsutism, androgen excess, oligomenorrhea, and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), according to a study published online June 1 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Weight Loss and Weight Loss Maintenance Have Low Overlap

MONDAY, July 11 (HealthDay News) -- There is little overlap between the practices used to lose weight and those used to maintain weight loss, according to a study published online July 5 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Traditional Diabetes Classifications Apply to Youths

MONDAY, July 11 (HealthDay News) -- Most youths with diabetes have characteristics similar to traditional descriptions of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in the July issue of Diabetes Care.

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Lower Salt Does Not Reduce Mortality, CV Morbidity

MONDAY, July 11 (HealthDay News) -- Reduced dietary salt intake has no clear effect on mortality or cardiovascular morbidity in populations with normal or high blood pressure, but it is suggested to increase the risk of all-cause death in those with congestive heart failure, according to a review published in the July issue of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

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Maternal Vaccination Tied to Fewer Flu Hospitalizations

FRIDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal influenza vaccination during pregnancy is associated with a reduced risk of laboratory-confirmed influenza hospitalizations among infants aged less than 6 months, according to a study published in the June issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Socioeconomic Status Affects Systolic Blood Pressure

FRIDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- Low socioeconomic status (SES) is associated with increased systolic blood pressure (SBP), and the associations are mediated by increased body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference, and higher resting heart rate, according to a study published online July 5 in Hypertension.

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Prenatal Distress Tied to Higher Risk of Childhood Wheeze

FRIDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal demoralization is associated with an increased risk of childhood wheeze among low-income urban African-Americans and Hispanics, according to a study published in the July issue of the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

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Combination Therapy for A-Fib Increases Bleeding Risk

FRIDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- Combination antithrombotic therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with an increased risk of bleeding and no reduction in the risk of stroke, according to a study published in the July issue of Chest.

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New Report IDs Indicators of Children's Well-Being

FRIDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- Seven major domains characterize or influence the well-being of a child by means of various indicators, according to the "America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being 2011" report, published by the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics.

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H1N1, Seasonal Flu Vaccines From 2009 to 2010 Were Safe

FRIDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- The pandemic H1N1 influenza and seasonal influenza vaccines administered during the 2009 to 2010 season had no associated major safety problems, according to a study published online July 5 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Delayed Disease Recognition in One in Five Patients With PAH

FRIDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- One in five patients report symptoms of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) for more than two years before the disease is diagnosed, with patients younger than 36 years being most likely to experience delayed recognition, according to a study published in the July issue of Chest.

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Vitamin D3 Tied to Decrease in Mortality

FRIDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin D3, but not other forms of vitamin D, is associated with reduced overall mortality, according to a review published in the July issue of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

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Metformin/Rosiglitazone Tied to Early Decrease in Diabetes

FRIDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- Low-dose metformin/rosiglitazone therapy is associated with an initial delay in development of type 2 diabetes in individuals with impaired glucose tolerance, but it did not affect the worsening insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction that occurs over time, according to a study published in the July issue of Diabetes Care.

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Decrease in BP Precedes Death in Patients With Diabetes

FRIDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- A significant decline in systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) is seen in the years preceding death in adults with diabetes, according to a study published in the July issue of Diabetes Care.

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Postpartum Contraceptive Use Guidelines Updated

THURSDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- The use of combined hormonal contraceptives are not recommended during the first 21 days after delivery due to the high risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE), according to a report in the July 8 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Control of United States Obesity Epidemic Possible

THURSDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity rates in the United States are continuing to rise, but control and reversal of the epidemic is possible by strategic implementation of national-level policies, according to a June report published by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the Trust for America's Health.

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Drug Susceptibility in Gonorrhea May Be Declining

THURSDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- Cephalosporin susceptibility among Neisseria gonorrhoeae (N. gonorrhoeae) isolates appears to be declining; however, cephalosporins remain an effective treatment for gonorrhea, according to a report in the July 8 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Dignity Therapy Benefits Terminally Ill Patients

THURSDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- Terminally ill patients find dignity therapy helpful in alleviating secondary outcomes of distress, according to a study published online July 7 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Higher Incidence of OA Seen in U.S. Military

THURSDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- Active duty U.S. military personnel have significantly higher incidence rates (IRs) for osteoarthritis (OA) than comparable age groups in the general population, according to a study published online June 29 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Prepregnancy Heme Iron Intake Linked to Diabetes Risk

THURSDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- The intake of dietary heme iron before pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of developing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), according to a study published in the July issue of Diabetes Care.

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Breast-Feeding Does Not Affect MS Postpartum Relapse Rate

THURSDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- Breast-feeding is not associated with a lower risk of postpartum relapses in women with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study published online July 6 in Neurology.

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NSAIDs, COX-2 Inhibitors Tied to Increased Risk of A-Fib

THURSDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- Use of non-aspirin, non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or selective cyclooxygenase (COX) 2 inhibitors is associated with an increased risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter, according to a study published online July 4 in BMJ.

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Long-Term Indacaterol Effective in Pulmonary Disease

THURSDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) tolerate indacaterol well, and have improved bronchodilation at 52 weeks, according to a study published in the July issue of Chest.

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CRC Mortality Rates Vary Significantly Between States

THURSDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- There has been a significant decrease in colorectal cancer (CRC) mortality rates across all states in the United States, except Mississippi, between 1990 and 2007, with northeastern states showing the maximum decreases and the southern states showing the least, according to a study published in the July issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Conservative Scoliosis Treatment Tied to Lower Self-Concept

WEDNESDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- Conservative treatment of adolescent scoliosis may decrease self-concept scores, according to a study published in the July 1 issue of Spine.

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Nesiritide Has Small, Nonsignificant Effect on Dyspnea

WEDNESDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- Use of nesiritide has a small, nonsignificant effect on dyspnea in patients with acute heart failure, and is not associated with changes in rates of death and rehospitalizations, according to a study published in the July 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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New Regimens Equal to Standard Isoniazid for Adults With HIV

WEDNESDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- Novel secondary regimens to prevent tuberculosis in HIV-infected adults are no more effective than standard isoniazid for achieving tuberculosis-free survival; and isoniazid prophylaxis is not effective for improving tuberculosis-free survival in HIV-infected or uninfected children, according to two studies published in the July 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Sudden Unexpected Death Risk Higher in Epilepsy

WEDNESDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with epilepsy have an increased risk of sudden death compared to the general population, with the most important risk factor being the frequency of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS), according to a review published online July 6 in The Lancet.

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Sedentary Lifestyle Tied to Pulmonary Embolism Risk

WEDNESDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- A sedentary lifestyle is associated with an increased risk of incident pulmonary embolism in women, according to a study published online July 4 in BMJ.

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Low-Risk Lifestyle Linked to Lower SCD Risk Among Women

WEDNESDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- Conforming to a low-risk lifestyle is associated with a decreased risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in women, according to a study published in the July 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Eating Disorders Associated With High Mortality Rates

WEDNESDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with eating disorders -- anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS) -- have significantly increased mortality rates, with the highest rate in those with AN, according to a meta-analysis published in the July issue in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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High Risk of Rereport in Child Abuse Cases

WEDNESDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- A large percentage of children who remain in the home following an abuse report are at an increased risk of rereports and reabuse, according to a study published online July 4 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Withdrawal of Life Support Main Mode of NICU Deaths

WEDNESDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- Withdrawing life-sustaining support is the primary mode of death in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), and there has been a significant annual increase in withholding of care, according to a study published in the July issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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PCIs Done for Acute Indications Almost Always Appropriate

WEDNESDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- Most percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs) performed for acute indications are appropriate, but for nonacute indications the proportion of inappropriate PCIs is higher, with substantial between-hospital variations, according to a study published in the July 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Parental Deployment to War Takes Mental Toll on Children

WEDNESDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- Increased mental health diagnoses are observed in children of U.S. military personnel deployed in Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), according to a study published online July 4 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Stroke Burden Shows Substantial Global Variation

WEDNESDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- Stroke burden shows substantial global variation compared to ischemic heart disease (IHD), with countries with lower national income having disproportionately higher stroke death and disease burden than IHD, according to a study published online July 5 in Circulation.

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Lopinavir-Ritonavir Treatment Tied to Adrenal Dysfunction

TUESDAY, July 5 (HealthDay News) -- Postnatal treatment with lopinavir-ritonavir (LR) for newborn children of HIV-1 infected mothers who were exposed to LR in utero have an increased risk of transient adrenal dysfunction, according to a study published in the July 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Arcapta Inhaler Approved for COPD

TUESDAY, July 5 (HealthDay News) -- The Arcapta Neohaler (indacaterol inhalation powder) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the long-term treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

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CDC: Colorectal Cancer Screening Increasing

TUESDAY, July 5 (HealthDay News) -- Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates have increased in the United States in recent years and CRC incidence and mortality have fallen, though many people are still not receiving the recommended screening, according to a report published in the July 5 early-release issue of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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First Trimester Antidepressant Use Tied to Childhood ASD

TUESDAY, July 5 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), especially during the first trimester of pregnancy, may increase the risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in children, according to a study published online July 4 in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Massage Therapy Relieves Symptoms of Low Back Pain

TUESDAY, July 5 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with chronic low back pain have shown improved function and decreased pain with massage therapy, according to a study published in the July 5 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Shared Environment Tied to Autism Risk in Healthy Twin

TUESDAY, July 5 (HealthDay News) -- In twins, shared environment may have a greater impact on susceptibility to autism spectrum disorders (ASD) than genetic inheritance, according to a study published online July 4 in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Varenicline Use Linked to Adverse Cardiovascular Events

TUESDAY, July 5 (HealthDay News) -- Use of the smoking-cessation drug varenicline is associated with an increase in the risk of serious adverse cardiovascular events among tobacco users, according to a meta-analysis published online July 4 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Personalizing Frequency of Mammography Is Cost-Effective

TUESDAY, July 5 (HealthDay News) -- Personalizing the frequency of mammography on the basis of the woman's age, breast density, history of breast biopsy, and family history of breast cancer is cost-effective, according to research published in the July 5 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Late Talking Does Not Impact Later Behavioral Problems

TUESDAY, July 5 (HealthDay News) -- Language delay is associated with behavioral problems at age 2, but this delay is not a risk factor for behavioral or emotional problems in later childhood and adolescence, according to a study published online July 4 in Pediatrics.

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Increased First-Trimester Prescription Drug Use in U.S.

TUESDAY, July 5 (HealthDay News) -- Use of prescription medications in the first trimester of pregnancy increased from 1976 to 2008 in the United States, according to a study published in the July issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Memory Blackouts Predictive of Alcohol-Related Injury

MONDAY, July 4 (HealthDay News) -- A significant increase in alcohol-related injury (ARI) is seen in college drinkers who have memory blackout, with those suffering from more blackouts having a higher likelihood of ARI, according to a study published online June 27 in Injury Prevention.

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Vitamin D Supplementation Safe and Effective in Pregnancy

FRIDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- Daily 4000 IU vitamin D supplementation from 12 to 16 weeks of gestation is safe and effective in achieving vitamin D sufficiency in pregnant women and their neonates, according to a study published in the July issue of the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

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Aspirin As Primary Prevention Strategy Investigated

FRIDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- Aspirin may prevent the risk of total cardiovascular (CV) events and nonfatal myocardial infarctions (MI), but it does not significantly reduce the risk of stroke, CV mortality, all-cause mortality, or total coronary heart disease, according to a meta-analysis published in the June 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Elevated Blood Lead Levels in Adults on the Wane

FRIDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- The presence of elevated adult blood lead levels (BLLs) has fallen overall since the mid-1990s, but the highest prevalence of elevated BLLs is found in the manufacturing, construction, and mining industries, according to a report published in the July 1 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Underage Men Drink More During Holiday Weekend

FRIDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- There are an increased number of visits to hospital emergency departments for alcohol-related events over the fourth of July weekend, with young men at a higher risk than women, according to a study published on June 30 by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

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Soluble Fiber, Vigorous Activity Lower VAT Accumulation

FRIDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- Increased soluble fiber intake and vigorous physical activity significantly reduce the rate of visceral adipose tissue (VAT) accumulation in African- and Hispanic-Americans, according to a study published in the June 16 issue of Obesity.

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Around One in 10 Computerized Prescriptions Contains Errors

FRIDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- Approximately one in 10 computerized outpatient prescriptions contains errors, a third of which are potential adverse drug events, according to a study published online June 29 in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association.

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Pregravid Cardiometabolic Risk Factors Linked to GDM

FRIDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- Women with pregravid cardiometabolic risk factors are at significantly higher risk of developing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), according to a study published in the July issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Multiple Sclerosis Not Tied to Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes

FRIDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- For pregnant women, multiple sclerosis (MS) is not associated with adverse pregnancy or birth outcomes, according to a study published online June 27 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Older Breast Cancer Patients Likely to Die of Heart Disease

FRIDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- Older women diagnosed with breast cancer are more likely to die from comorbid conditions, especially cardiovascular disease (CVD), rather than from breast cancer, according to a study published online June 20 in Breast Cancer Research.

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